New answers tagged

1

I don't know about this character, but as far as I can tell from my search, there is no indication that マンボスチン was ever used even as slang. I think it's most likely that it's just a made-up word made by combining マンゴスチン (mangosteen) and マンボ (mambo), with no particular meaning other than that it has a "tropical" ring. That ムーチョ should be also for ...


2

甘い can be used to describe something that lacks a required level of sharpness, tightness, resilience, etc. ピントが甘い。 (of a photo) It is a bit out of focus. ねじが甘い。 The screw is a bit loose. It could also be used to describe a ball that doesn’t have enough air pressure.


1

弱い refers mainly to physical weakness, as an opposite to 強い. As per Jisho's definition #4, 甘い means "naive; overly optimistic; soft on; generous; indulgent; easy-going; lenient". In other words, it's less about being physically weak and more about an emotional weakness. So in the context you gave, it could mean either "You were naive to think ...


2

To me, it looks like a new compound coined by the author. It's not uncommon at all for a novelist to make up a new kanji word (see this for another example). It may be a rare term actually used somewhere in the past and known to experts. Still, an ordinary Japanese speaker don't know this word, and would not bother to look this up in a dictionary anyway. The ...


4

株 originally referred to tree stumps, from which new stems sprouted. It then came to mean a unit of plants (consisting of several stems made up of one or more individuals). Such unit of plants can be multiplied by 株分け, where this unit is broken up and divided into smaller 株s which grow individually, and can then be divided again (see here). The procedure to ...


3

That ような sounds redundant to me. It’s like saying: 勘違いしてしまうような男子がいそうで It seems there are boys like those who will mistakenly think she likes them Without it, the meaning basically remains the same. 勘違いしてしまう男子がいそうで It seems there are boys who will mistakenly think she likes them


2

Japanese and English are very different in how they communicate information. A stand alone sentence in English can frequently be understood (even if only imperfectly) without any further context. Japanese is quite different. Just a simple verb alone is an entire sentence. 見たな What does this mean? It could mean: "I saw you", "you saw me&...


0

According to デジタル大辞泉 entry on ようだ, (2)例示の意を表す。「隣のおばさんのような働き者は少ない」 The ような in「勘違いしてしまうような男子」simply illustrate what type of 男子 is. If it helps, here's my tentative translation of the sentence you provided Alice: Yeah. Since she is very nice to everyone, it seems to me there are guys like the ones who take it as a wrong idea. I'm worried about that.


1

This is not some special construction, but is a simple combination of で and ね. ね is a sentence-final particle used to seek agreement or draw the listener's attention. で can be either a case particle or the continuative form of the copula だ. As a case particle, で has many roles, so its translation can vary. 東京でね。 (That is) in Tokyo, you know. 3日でね。 Within ...


1

決闘 is used for the one-time win/lose situation to be involved in the honor. It is especially used to refer the stage damage/being damaged in a direct way.(i.e. French mathematician Évariste Galois are believed to have dueled for his fiancée, Kojiro Sasaki and Musashi Miyamoto are believed to have dulled for their art of sword mastery in Ganryu island and so ...


2

決闘 specifically refers to this tradition to protect one's honor, fought with rapiers, pistols or such. It usually ends with one of the participant's death. Basically this is something in the past (at least in developed countries), and you won't see this outside of wild-west movies or dramas set in the middle ages. This kind of dueling was mainly practiced in ...


4

That English translation is not very literal. As you said, 何もしない means "not to do anything". In your case, you can think two relative clauses are nested like this: [ 学校にも行かない [ 何もしない人達 ] ] [ [ people who don't do anything ], who don't even go to school ] Alternatively, you can think this is a list of independent relative clauses. This is not ...


2

I guess the author (of the website) takes the sentence as follows: (A) NEET = 何もしない人々 where 仕事をする or 学校に行く are examples of things they don't do, whereas you take the sentence to mean (B) NEET = (仕事しない + 学校に行かない + 何もしない)人々. Both are not too different and I am not sure which is more natural. Anyway it looks like the author tries to translate the sentence ...


