New answers tagged

10

The situation is complicated because there are several words for prince and princess. 王子 is the primary translation for prince. However, Japanese Emperor's son is almost always called 皇太子, not 王子. Note that this is a tricky title that has been given to various type of people under various rules (see Wikipedia). 皇太子 refers strictly to Emperor's son who will ...


4

I don't think you can find a lot of princes and princesses in Japanese 昔話{むかしばなし} (legends/folktales) to begin with. One example that I can think of is 乙姫{おとひめ} in 『浦島太郎』 who is depicted as a princess from the Dragon Palace. There is also 豊玉姫{トヨタマヒメ} (Toyotama-hime) from 『日本書紀』, daughter of sea god 海神{ワタツミ}. 姫{ひめ}(お姫様) is used in translated names and titles ...


3

It means "If you don't want this, I don't mind", but the implication depends on the situation. If the girl is trying to give this doll to someone (which is likely), the text means "If you don't want this, I don't mind (and I'll keep this with me)". If someone is trying to push this doll to this girl (which I don't think is very likely ...


1

切れ味 as a noun describes the sharpness of certain things like knives or mental acuteness. Thinking of it as "level" or "degree" of sharpness might help you better understand its use in tandem with 鋭い. Synonyms sharing the sense of sharpness of knives include 切れ and 切れ具合. You can say 切れ味のいいナイフ or 切れ味の鋭いナイフ, and they pretty much mean the ...


4

Assuming it was written by a native speaker, I would call this a humorous sentence rather than a perfectly standard one. The sentence literally does mean: それを専攻するのは天才でしかないよ! Majoring in that means [someone] is merely a genius! But it effectively means: Majoring in that means [someone] is nothing but a genius! しかない is normally used in a negative way (&...


1

These can all refer to someone who (currently) has tan lines, and in this sense, they are interchangeable. However, 日焼けあとが残る人 can also refer to someone who gets tan lines (easily) regardless of their current skin tones. For example, 日焼けあとが残る人と残らない人の違い means "the difference between those who (easily) get tan lines and those who don't", and in this ...


2

Yes, this ~のこと means ~のことを表す or ~のことである. In other words, it's a shortened way of saying "It means ~". The article says that the word 事件 usually refers to things like accidents, troubles and criminal cases, but in legal terms, it neutrally refers to cases/issues in general.


2

We sometimes use 〇〇祭り to call or describe (non-religious, non-traditional) events where you can see a lot of something. 〇〇祭り is also popular as the name of a sale/campaign (e.g., 山崎春のパンまつり). Among your examples, 美人祭り seems relatively straightforward because there are indeed many 美人. The other ones seem unnatural, and should be taken as jokes. These probably ...


2

一切 is so-called a no-adjective, and this の is a noun-linking-の connecting 一切 and 言い表しよう. 一切 means "every(thing)" in an affirmative sentence, but means "(not) at all" or "nothing" in a negative sentence (i.e., as a negative polarity item). 一切 works both adverbially (without の) and adjectivally (with の), so の is optional when both ...


2

A translation of your Japanese sentence would be: "Man, only a genius would choose that as their major!" If this sentence was directed at you personally, then: "Man, you must be a genius for having chosen that major!"


3

かもしれない with no extra element can represent any degree of uncertainty above 0% and below 100%. ひょっとしたら, literally like "if it were to happen", specifically implies a low probability. It is used with a connotation that the speaker did not recognize the possibility or evaluate it likely beforehand, or it is an unwelcome assumption, etc. By the way, ...


4

The word is 燦燦. Japanese of certain generations or above think of the song titled 愛燦燦 by the legendary singer 美空ひばり when we hear this word. Although the song was released relatively late in her career, everything associated with her is considered classic. This could be why the friend thought someone old came up with the phrase.


3

As a prior answer points out, 厚生 means "welfare". I'd like to add some sources to that, because I can see where you may have been stuck: how is "thick" related to "welfare", right? 精選版 日本国語大辞典: 〘名〙 (「厚」は加える、強くするの意) ① くらしを健康で豊かにすること。古くは政治を行なう人が人民の生活を豊かにすることをいう。 ※古文真宝笑雲抄(1525)五「福与二恩沢一也。富貴な人は厚生したばかりぞ」 〔書経‐大禹謨〕 If you see the ...


