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5

There are several common compounds that include 卓 (e.g., 食卓, 卓上, ...), but 卓 as a standalone noun is uncommon. As a starter, you can stick to テーブル in almost all the cases where you want to say table. In modern Japanese, 卓 as a standalone noun is used: as part of a few set expressions like 卓を囲む (テーブルを囲む is equally common, though) as a rare and highly stiff ...


3

Maybe you've heard expressions like みたいな気がする and みたいな感じがする. みたいな is just a shorter form of that. They all mean something along the lines of I feel like I kinda think Japanese use this expression to make the sentence softer/more careful/less sure, as to not present it as a fact, but just your humble opinion/feelings.


3

まず、この文脈での「驚く」は、surprised というよりも、disappointed に近い意味で使われています。 ですので、「ショック」「衝撃」のような、爆発的な印象はあまりありません。 ①「同じ過ちを繰り返す自分に呆れた」 これを「同じ過ちを繰り返す自分に驚いた」と言い換えるのは可能です。 「うんざりした」も使えると思います。ですが「飽きた」は使いません。 この使い分けを考える場合、この文章に「後悔している」といった意味も含まれていると考えると分かりやすいかもしれません。 ②「呆れただろう!子どもっぽいって!」 これも「呆れる」が「がっかり」を意味していると考えて問題ありません。 また「いえいえ、そんなことは思ってない!」と否定しているのは、主に「子どもっぽい」の部分かと思います。 (...


6

「あきれる」には、多少の驚きや意外に思う気持ちは含まれていますが、爆発的な衝撃というニュアンスはありません。溜め息が出そうな気持ちや、この絵文字 (🤷)みたいな感じも「あきれる」で表現できます。 明鏡国語辞典で「あきれる」を引くと、「物事の異常さや言動の非常識さなどに驚いてとまどいを感じる」という定義になっており、「ふつう驚きとともに非難や愛想づかしの意がこもる」という注釈がついています。つまり、単に「驚いた」という気持ちだけではなく「非常識だ」「バカだ」という気持ちが普通は入っているということです。文脈によっては驚きの意味がほとんどなく、「バカだ、どうしようもない」という意味の方が中心になることもあると思います。あなたの挙げた3つの例はいずれも、「驚いた」よりも「なんてバカなんだろう」...


4

~~気がする means "I feel like~~" "I get the feeling that~~". So ~~気がしない means "I don't feel like~~" "I don't get the feeling that~~". もうここにいられる気がしない。 To break it down... もう~~ない not anymore ここにいられる can stay here 気がしない don't feel like... Putting them back together: I don't feel like I can stay here any longer.


0

It means "I don't feel like I can be here any more." See: https://selftaughtjapanese.com/2014/01/06/use-your-energy-useful-expressions-in-japanese-which-use-ki-%E6%B0%97%EF%BC%89intermediate/


5

It's because 知らない人同士 is 知らない人 + 同士 rather than 知らない + 人同士. 同士 is a word that can be attached to any noun that represents a person (or sometimes an object). There is no grammatical difference between 恋人同士, 友達同士, 先生同士, 似た者同士 and 知らない人同士.


3

I get what you mean. Depending on delivery, those phrases can convey irritation. But if you make sure to sound ultra sincere and sympathetic (conveying 'warmth'), it will come across as if you're really serious about your work and care about the other person. In this sense, you could definitely use 「安心してください」、「(それに関しては)安心して欲しいです」. 「ご安心頂ければと存じます」and「...


3

It's not incorrect. It sounds a bit "matter-of-fact" and kind of "abrupt" though. Also, this largely depends on who's asking in what context. If it's your acquaintance who is about to order drinks for both of you at a restaurant, you could maybe say 「(私は)水で」or「お水を一杯」etc depending on the tone you're going for. If they're asking out of curiosity (i.e. "what ...


5

Yes, you can safely say 水です. The implied subject ("it") refer's to "what I want to drink". Moreover, in Japanese, it's even perfectly natural to say 私は水です if there is enough context! See: Are possessive particles implied in a conversation?


2

Doesn't the question of whether this sentence would be "too harsh or rude or unprofessional" depend largely on your relationship with the other person? What is appropriately harsh in an email to a subordinate who has already been warned about his or her poor performance might be completely out of bounds if you're addressing a colleague of equal rank – let ...


