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0

も is a very common particle. Some describe it as "inclusive", and it's often translated as "even / also / too". In this particular context, the も implies that "even this suburb[an area]..." The underlying value judgment is that the subway is just so darn convenient, that it makes things so much better even in this area outside of the downtown. Side note: ...


2

夢に触れる is not a common expression and it's almost impossible to determine the author's intended meaning without referring to the entire context. From the context, I think the line roughly means "To what extent are you conscious of your (own) dream", "How much are you thinking (or doing) to realize your dream", or something along these lines. Perhaps just ...


4

Simply, it is な used as part of a na-adjective. Without a comma, do the following sentences make sense to you? あなたは寿司が嫌いなようだ。 You seem to hate sushi. 試験は簡単なようですね。 Looks like the exam is easy. If yes, the な in question is exactly the same. Of course, normally, no comma is placed before な, but since this 嫌い is modified by a relatively long adverbial ...


3

一つ(や二つ)では済まない, literally "(listing) one or two won't suffice", is a set phrase that effectively means "there are quite a few". Assuming ゴミの分別 is used for the first time in this page, it is not a common metaphor for something. It just means "separation/sorting of garbage" here. ゴミの分別をしてもらいたいです is "I (=Riku) want him (=Baba) to sort garbage", implying that's ...


7

「そりゃあ持{も}っているでしょうに。」 For the majority of native speakers, this is not a regular, "calm/relaxed" way to say: "(Yes,) I have (a) credit card(s)." That is why I asked above how exactly you asked your question that triggered the use of the highly nuanced and possibly emotional に-ending. My first impression when I read this question before the edit was ...


3

「奥手{おくて}すぎて手{て}も繋{つな}げていない」 「奥手すぎて」 means: "too slow in sexual developement and ..." The whole phrase, therefore, means: "They haven't (even) been able to hold each other's hands for being too slow in sexual developement."


8

The original meaning of 「雑草{ざっそう}」 is, of course, "weed". When used to describe a person, however, it refers to a non-star or non-elite type whose name no one knew at the beginning. The term is most often, if not exclusively, used to refer to athletes of mediocre ability. Those types, however, occasionally end up very successful for their "weed-like" ...


4

What you see is an appositive clause. For example, we can say in English: The fact that his fingerprints were not detected at the crime site did not change the conviction. The word "fact" just refers to the same thing the whole clause led by "that" does. Is the "fact" redundant, that is, useless? While it is technically omissible, the wording using "the ...


4

Your translation is correct, and どんな意味が込められているのか考えるもの(=形) is a completely natural Japanese phrase at the same time. Grammatically speaking, I think this is something called a gapless relative clause explained here. Other similar examples include: 英語を学ぶ楽しみ the joy of learning English (not "the joy which is learning English") カエルが水に飛び込む音 the sound of a frog ...


4

Your translation is 100% spot on. However, this usage of 考える is neither colloquial nor poor use of the language. Following your same logic, パッと見て何を模したかわかる形 would imply that the 形 is the thing doing the looking and the understanding, but we know that to not be the case. We know that the thing doing the looking and understanding is a general person, the '...


6

出るべきところ (literally "the parts that should protrude") is a common Japanese euphemism for (usually female) breasts and hips. It's a paraphrase of 胸や腰など. 出る(べき)ところが出ている (literally "where the parts that should protrude are protruding") is almost a set phrase to describe a glamorous female person. メリハリの利いたグラマラスボディ modifies nothing, because it's just a predicate ...


3

報告書 is a formal "report (document)". A long report can consist of hundreds of pages (e.g., an aviation accident report). 日報, as its kanji suggest, is "daily report". It's a brief record of what you did or what happened on a day. It can be as short as a few lines. There is no common format for this. Unless your boss explicitly specified the format, a few ...


2

うなじや is うなじ ("nape") + や ("and"). うなじ and 鎖骨 are the subjects of the sentence. The simplified version of the sentence is うなじや鎖骨は色香を漂わせている. ~とは裏腹に is an adverbial set phrase, "despite ~", "in contrast to ~", "contrary to ~". So the sentence is basically saying that although her overall appearance is clean, her うなじ and 鎖骨 are voluptuous.


1

As far as I know, they have different meanings: 初めは At first. 初めに First / To begin with. 初めは is used to show how the state was in the beginning (usually because now the state is different) 初めは彼が好きじゃなかった。 At first, I didn't like him (maybe we are friends now, maybe not). 初めに marks a specific point in time (the beginning) where an action (as ...