3

Your translation doesn't quite capture the nuance, which may have led to your question. A better translation might be "Taro and Hanako are just kids, but they sure can talk big". Note that のに is already being employed in the original sentence, just with くせ injected. The のくせに could be replaced with なのに, and the broad meaning would be the same, but ...


-2

It's merely a component of the word 厚生, which means "welfare".


2

This は is not a particle but a part of the verb 挟む ("to insert; to put between"). プログラム: "(event) program" (leaflet) に: destination marker (particle) 挟んで【はさんで】: te-form of 挟む あります: expresses something has been done in advance Stative verbs: ~ている vs ~てある vs ~(ら)れる How ~てある and ~ておいた differs? 最初からプログラムにはさんであります。 I have inserted it in ...


5

か is not just a question marker but also is a sentence-end particle used to confirm something with a bit of exclamatory feeling. This type of か is pronounced without a rising intonation. If your example sentence was pronounced without a rising intonation, it means the speaker is now certain that she is a newbie. Examples: そうか。 I see. / Oh is that so. / ...


1

This is less an answer than a guide to how you might try to read and understand sentences like these. It seems you're getting stuck a lot and having difficulty figuring out how to parse the sentences. So, let's take そこへゆくと、まだ固い莟を見つけ出して、これにあたたかい春の風を送り、花に育てる編集の仕事はそれ自体がひとつの芸術である The first thing I would do is just make sure I know how to read the kanji and ...


1

The topic of the sentence is 編集. It's the only は-marked word in the entire sentence, isn't it? Here 編集 means "(magazine/book) editor" (person). You need to notice this basic structure: 編集は、料理人みたいなものだ。 An editor is something like a chef. 編集 and 料理人 each has a little long relative clause: (...雑誌を作る)編集は、(...食卓を賑わす)料理人みたいなものだ。 An editor (who makes ...


0

I find what your book provided a bit confusing. So, I looked up this grammatical structure in one of my reference books. This is what I found: ... さえ ... たら/ ... ば They define the semantics of this as: あるものごとが実現すればそれで十分で、ほかはちいさなことだ、必要ではない、問題ではない、という気持ちを表す。 Several examples are provided using subtle changes of the grammar: あなたさえそばにいてくだされば、ほかにはなにもいりません。 ...


5

Grammatically, both a and b are possible. It is a matter of which situation is (by far) the commoner. 起きてほしい would mean ask mom to wake up; 起こしてほしい would mean ask mom to wake me up, of which the latter is the likelier.


2

The でん(と) is an onomatopoeia for (the subject presenting itself) grand or big. 構える here means ある態度をとる or simply to exist. The linked entries have relevant examples: 彼はでんと構えて動こうともしなかった He had 「planted himself in the chair [《口》 plunked himself down very firmly] and showed no sign of moving. 部屋には大きな机がでんと置いてあった A big desk was placed ostentatiously [...


3

If I have to choose between 原因 and 目的, I wouldn't choose 原因. 原因 indicates the cause of something. The objective is to earn money. So, as an objective I would say 目的. I would translate this お金を稼ぐため as in order to earn some money. Likewise, 学生生活を楽しむため as in order to enjoy life as a student. クラブ活動 here refers to activity in a school club. This is not ...


1

The meaning 2 is correct. In dictionaries, ても has an independent entry. It translates to even if, although. 1 未成立の事柄を仮定条件として述べ、その条件から考えられる順当な結果と対立する内容の文へ結びつける意を表す。たとえ…したとしても。「失敗し―あきらめはしない」「煮―焼い―食えない」 2 既定的な事柄を述べ、その条件から考えられる順当な結果と対立する内容の文へ結びつける意を表す。…たにもかかわらず。「知ってい―知らぬ顔をする」 3 (多く「にしても」「としても」の形で)ある事柄を仮定条件として認めて、下の文の叙述を起こす意を表す。「自信があるにし―、試験を受けるのはいやな気分だ」


2

Basically they are synonymous (souces: 1, 2). According to the web, チャック derived from [巾着]{きんちゃく} in 1927. Possibly because of this, in the idiomatic expression '口にチャック' = 'to be quiet', the other two cannot be used. Possibly for the same reason, チャック seems to fit better in some cases than the others: The zipper of trousers is usually called チャック; When a bag ...