3

There are various "WH" words in Japanese -- the question words, like the English "who, what, where, when, why, how" -- that shift in meaning when used together with the inclusive particle も. も in Japanese is sometimes translated like "even, also". In combination, it's also a bit like "-ever": 何 "what" + も "-ever" → "whatever", 誰 "who" + も "-ever" → "...


4

Meaning-wise and grammar-wise, this sentence is perfect. Indeed it is harsh, but it may be rightly so; there are situations you may need to write an email like this one. Anyone who has received it will notice his/her overall work attitude is severely doubted.


3

It's なぜか ("somehow", "for some reason") + 退け【のけ】られている ("to be being shunned/alienated"). 浮遊感 literally means "floating/drifting feeling", but in this context it symbolizes her sense of detachment from other people in the class.


3

Your guess is correct. He appends the くれる because he is "thankful" to Sakura for staying the way she is (and hopes that she does). 「その状態」 here most likely refers to her state of ignorance, i.e.「何も知らないままの状態が一番いい」. To be 100% precise, it would actually refer to 「何も知らないままでいてくれる状態」. Or, alternatively, you could interpret the sentence as implying「...


4

Yes, the subject of 何も知らない is 咲良, and this くれる is used because 咲良's ignorance is beneficial to the speaker. Of course 咲良 is doing nothing intentional or visible for the speaker, but since he is feeling 咲良's ignorance is desirable and thank-worthy, くれる is still a natural choice. その状態 also refers to the fact that 咲良 knows nothing. 何も知らないままでいてくれるなら、その状態が一番いい。...


6

You're right, 多くの人の手 refers to (existing) efforts by many other people. Grammatically speaking, there is a parenthetical aside in this sentence. That is, 多くの人の手により出尽くした感もあるけど has been inserted as an aside, as if it were in parentheses. 新しいデザインを作るまで、多くの人の手により出尽くした感もあるけど、諦めません。 Until a new design is finished — although I can't help feeling all ...


3

It means something like "I'll let you off the hook (with this)". Either the speaker (let's call him A) had previously done some favor for the other person (B) and B had just returned the favor, or alternatively, B had previously done something to anger A, and in this case, A had just "paid it back" by punishing B. Either way, what A is saying is either "...


2

It's definition 17 on Jisho: somewhat; -ish So, かため means on cooked a bit on the hard side, やわらかめ on cooked a bit on the soft side, etc


5

I think it's definition 7 from デジタル大辞泉 (highlighting mine) 7 それまでとは異なった立場に変わる。「賛成に―・る」「受け身に―・る」 That is to say that the 公明党 did not originally approve of the referendum. But because their position changed to approving the referendum, there are now enough votes in the 両議会 to do the referendum.


3

If I heard this in a conversation, I would definitely be puzzled and ask for clarification, too. Aside from deadly neck-hanging, TBH my mental image of 人を吊るす as a punishment is like this or this. Of course this is still way too much for a real kid, but unfortunately I have no further explanation for this. As far as grammar goes, I can assure your ...


4

願い叶うのならひと目でいいから If someone makes my wish come true, only a single glance will do, so (please let me see you!) ひと目 is "glance" or "seeing for a very short time" rather than "first sight". ~でいい is a construction to express your minimal desire. "(something) is not ideal but acceptable" or "~ will at least do". See: What is the difference between それでいい and ...


2

While you might be able to construct a context where the former meaning (that she'll do this more in the future) made sense, the latter (that she'll do this now) is much more natural given the context you provided. Translating very literally, the line comes out to: If I'm going to do any more than this I won't forgive you unless you* make it to ...


0

Difference のびる/のばす and のべる のべる has meaning as make flat something thick or fold. 空間的に長くする。また、広くする。 ㋐たたんであるものなどをひろげる。敷く。「布団を―・べる」 ㋑(「手をのべる」の形で)対象に向かって届かせるように手をのばす。積極的にさし出す。さしのべる。「手を―・べて助けおこす」「救いの手を―・べる」 ㋒かたまり状の物を、打って均質に薄く広げる。「飴(あめ)を―・べる」「金(きん)を―・べる」 伸べる/延べる(ノベル)とは - コトバンク On the other hand, のびる has wider meanings. But, のびる's ...