2

北 is the cardinal direction "north". 北部 is a combination of 北(north) and 部(part), and refers to the northern region/section/area of a landmass.


3

When you pronounce や, ゆ, or よ, you’re basically making a smooth transition from い to another vowel. They sound very much like いあ, いう, and いお. That’s why いやだ is so readily reduced to やだ in colloquial speech. Likewise, the い in いよっしゃあ is just an emphatic lengthening of the initial sound in the exclamation よっしゃ.


0

経緯 tends to be used in more formal situations but has no poetic streak. In general, there can be a subtle--almost unnoticeable--difference in meaning between となってきた and となってきた経緯があり. But I believe there is no semantic difference in the case of the sentence in question, so the segment 経緯があり here is considered redundant in terms of comprehending what it means. ...


4

Your research is not wrong. 若者 is used to refer to young people in general. 若手 is used to refer to a young member of a group, and is often directly attached to nouns: 若手研究者、若手社員、若手俳優 for example. It is likely that in context, this sentence is referring to young people of a specific group. With no further context 若手 used like this is strange, and should be ...


0

I think your sentence is great. The only real choice left here is the tone you want to adopt. You chose a polite form of speech with lots of glue words, which conveys a certain signal. In contrast, if you chose a bit more blunt form, it can convey a stronger conviction, with more emphasis on "I". Also, since your fluency is already pretty high, I shall ...


3

Is it simply a more formal or poetic alternative to となり or となってきて? By the title, you are confused with combo of 「となってきた + 経緯」 and you feel the explanation is redundant rather than it is a more formal or poetic alternative to となり or となってきて , right? If I adopt this, the explanation is below. 「となってきた」here describes the moment of events actually has been ...


4

In Japanese, like in English, we can use multiple question words all at once in the same question when we want to ask for multiple bits of information. 誰が何を買ったの? → Who bought what? 誰がいつどこで何をなぜどのようにしたのですか? → Who did what where, when, in what way, and why? In your question, the writer has combined 「何」(what) and 「どう」(how / in what way) to ask (though ...


0

In this context, 分かったよ is similar to "fine!", so indeed it can be used to agree to something. 分かってるよ would mean "I know", so it would mean something like "I know refueling people is more important than refueling the car" and implies they will stop at the combini.


1

I think your understanding of the sentence is basically correct. For the part of 「大人数で」, it is natural to think they ring the bell in their turn and throw some coins into the offertory box to make a wish for the new year at a shrine on 正月{しょうがつ}. I suppose it is not like trevi fountain where many people throw coins at the same time around the water fountain....


5

[都合の悪いところは破っておいた日記と一緒に持ち帰った]、小型デストロイヤーの足を見て判断したそうだ。 The "、" clearly shows that the whole 「都合の悪いところは破っておいた日記と一緒に持ち帰った」 is a long relative clause that modifies 小型デストロイヤーの足. "... the destroyer's foot, [which I brought back (from the quest) together with the journal...]" Without the 「、」: 都合の悪いところは破っておいた日記と一緒に持ち帰った小型デストロイヤーの足を見て判断したそうだ。 It can be ...


5

「これでもか」 is an expression used rather heavily in mostly informal speech. I would suggest that you think of it as an embedded question within a longer sentence. The 「か」 is indeed a question marker. This should also explain why the quotative particle 「と」 or 「って」 will always follow. 「これでも」, by itself, means "even (with) this (amount/degree)." So, what is ...


3

都合の悪いところは破っておいた日記: a diary with undesirable parts trimmed と 一緒に持ち帰った…足: legs that she took home together with (the diary) 足を見て判断したそうだ: She said that she judged it from legs All in all, "She said that she judged it (how much the reward should be?) from legs of the mini-destroyers she took home together with the diary with undesirable parts trimmed".


3

さま (様) just means "state" or "appearance", the same as 状態 or 様子. See the first definition in デジタル大辞泉: さま【様/▽方】 の解説 [名] 1 物事や人のありさま。ようす。状態。「雲のたなびく―が美しい」「物慣れた―に振る舞う」 It's used heavily in dictionaries in this way, and also in formal texts/presentations, but you're not likely to encounter it in everyday life outside of those situations. As to how to ...


2

In addition to 撫でる and よしよしする (良し) there is いいこいいこする (from 良い子). Also, there is a variant of 撫でる which is 撫ぜる. From that is derived the word 撫ぜ撫ぜ(する) (not to be confused with the 何故-derived なぜなぜ, as in なぜなぜ分析). By the way, if the pet comes to you and rubs itself against you, that is すりすり.


