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0

Japanese people sometimes localize loan words keeping only the proper noun and omitting the common noun. Eg: Röntgenstrahlung → レントゲン線 → レントゲン Baumkuchen → バウムクーヘン → バウム


3

Its just the German word for it. German does not use X-Ray, it's Röntgenstrahlung or just Röntgen for short. You can even use it as a verb.


2

I guess 「オドキリ 」is composed of onomatopoeia「オドオド」: "Because they are getting nervous, they look uneasy/restless" + 「ドッキリ」」: "they are getting surprised because it's unexpected." And concatenate them altogether into the ligature-like name 「オドキリ 」. It seems "he is not confident" in total. I have no idea about what「アーポン」means. I can find an idol called「あーぽん」, ...


3

The suffix 町 "town" can be part of a place name, like 都・道・府・県 and 市・区. As a rule of thumb (for example in addresses), I would say 町 is not translated, but just transliterated as -chō or -machi, depending on the actual reading. That said, in some circumstances it may be translated (for example in fiction or, say, brochures for foreign residents), in which ...


-3

Papa and Mama is intertional word , it's came from baby saying Pa amd Ma ,a lot of European language use it ,also asia and many country, so Japanese may be didnt borow it from other but if think about what language influence this word to japan I think it is Chinese language btw I have heard chinese people also call their parent as Papa and Mama too event ...


6

_都/道/府/県 _市 _区 _町 町 is just part of the name of an area in 市/区, so it can be written as (-)cho or (-)machi depending on its actual name. An area name does not always contain 町. 東京都町田市小山町(Oyamacho / Oyama-cho) 東京都町田市金森(Kanamori) 東京都千代田区一番町(Ichibancho / Ichiban-cho) 東京都千代田区飯田橋(Iidabashi) 大阪府大阪市中央区松屋町(Matsuyamachi / Matsuya-machi) 大阪府大阪市中央区北浜(Kitahama) Note: ...


15

レントゲン is named after the inventor of the X-ray, Wilhelm Röntgen (ウィルヘルム・レントゲン) — who named them X-rays, whence the confusion. A number of words in Japanese medical terminology were adopted from German (a popular example being カルテ from German Karte). I guess it would not be surprising if レントゲン was also imported already as a medical term for X-ray, from ...


5

I guess, this word based on name of Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, german physicist, who first detect electromagnetic radiation in this (X-ray) range. It's similliar with russian colloquial word for X-ray detector ー "Рентген" (pronounce like "ˈrentjən").


3

This ごと is a suffix that attaches to a noun and means "along with ~", "including ~", etc. It's normally written in hiragana, but it's 共 in kanji, not 事. 皮ごとブドウをたべる to eat grapes along with the skin サイア人を惑星ベジータごと消滅させる to vanish Saiyans along with Planet Vegeta (from this question) ~の面倒をその危険ごとみる to look after someone along with the risks he/she has ...


2

In this sentence, 「といったところ」is "it "is worth"/"deserves" ~~(to how much extent)". So, 「さすがといったところ」means "worth praise." or "deserve acclaim", or something alike which expresses her authenticity to "so-called orthodox cuteness". 「ツボを押さえる」may come from "acupuncture". It is used to massage/press the point/part which is effective to soften the fatigue of some ...


4

You should remember this set phrase as 手を抜く, which means "to cut corners" or "to get lazy". 抜く is a simple transitive verb that means "to omit" here. Its variations can be explained by the basic grammar rules. In potential form, を can be replaced by が, so we can say 手が抜ける / 手が抜けない as well as 手を抜ける / 手を抜けない. See: The difference between が and を with the ...


3

While there is an argument to be made that this question can be answered by a dictionary lookup (as provided by macraf), I think that こだわる can be a little bit tricky sometimes and so this warrants an answer. こだわる can mean things across a fairly wide range of English words. Jisho provides a decent definition, although as always the monolingual dictionary ...


3

In Japanese language, shortening the word is common(ex ファミコン from ファミリー・コンピューター: family computer, スマホ from スマートフォン: smartphone). So, 「連ツイ」should be 「連続ツイート」: a series of tweet, successive tweet, etc. Probably the author is not saying a series of tweets are already categorized by some characteristics. Therefore, I think "group" is bit off here. The author ...