5

No, these do not mean the same thing. 部下は課長に残業を頼まれました。 部下 was asked by 課長 to work overtime. 課長は部下に残業を頼ませました。 課長 made 部下 ask [a third person] to work overtime. The latter is a "double-causative" sentence involving three people. The former refers to the same event as the following sentence: 課長は部下に残業を頼みました。 課長 asked 部下 to work overtime.


1

It means "transcription" (convert speech into a written document.) It is also called テープ起こし (from the olden days when audio was mainly recorded on tapes). It can be a word-to-word, or involve some editing.


4

実感 is "sense of reality", and in this context, it refers to the sense of realization that he is her father. 欠ける is "to lack/miss/disappear", and ていく is "over time" and/or "away from me". So the sentence is saying that, because she is seeing the situation sarcastically, she is becoming more and more unsure if she can accept him as her father. The more she is ...


7

悪いとは思うけれど here means "I do feel sorry [for what we're doing to you], but" The wife, who says this line, is expressing her apologetic feelings to the McDonald's girl. To paraphrase a little, she's essentially saying "Sorry you ended up being the one that we robbed, but the bakery wasn't open. So we chose this place instead." 悪い here is a word that expresses ...


3

That doesn't actually say ぐしう, it says ぐいっ. It conveys the idea of a sudden, sharp movement that is vigorous or strenuous.


0

主 (ぬし nushi) can also means owner. Maybe the people thought they had dropped something in the streetand you were asking who's the owner. It is also used to designate a person whom which you do not know the name and you are talking to. But in this case, an o is prepended: お主 (おぬし onushi).


4

No, doesn't mean "then" or "next" in a temporal sense. Depending on the context, the phrase you have quoted means either "the elderly man next to [someone]" or "the elderly man who lives [or lived] in the house next door."


1

Nushi (主 in kanji, ぬし in hiragana) means only one thing in Japanese: "boss/master (especially of animals/fish)". See this question. It's almost never used as a Japanese person name.


3

I believe "tch" represents a sound this character is making by pressing his tongue against the roof of his mouth and expelling a small amount of air; this conveys impatience, annoyance, or irritation. Likewise, the イライラ in the background shows that he is feeling annoyed.


1

First, please note the difference between もらう ("to receive") and くれる ("to give [me]; to do [for me]"). 贈ってくれる does not mean "I receive"; it means"[someone] gave me." This distinction makes it clear that the subject of this sentence is not "I," and therefore that it is not "I" who became good at drawing birds. With that in mind, since ようになる implies a shift ...


13

「のそ」 is an onomatopoeic word describing a slow walk, slow body movements, etc. We also use 「のそのそ」 and 「のそりのそり」. You can forget "a moment later" for good.


3

~に: "in/into ~" 力【ちから】: "power", "energy", "effort" を: direct object marker 入れて: te-form of 入れる ("put in") います: progressive marker So ~に力を入れています means "[I am / We are] putting energy/effort in ~". Depending on the context, it can mean "[I/We] consider ~ important", but it's not a literal translation.


1

Xにとり has the same meaning as Xにとって, though it sounds more formal/stiff by comparison. Depending on context, it can be translated like "as X", "for X", "from the perspective of X", "on behalf of X", etc. So 「私達日本人にとり」 in your sentence could be translated to "for us Japanese". に‐とり【に取り】 [連語]「に取って」に同じ。「彼の成功は私に取りこの上もない喜びだ」 Source: デジタル大辞泉


2

にとり means the same thing as にとって. にとって and にとり both come from に+取る and are two different ways to convert に+取る to 連用形. It's very common in Japanese to use the 連用形 to connect clauses. The only real difference between にとって and にとり is that にとり is more formal. There's also にとりまして, which is politer.


2

It emphasizes the subjective nature of the statement. If one simply said なんか男らしくない人, that would be something like "a vaguely unmasculine person," "a person somehow lacking in masculinity," etc. なんか男らしくない感じの人 is more like "a person who seems vaguely unmasculine," "a person who seems somehow lacking in masculinity."