1

勝負 is a general term ranging in meaning from a game to a contest which includes such things as fights and contests to settle disputes (which is what a duel in English usually refers to). 決闘 is a particular kind of 勝負 that we generally translate as a duel.


1

I'll attempt to answer the question, but your confusion over the meaning is due to a general misconception you seem to have about how Kanji work. You may have noticed that 償 has a Kun and an On reading, whereas 賠 only has an On reading. 償 can be part of a word, for example 償還【しょうかん】 where you would use the On reading. It can also be used by itself as the ...


1

I think Shurim's answer is more or less right, but let me add my own answer. First, filling the omitted words in the last sentence becomes as follows: [アーリンちゃんが優しい]からこそ[私たちはアーリンちゃんと戦う]という場合もあるな。 (Note: だ in だからこそ appears because the clause is omitted; な at the end does not affect the meaning, so 場合もあるな=場合もある here) A translation would be アーリンちゃん is kind, that ...


1

ねー and ねえ are both corrupted ない (ai-to-ee contraction). よ and ぞ are sentence-final particles (ぞ sounds relatively stronger). んだ is short of のだ, where this の is an explanatory-no, which in this case is used to convince the listener. じゃねーよ = じゃないよ = ではない + よ じゃねえんだぞ = じゃないんだぞ = ではない + の + だ + ぞ Thus a very literal translation would be: Not "[happened ...


-1

A shorter response: だからこそ: This is exactly why ... という場合もある: which some circumstances like this does happens To break apart the second phrase, という is which; 場合 is circumstances ; もある can be interpreted as have (if subject is a thing) or happens (if subject is a circumstance)


2

In English, "to pick" used with intangible objects can mean something like "to choose (or pay attention to) important ones (from similar entities)". 拾う in Japanese has a similar usage, as shown in the following examples: 彼の発言を拾う to pick up on his statement (among many statements in a conference) 面白そうなコメントを拾う to pick interesting comments (...


0

I think 拾う here means ( uphold / stick by / carry over ) the イメージ像 (expectations). Edit: To paraphrase, 光永 was explaining how the character design of the main heroine came to be. He mentioned certain イメージ像 (expectations) that come to people's minds when they hear certain keywords, and that they have become so since a number of generations. Then another ...


1

I'm just guessing. I think it means that the author of this manga has taken the image that manga lovers have of the main heroine and used it in the character design. A little above this sentence, there is a sentence that says, 「女戦士」って言われたら、真っ先に『ドラゴンクエスト III』のヘルメットをかぶった鳥山明先生の[女戦士の]イラストが思い浮かぶのと同じで」 "It's like when someone says 'female warrior', the ...


4

This is Kansai dialect. When translated into standard Japanese, it becomes, "知ってる顔にでも会ったのか?". 会うた + んか = 会った + のか?


5

This ポン is an onomatopoeia which represents a tiny explosive sound, like "Pop!" or "Pong!". で is technically a method/means/situation marker here (e.g., "With 住所, something pops"). What ポン represents depends on the title. 住所でポン: ポン describes how a phone number "pops" up. パネルでポン: ポン describes how the matched panels &...


2

Practically speaking, you can take [clause] + こと + [numerical expression] to mean 'Now I talk about things when I do [clause] [numerical exp]. It is a rhetoric to arouse listener's attention. Your Examples: 今を去ること20年前 : (Now I talk about) 20 years ago 今を去る20年前 : I think this can be think of the version where こと is dropped 東京を去ること200キロ : I went 200km from ...