2

It's short for 連続ツイート, or successive tweets (posted by a single user about a certain topic).


4

This ~もクソも(ない) is a dirty version of ~も何も(ない) described here and here. In slangy speech, 何 in ~も何も can be replaced by クソ, ヘチマ, へったくれ, etc., which are basically metaphors for crappy/meaningless things (see this discussion in Japanese). In this context, he is saying asking "何(か)" to him is meaningless. 何してるの? What are you doing? 何かもクソも、寝るだけだよ。 = ...


2

In general, [noun]+別 means "[noun]-categorized", which as a whole a noun-like thing that has adjective meaning. It is mostly used in combination with certain verbs to mean "(sorted/classified/divided...) by [noun]". With the current available context, 学年別におけるクラスの勝敗 is open to two interpretations. Simply "class win/lose in each grade" or "on the grade basis"...


5

This ったら is not really a conditional in the way なら is, although it does look like etymologically it came from the conditional たら. In terms of meaning, it's used to gently express a combination of mild surprise and embarrassment or criticism. See here (in Japanese). There's a fairly good explanation here on HiNative, but basically 私ったら is expressing mild ...


3

This sentence seems puzzling to me, too. The literal translation is "The exam period is at the end of the month, which is about two weeks later including today." This の is an apposition marker (cf. 3日の月曜日 "Monday, the 3rd"). 今日を含めて is "including today", but it is technically unnecessary (2週間後 is "14 days later", which is not ambiguous), and it does not go ...


1

ある日を境に俺とヴィンスの間に混ざるようになったエミーは、木の枝を見つけてきては、勝ち気な青い目を長い金髪の間に覗かせながら、俺たちの間に入ってきた。 It is read as 「あいだ」. In the first (俺とヴィンスの間に) and third (俺たちの間に) usages of this sentence, it means "among" or "within". It could mean "between" as far as a spatial distance, but without context from previous sentences, I'd say it's unlikely. In the second usage (長い金髪の間に), it ...


4

最多 is "the most (in numbers)". But "一日の感染者数" means "the number of people infected PER DAY". So it's NOT talking about the number of people infected IN TOTAL. For example: One day 10 people get infected. Another day maybe 12, other 8. In that case, "一日の感染者数の最多" would be 12. Now, yesterday 20 people newly get infected, so it can be said 一日の感染者数の最多が更新された. ...


4

For verbs that end in つ, the imperative (command) form ends in て. It's just a coincidence that that looks similar to the same verb in て form. And yes, the pronunciation is not the same, as indicated by the lack of the small つ.


2

One of meanings of 目当て is "target", or "something conspicuous that you eagerly look for". 2 心の中で目指しているもの。行動のねらい。目的。「目当ての品」「金目当て」 X目当てに literally means "with X as the target", an adverbial phrase that qualifies a verb, which is omitted in this sentence, but easily assumed as 来る or something like that. X目当てにさらに (enemies) が [omitted verb]! → "(Enemies) ...


0

the 目当 characters translates to "see at this spot/point". It does not say anything about "more". I think the character says that "do it mr.x attack the enemy in front of you"


10

I'd translate it "cultural climate". Personally, I don't think it's a very well-defined word, as I often see it used naively i.e. confuses geographical, biological, inherent conditions with sociological, acquired conditions when explaining a social phenomenon. I don't know whether yours is the case or not.


4

This 行って is not いって but おこなって ("to do/conduct/perform"). 行く and 行う look the same in the te-/ta-form in kanji, but 交流を行く does not make sense because 交流 is not a place. Its subject is the school itself, not the students. This (-て)くる after おこなう is a subsidiary verb that roughly means "until today", "over time", etc (see: Difference between -ていく and -てくる and ...


4

For the difference between うち and いえ, please see: What is the difference between いえ and うち? 宅【たく】 is not used as a standalone noun. This kanji is used mainly as part of longer compounds such as 自宅, 邸宅 or 宅地. Or did you hear お宅【おたく】? お宅 is an honorific expression used to refer to someone else's home respectfully. お宅 is also a blunt and/or nerdy second-person ...