0

You can generally use verbs like adjectives in Japanese, like in 「わからない文章」. 訳が分からない is no exception, although 「訳の分からない」 may sound more natural in some sentences. Edit: A similar example can be found here, where 訳の分からない事を言う人 is used.


4

Bさんといるところを評価されれば in that context means "if I were to be judged [on my communication skills] based on [when I am with] Bさん" 「Bさんといるところ」 means "a moment/scene when [I] am with Bさん", and that moment is what's being (hypothetically) judged. To explain the context, let's say we have three people: the speaker, S some person A who S finds easy to talk to, i.e. 「...


4

「昔の昔の大昔、猿の尻尾は三十三尋あったそうです。それが熊のために騙されて、あのような短い尻尾になってしまいました。」 First, 「それが」. As you have said (or at least implied), this is not the usual "demonstrative pronoun + subject marker". 「それが」 in this context is used for its idiomatic meaning of "Here's the thing." This usage of 「それが」 is reserved for the start of an explanation of a negative event or experience....


7

訳が分からない (or 訳が分からん, わけわからん, etc) is an extremely common set phrase meaning "nonsensical", "puzzling", "garbled", etc. 訳が分からないこと or 訳の分からないこと as a whole means "gibberish", "rubbish", etc. (解る is another way of writing 分かる in novels and such.) 言わないでくれ is "(please) don't say ~". I believe you know te-form + くれ is a way of making a request. Naturally, ~ないでくれ is ...


5

挙げる is a simple transitive verb meaning "to nominate", "to mention" or "to list". (~て)くる is one of the Japanese subsidiary verbs. It adds the nuance of "over time" and/or "toward/for us" (if this survey was conducted by the author), but it may be left untranslated in this case. See: Difference between -ていく and -てくる In case you've missed it, this sentence ...


5

先に means "before" in this context. See: What is the difference between 前に and 先に when expressing order of events? 返る is an intransitive verb, whose subject is 声. 低く呟くような modifies 声 (i.e., "a low and murmur-like voice"). This 声 refers to what she said, "名前なら、ないわ". You should review the basic grammar of ような... こちらから訊くより先に、低く呟くような声が返ってきた。 Before I asked (...


2

There is not enough context, but the subject of やり過ぎる is probably the speaker (俺/僕/私). Probably the sentence is saying "(In order to solve the problem,) I know I'm doing too much (and asking for trouble)" or "Well, I am aware I'm doing something I'm not supposed to do (but I cannot help it)". I guess the speaker is trying to solve some big trouble, and ...


3

I understand this as, on the same day, there's going to be an announcement of abdication and <some other ceremony and 臨まれた> I'm not sure whether you're parsing the sentence correctly... 同日午後に「退位礼正殿の儀」の実施を告げる is a relative clause that modifies 「退位礼当日賢所大前の儀」. 臨まれた here is the honorific form of 臨んだ. (れる is the honorific auxiliary/尊敬の助動詞.) 天皇陛下は30日午前、[...


1

臨む in this context is the following definition from デジタル大辞泉: 3 その場所へ出かけていく。特に、公の、または晴れの場所などに、出席または参加する。 It means to participate in/attend a official/public event. The specific event that the Emperor attended is called 退位礼当日賢所大前の儀. From what I can gather it is basically an announcement of his abdication in the 賢所, which is a place in the Imperial Palace.


2

First of all, the second sentence doesn't look quite right: 私たちは生命の危険を失うおそれがあった。 = We risked to lose the danger of our lives. I feel like you tried to put two sentences in one: 私たちは生命を失う危険があった。 私たちは生命を失う恐れがあった。 Also, the way you translate a sentence is not necessarily the way you should understand the said sentence. To fully understand them, ...


1

This definition of こと corresponds to the 3rd definition under 明鏡国語辞典's entry for こと as a sentence-final particle (終助詞): こと 〘終助〙 ➌ 軽く問いかける気持ちを表す。 「お変わりありませんこと?」 And from 新明解国語辞典: こと (終助) 〔「事」に基づく〕 〔主として女性語〕 ㊂ 相手に質問したり 同意を求めたり 勧誘したり することを表わす。 〔多く、上昇調のイントネーションを伴う〕 【用例】  これでいい-  あなたもそうお思いにならない-  あなたも一緒にいらっしゃらない- So it ...


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