1

角【かど】が立つ【たつ】 is an idiom that means "may get on other's nerves (unintentionally)". The literal meaning is something like "to become angular/pointed". For example, 角が立たないような話し方をする means to speak politely and euphemistically avoiding any expressions that may make the listener upset.


1

ンな is a corrupted version of そんな. It sounds a little offensive and is typically used when the speaker is irritated. Ordinary Japanese words don't start with ん, but this is one of the rare exceptions that happen only in slangy Japanese. ン is typically written in katakana, especially in the middle of a sentence (otherwise this would be hard to parse). ンなやつ = ...


1

I'm afraid to say none of those 10 attempts are spot-on. "グレーかもしれないけど、ギリギリセーフ(だ)" as a whole is the quoted sentence corresponding to 思う. Let's not be deceived by the comma. セーフ in a context like this means "barely safe/acceptable" rather than "(perfectly) safe". ギリギリ intensifies this meaning. I suppose this is related to the ...


3

There are three similar-looking but different expressions. モテる: "to be popular (usu. with opposite sex)" (usually written with katakana; originally slang, but very common now; from the potential form of 持つ; for details, see the post you linked) 彼は年上にモテる。 He's popular with older people. 持ってる: "to have good luck", "to have that ...


2

Several websites (e.g. this) say the following: Originally 持てる is the potential form of 持つ It turned into the passive meaning, somewhat by extension, 支持される (gain support) Then further by extension, 持てる started to mean ちやほやされる(←持ち上げられる) = gain popularity. These happened in Edo era, and the katakana writing started in Showa.


4

という is not "in other words". Please read this and get used to how it works. This 気負い means "pressure put on oneself" or "(negative) self-consciousness" rather than "enthusiasm". (The definitions from jisho.org are admittedly misleading. 気負い refers to "It's MY job" kind of eagerness/pressure, not enthusiasm in ...


2

覚えていてください just means "(please) remember". 覚えている is the -teiru form of 覚える, and 覚えていてください is its -tekudasai form. In Japanese, verbs like 知る, 分かる, 覚える and so on work a little differently from English equivalents. The fundamental meaning of 覚える is "to memorize", and you need the -teiru form when you want to say something is already in your ...


0

They are talking about how much hair to cut. The man perhaps is a hair stylist and the woman is a customer. That (cutting up to your ear is visible) might be good to you, but you might realize this was too short after I cut that much. I see. Then I would keep my hair so I can tie them up on the back. Frankly, the man is suggesting cutting up to the ears ...


2

Nope, this is the usual その. It seems to me that you didn't parse the sentence correctly. You can understand the sentence like this (すべて国民) は、(法律の定めるところ)により、[その {(国民が)保護する子女}に 普通教育を 受けさせる義務]を 負ふ。 All people have the responsibility to let their children receive general education under the law. 国民 is the hidden subject of 保護する. 子女 are boys and girls under ...


3

Wiktionary's definition of その その人の。 それ以来、その姿を見た者はいない。 すべて国民は、法律の定めるところにより、その人の保護する子女に普通教育を受けさせる義務を負ふ。 where the antecedent of その人 is 国民, or each member of the collective noun 国民.


5

Please forget ~ないといけない and ~なければならない for now. なければできない is totally different from them. なければできない is not a special construction, so you can just read it word by word. 体験をする means "to have an experience", and 体験ができる means "can have an experience". 登らなければできない体験 an experience you cannot have if you don't climb it 登らなければ if you do not climb ...


4

This indicates a "five-day-a-week system". You need to provide the context, but my guess is this is referring to the 学校週5日制, i.e. the idea that the school week is five days long, as opposed to (for example) six days.


1

Thanks to the comments, this finally clicked for me. どちらかといえば (if anything) + むしろ (A rather than B) = if anything, A rather than B. In hindsight, this was really straightforward.