4

Yes, this is a fixed pattern that requires two も's. It's hard to explain "why", but Japanese も can be used twice to list two similar things (e.g., 国語も英語も得意です, 泣いても笑ってもこれで最後だ). Meaning of 「X 一緒なら Y 一緒」 What nuances do the も…ば…も structure carry? What is the grammar behind もなければ、なければ? JGram: も~ば~も What nuance would be different if は were to be used? Simply,...


2

This ここ is "here" and it refers to the current situation/issue at hand. This ここは can be translated like "in this case", "ragarding this (issue)", "this is where (something/someone comes into play)", or simply "well then". 個々 is not relevant. Note that 個々 is usually written in kanji, and "individially" or "one by one" is 個々に, not 個々は.


3

Translation B is correct. Here's why: "Unknown" is in the passive voice, but 知らない is in the active voice. The literal translation of 知らない物語 is always "story (someone) does not know" rather than "story that is not known". This の is a subject marker rather than a possession marker. See: How does the の work in 「日本人の知らない日本語」? To say "your unknown story", ...


1

Shichi-Go-San (七五三) is a traditional rite of passage and festival day in Japan, held annually on November 15, in which three- and seven-year-old girls and five-year-old (and less commonly three-year-old) boys, along with their parents, visit shrines to pray for their growth and well-being. As it is not a national holiday, it is generally observed on the ...


9

Does this class of words have a name? I don't think so. Do words like "banana" and "indivisibility" have a special name in English? Are these words more poetic in a way? As wordplay, a poem that contains many such words may exist somewhere, but it's not popular at all. Are there other, longer, words like this that I missed? Japanese has only 5 ...


3

A very literal translation would be: もちろん「バスケに対して真剣に取り組むからこそ」ではあるんだろうが。 (literal) Of course, it would be (like) "Because he is putting effort into basketball seriously", though. → Of course this is because he is devoting himself to basketball, though. ではある is a contrastive (は) version of である, which is a stiff version of だ. This is used to ...


4

So this is the original context: I must say in the beginning that the sequence 性懲りも無く頭を過ぎった would be hard to make sense if there were no specific context, though both 性懲りも無く and 頭を過ぎる are common idioms (see @naruto's answer). The main reason is that this expression is a transferred epithet which is not conventional. 性懲りも無く "despite one's failures" should ...


2

Ok I made a mistake: I thought that the passive causative form was used with 詰む. But in fact, the verb was 詰まる with the causative and the dictionary gives: 言葉{ことば}に詰{つ}まる (exp,v5r) to be at a loss for words


5

First of all, please forget the "matching" translations you found. You're somehow seeing something totally irrelevant. 性懲り on its own means something like "learning (by a bad experience)" or "feeling like not repeating something any more". But this word is used almost exclusively in the idiom 性懲りもなく ("without 性懲り"), which you should learn as a set phrase. ...


4

As you already figured out つーか = というか, you can see by analogy that this expression is というかなんというか in its full form. This is an idiom, close to filler. If broken down literally, Xというかなんというか means "not sure if it is X or something other". It embraces more "hesitation" than mere というか, and is used chiefly in two kinds of situations: when X is close but there ...


3

This 出る is the third entry under #4 here. ある態度をとる。ある態度で相手に対する。 To take/adopt a (given) attitude/behavior/manner of acting. To face the person you're interacting with with a (given) attitude/behavior/manner of acting. In this case, the behavior that is being adopted is the entire sentence between ここは and に出よう. A 作戦, or strategy, typically comprises a ...


4

I don't see any deeper nuance to the phrase 身を包む. It literally means 'to wrap yourself up', or in other words 'to wear'. To me, it simply conveys that they were dressed in uniforms. You don't mention the source but I am assuming it is from a novel perhaps? As with English, writers often use alternative ways to express something if they feel it is too prosaic....


4

示す to (take out and) show; to demonstrate; to tell; to exemplify; to make apparent​ to point out (finger, clock hand, needle, etc.)​ to indicate; to show; to represent; to signify; to display. This is meaning 1 of course. 見せる/みせろ show display. It means to "make (something) clear" to the school, like "show them what's wrong". ...