0

Im Japanese and just trying translation training by myself now; so, ill do some try. 六義園と言えば、speaking of Roku Gien park, そばに住むようになって三年ほど経ったその頃には、なかに入ってはじめて見ることができる庭園の手入れの行き届いた芝生の明るさよりも、塀際の、伸びるままにまかせている雑木の暗い木立しか、思い浮かべられなくなっていた that is a park where I started live nearby about three years, rebark my mind only through its darkness of trees crossed straighten as ...


2

A: でも好きな子ぐらいはいるんじゃないですか B: そういうのも含めて分かんなくなりました 誰も僕の話を聞いてくれなかったから You're close, but I'm going to break it down just a little bit, and see if I can help with this. I'll start with person A: でも- But 好きな子- A 'child' (subject) likes. As you have noted in your translation, they aren't talking about a child, but rather a girl, as this seems to be a ...


18

If the question "May I pet the dog?" means "May I stroke the dog gently?", then none of the phrases you obtained from your sources look good. 「可愛{かわい}がる」 is the closest if not very good. The other two 「飼{か}う」 and 「ペットにする」 are simply out of the question. My own recommendations as a Japanese-speaker would be: 「軽{かる}くなでてもいいですか。」 「ちょっとなでてもいいですか。」 ...


3

It's funny because my mother language is not English (or Japanese) and I remember being very confused when I encountered for the fist time the English verb "to pet". Because it's so imprecise ! Do you want to touch the dog ? Stroke the dog ? Play with the dog ? So it's the same in Japanese, "to pet" doesn't really exist, you just state what you actually ...


1

調子に乗る is an expression meaning "to get carried away," "to get caught up in the moment," or a variety of other possible English translations. Sometimes particles like に are omitted in casual Japanese.


1

"By that time wed been in the district for three years, and the name 'Rikugien' brought to mind not the tidy, sunlit lawns seen by visitors, but the dark tangles along the walls" Probably the translator wanted to make it shorter and simple than literal translation like mine. They do not emphasize the scenery after entering inside ,but rather talking about ...


2

There are at least two questions regarding similar usage of など: Difference between と and や~など Towards a better understanding of など But I guess those are not what you are asking here. As for why it is used in this case, I believe it's an effort making trade-off between brevity and accuracy. Its connotation is something like: "there will be a heavy rain ...


4

「バスケやるのに理由{りゆう}がないとだめですかね」 Translator's TL: "To be honest, I'm not sure anybody actually needs a reason to play basketball." Your TL: "Do you really need a reason to play basket?" Both look "okay". To me as a native speaker, however, the nuance of the sentence-ender 「かね」 is considerably more important for a deeper comprehension of this sentence ...


-1

I think the meaning of this sentence is “you must have a reason in order to play basket” I heard from some animes and from the Japaneses, they end the sentence with “ですかね” with an affirmation meaning.


-1

As in the comment, 「体面を保つ」and 「面目ない」are common phrase. Let's analyze how it works. If CEO of the company does not wear suits and goes to an important meeting wearing T-shirt, normally you "can not save your face" :「体面を保てない」 as CEO since CEO has such a social status that they are expected to be seen as such. It is talking about more of ambience. It's like ...


14

早口 is a noun or no-/na-adjective that just means "talking rapidly". To use it adverbially, 早口に喋る and 早口で喋る are both okay. Among the three bullets you gave, 早口 covers only the first one. It doesn't mean someone won't shut up, either. To describe a fast-talking salesman, よく口が回る is a set phrase that has a mild negative connotation. 舌が回る is equally common and ...


3

能力や装飾を施す itself is simply "to add/apply ability and embellishment". 施す has several meanings, but here it roughly means "to add (some decorative element)". For example you can say 帽子に刺繍を施す, 重要な単語に下線を施す, 筐体に撥水加工を施す. AのはBからだ is a common cleft sentence used to emphasize a reason, and it's translated as "It's because B that A" or "A because B". For example, ...


6

No, and I think you could have looked up 便利屋 in a dictionary before coining random words. 八百屋 doesn't deal with eight hundreds, nor department store is called 部門店. 便利屋 would roughly translates to odd-jobber; they deal with all sort of chores, including delivery of small amounts, fixing houses and so on. Originally they refer to the job as an occupation, but ...


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