6

The word you are looking for is most probably 健康診断. It refers to a general health check-up. 検診 is a more specific check-up that aims to detect a particular disease, such as cancer as in the case of がん検診. Some 検診 may be included in 健康診断. 身体検査 has some overlap with 健康診断 but its focus is more on body measurement and simple fitness test than medical examination. ...


3

そして、子供は、そういう大人の生活の知恵を敏感に知っていて。。。 ...therefore the kids are sensitive to the wisdom life and they know it of the beforementioned adult It seems you're not parsing the sentence correctly. How about parsing it like this: そして、子供は、そういう(大人の)「生活の知恵」を(敏感に)知っていて。。。 そういう modifies the noun phrase 生活の知恵 "wisdom in living". 敏感に modifies the verb phrase 知っていて....


6

I haven't watched the show at all so it's possible that I'm totally wrong, but given the background: 甲斐 and 幸村 are new partners 幸村 and 上杉 were old partners in other words, 幸村 : 上杉 = 甲斐 : 幸村 And what the previous two lines say, without omission, are: (私[幸村]は上杉に)弁明の機会を与える。 (あなた[幸村]は上杉に)す(=弁明の機会を与える)べきじゃない。 Then this line is possibly intended to be: 私[幸村]...


1

From the text can tell that 甲斐's way of doing thing is "地検に告発を" without informing the culprit before(その前に本人と話さない). But 幸村 thinks culprit should be informed before(その前に本人と話す) to have a chance to explain him/herself(弁明の機会を与える), and this is 幸村's way of doing things(私のやり方よ). 甲斐 don't agree with 幸村's way. So what 幸村 assumes(私が犯人だったとしても?) is: if I were ...


1

One possibility I can think of is that she is presenting the hypothesis that she is the sole culprit, in which case Uesugi would not be part of it and therefore deserve a chance to explain himself. She could be asking if he would still stop her from giving Uesugi that chance. For #1 to be plausible, the two at the scene must be in such a relationship that (...


0

いや means "unpleasant" よ in this context means "it is" ね is used at the end of a sentence to solicit the listener's agreement with the speaker. Put together the whole is "it's unpleasant, isn't it?"


2

No, it cannot mean/indicate physical face, as far as I aware. That synonyms are really just for "外から見たものの様子のこと", and that's also why there's "メンツ・面子" is in that synonyms list (Also in 世間の風評, 会合や事業などに参加する人々のこと.) The only real synonyms I can think of for 面子 is "面目" and "体面" for "save/lose face", "prestige&...


4

Yes, it's the te-form of 回る. This 回ってくる means "(for a task/role) to come (in turn)". 回る 6 物事が順に移る。「仕事が―・ってくる」「週単位で当番が―・る」 The やすい construction is also important. Besides, 叱る is not "to scream" but "to scold". (叫ぶ is a different word with a different kanji.) So: 母親に叱る役割がまわってきやすいのです。 (It's that) the role of scolding can easily ...


4

フォローする as a Japanese verb also means "to make up for one's mistake", "to lend a hand (after something undesirable happens)" or "to give follow-on support". 失敗してもフォローするので、思いきってやってください。 Even if you fail, I can give a hand (and make up for the mistake), so just go for it. Imagine someone who watches over you from behind and lends ...


3

As @aguijonazo points out in their comment, the third entry on your linked Weblio page of 手前 is what you are looking for. In this sense the word means "appearance", something that you've already done or a position that you have already taken, and as a result it affects other things. So let's look at the examples in that entry 言い出した手前、とても断れない [...


2

In the quoted sentence, 結果を出す means to accomplish (something) or to produce notable outcome. In concrete terms, for a football player (of some type), 結果を出す means scoring or assisting goals; for an academic, publishing papers; for a salaryman, leading a successful project. So the speaker is undecided between changing jobs or staying to get something done (...


2

Maybe you saw ので ("because") in the sentence? Then no, this sentence does not have one. This の after 歩いていく is a plain nominalizer, and you have misinterpreted (or ignored) では. noun + では has many usages, but here it roughly means "With X" in the sense of "If X is used/chosen". スマホでは画面が小さすぎます。 (lit.) With a smartphone, the screen ...


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