3

This is a fixed pattern used with a time length, a distance, etc. It sounds dramatic as compared to simple 20分待つと, etc. オーブンに入れて待つこと20分、美味しいケーキが焼けました。 Twenty minutes in the oven and .... 自宅を出て車で走ること15km、隣町のショッピングセンターに到着した。 Fifteen kilometers after leaving home, and ... 遡ること2日、この部屋では別の事件が起きていた。 Two days back, ... 考え続けること実に3時間、我々はついにひとつの結論に達した。 ベルを鳴らすこと10回、...


5

'従業員' should suffice for 'employee', as far as I can think of. 職人 means craftsmen or skilled workers, those who actually make things (furniture, houses, instruments etc) 実業家 cannot be an employee. The word means those who own business, so chances are that s/he is an employer. (Of course, one can be employed somewhere and starts some business on their own, ...


6

"Employee" is 従業員 in Japanese. 被雇用者 is also used in strict legal contexts. The other two are very different. 職人: artisan; craftsman 実業家: entrepreneur; business owner/executive; business person (who has a high position in a company)


0

Here is an outdated answer: 整える is not used for 'to adjust'. My Japanese-English dictionary at hand lists 'fix' and 'prepare' for 整える. You don't say 'fix the temperature' in English, do you?


3

I also wonder why だ is used at the end. It quotes the phrase 「なるようになれ」 as a noun referring to the policy "let it be". So to complement a context, it kind of says: I'll bet on "let it be".


2

"なる" = "to be" "ように" = "like" "なれ" = "Be" So it means something like "let it be" in a negative tone. He gets desperate.


2

はーい is correct. You can add more dashes or use 〜 if you want, or you might spell it はぁい (or perhaps はあい), but ははい has an extra h-sound.


1

You pretty much have it... Yes いままで is the same as 今まで. And Here it is used as a point in time for relative to なかった. なかった simply meaning something did not exist in the past. So put together it is "A pattern we haven't seen until now."


3

Whether to translate 映画 as “a movie”, “movies”, “the movie”, or “the movies” depends on the context and cannot be determined by its position in a sentence alone. However, word order does affect the focus of a sentence. When there is no additional context, 私は映画を仕事のあと見た looks like a (bit redundant) response to a question about when the speaker watched 映画. In ...


2

Those two Japanese sentences mean the same thing, although the latter is more natural. Japanese word order is more flexible than that of English. The Japanese language does not have the equivalents of "a", "the" and "-s". If there is absolutely no context, even a bilingual human cannot often tell if the correct English ...


2

This is not an independent word, but either a part of どうして/どういうこと ("Wha...!") or just a meaningless scream ("Argh!", "Oh"). (どっ is not a usual interjection used in a situation like this, but a fictional character can have an idiosyncratic way of being surprised...)


0

It seems to be just onomatopoeia. If it means something, the closest I can think of is WHAT?!.


1

キリ means gimlet. 型means "type" There are some type of screwdriver. Name is different on the shape. I don't know much about when getting stucked キリisn't 切り(cut)


2

~ても means something like 'even if' or 'no matter'. Because the sentence pairs it within a question word, here we have 'no matter where one goes'. おまえのような ヒーローきどり is a whole noun phrase, ヒーローきどり itself being one noun. 'Wannabe heroes like you'. しゃしゃりでる essentially means to butt into things that don't concern you. から directly following a predicate means '...


1

The key idea behind するのに is the idea of purpose. It has a different, more specific meaning than "することについては". Don't think of するのに as a set phrase because it isn't - think of it as the purpose marker に, except the の is added to convert a preceding verb in する form back to a noun. As such, the する or の may not always be there. Most of the time, (するの)に ...


2

Yes. In this case, 腕 itself means skill. You can also think that it's got shortened from "腕前", which also means skill / talent. "前" in this case is suffix that emphasize the previous word. e.g. 男前:handsome man. Similar words are "手腕", "手並み" - which also means skill / talent.


1

It shows ”ろく たす なな“. To obfuscate sentence, It use combination of HIRAGANA and KATAKANA. 6+7


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