5

This may be the first time an answer to a question on this site was "the automatic translation got it right". However, this time the automatic translation did get it right. 偽 is a fairly common prefix that can be attached to other words to mean a fake version of that thing, although it has slightly broader applications than the English word fake and can ...


5

You're right that the subject (須藤) shows his growth. Here, the subject of the causative verb のぞかせる is 須藤. And the object of のぞかせる is 精神面での成長. So the subject/agent of のぞく "peep out" is 精神面での成長. [精神面での成長も覗かせている]須藤 (≂ 精神面での成長も見せている須藤) ⇒ 須藤が(=subject) 精神面での成長を(=object) 覗かせている (causative "make something peep out") (も has replaced を in your example) "Sudo ...


3

かかる can mean: かかる ㊸ そのような性質・傾向を帯びる。 「青みのかかった緑色」 (from 明鏡国語辞典) 「青みのかかった緑色」 = "bluish green" (≂ 青みを[帯]{お}びた緑色)  It can also be used in the form of がかる as a suffix: かかる ㈢ 〘接尾〙《名詞に付いて、「がかる」の形で》 ❷ ‥‥色を帯びる意を表す。 「紫[黄色・黒み・オレンジ]がかった赤い色」 (from 明鏡国語辞典) An example from プログレッシブ和英辞典: 紫がかった灰色の上着 a purplish gray coat


3

According to ふりがな文庫, the most frequent kun-reading is うち. うち is mentioned in this entry, but うら is not mentioned in this entry. However うち, うら and なか equally make sense in your sentence, and I don't think it possible to determine the reading in one way without furigana. They are fairly rare kun-readings, anyway. FWIW, I knew only the on-reading, り, as in 秘密裡....


2

It's basically a stylized way of using kanji. It's fairly common in manga and songs to substitute the standard reading for something else in furigana. It's a way of adding extra meaning to the 'main' phrase in kanji. There is actually quite a bit of flexibility available to writers when using this particular artifice. You can play around with it and do ...


4

決定 can be used as a する-verb to mean 'to decide'. Also from 大辞林: ① はっきりときめること。また、きまること。 「活動方針を-する」 Now, 'confirm' is just more natural in English than saying 'decide' I suppose.


3

"It's my duty as student president to correct the behavior of my classmates. [Part I'm not sure about] ... I'll give you some guidance." I think you have understood the nuance of the sentence almost perfectly. I am surprised you can't fill the gap of the part where you are unsure easily since you have understood 「...素行を正す」: "correct the behavior...". and 「...


1

Is it a special pattern or is it explicable with the "usual" meaning of だけ? It's meaning (2) in this definition. In this case, dake corresponds to an upper limit or the maximum possible. In English "only" usually implies a limitation or a lack but in Japanese "dake" can also imply exactitude, something like "precisely", or up to some limit or another. ...


1

Probably you are checking the patent of 多重巻きパイプ用Cuめっきステンレス鋼板およびその製造方法 by 日新製鋼. I do not understand the whole detail of the patent for sure, but 融着{ゆうちゃく} should be related to 「セルフブレージング」: "self-brazing" since the background:「背景」of the patent says 『多重巻きパイプは、Cuめっきを施した鋼帯を造管用ロールで巻き回してパイプ形状に造管し、還元性ガス雰囲気中でCuの融点以上に加熱することによってCuめっき層同士を融着するセルフブレージング(以下、ブレージング)...


3

These questions are fairly similar, but certainly not identical. I would translate these sentences like this: どんなマンガが好きですか? What kind of manga do you like? Versus, 好きなマンガはなんですか? What manga do you like? The important difference is that when you ask about 好きなマンガ, you are asking for specific manga that the person likes, versus どんなマンガ which ...


2

Is the current use in the sentences (to be able to keep with the studies) an extension of the original meaning (to follow)? Yes, of course. English speakers also say "I'm following you" meaning "I understand what you are saying so far", so I don't think this usage is tricky. Note that simple words like つく have dozens of meanings, and many of them are ...


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