New answers tagged

2

It is a less formal variation of それはそれとして. He doesn't have a definite answer if anyone asks how going out with someone alone and having a date with her is different, but, that aside, he still wants Mio to think she is having a date with him.


3

Depending on the context, きっちり could be translated as “tight”, “exact”, “punctual”, “proper”, etc. If someone is described as キッチリした性格の人, she would most likely be dressed neatly, keep things well organized, make plans meticulously, follow rules strictly, never be late to appointments, etc. In short, she is the opposite of いい加減な人. As C2 has learned, C1 and ...


2

As C1 wants to get sweets for the reward of showing around a magic school. It depends on the way of C2 saying though, it should be “shrewd” or “calculating” for the magicians‘ personality. Probably “shrewd” fits in the context since “捻くれた“ has been used after that.


4

This あんまり is a na-adjective that means "too harsh/cruel/extreme" or "more than someone deserves". It's typically used when someone needs to be punished but its degree is too much. It's a variation of 余り, but I personally think it's better to think of this as a different na-adjective that derived from あまり. People rarely say あまりだぜ in the ...


6

(Note I'm answering my own question in Q&A style since I thought this would be neat to share.) In order to explain this properly, I have to go into a bit of grammar first, including Old Japanese, but towards the end it'll be clear how it all connects. So in English, we form to-be sentences like "This is an apple." The structure of this sentence ...


0

IMHO, this really has nothing to do with transitive vs intransitive verbs at all. In my view there is actually a completely separate conceptual distinction between verbs in Japanese, which you need to look at instead. There are: Verbs that describe some activity occurring (which has duration) Verbs that describe a change from one state to another The ている-...


4

They must have coined that term to sound like [捜索者]{そうさくしゃ}, which means a person who searches for something or someone, often a missing person. The first character of the neologism is also pronounced そう and it is used in such words as [想像]{そうぞう} (imagination) and [空想]{くうそう} (daydream). Though no such word as 想索 exists, when native speakers see those Chinese ...


1

生まれ変わることがあるなら doesn’t itself say who’s the one to be reborn. It could be either (1) him, (2) her, (3) a third person, or (4) a person in general. The context seems to rule out the first and third options. If he had said 生まれ変わるなら, instead, we could safely rule out the fourth option, too, because we would expect a subject to be specified in that case, as in ...


0

I have a feeling 生まれ変わる is referring to reincarnation. If there is such a thing as her being reincarnated and coming back into this world, he wants to tell her, don't be late (come back soon).


1

I've also read that the te-form of intransitive verbs with いる describe a state that holds after said change occurs. As a native speaker, I can say that this definition is correct but too narrow in scope; the case you raised with 泣いている is perfectly valid. I would map "ている" to english persent-perfect form, "has been" "have been". ...


4

図 ("zu") is a word that primarily refers to technical diagrams and illustrations. A typical 図 is something shown in this page: Technical illustrations are also 図, but artistic illustrations are not. The English word "figure" has many meanings. 図 refers to "figure" as in "This research paper has one table and four figures&...


2

Both sentences would do perfectly fine without それこそ. We could say its sole function in these contexts is to add emphasis. In the first example, the speaker emphasizes how much his friends have come to mean to him. He does so by saying, following それこそ, he cannot even imagine a life without them now. It’s like saying they mean “precisely” that much. What he ...


0

The Kanji Learner's Course lists this kanji with the keyword "drawing". It's not strictly the meaning of the kanji, but most of the time words containing 図 will be related to that meaning. Kanji, in general, don't have a meaning directly translatable to English. Some examples: 図書館 (toshokan) Library 図鑑 (zukan) Pictorial book 図表 (zuhyou) Diagram


5

The basic meaning of それこそ is "exactly that", but I think you're seeing a derivative usage of this. This type of それこそ is used in the context of reinforcing the speaker's opinion or correcting someone's knowledge by emphatically presenting an extreme-sounding fact or (counter-)example. It's interchangeable with むしろ. The nuance is "rather", &...


5

買い込む is the most neutral of the three. It simply refers to the act of buying something in large quantities for future use. It may be for normal consumption and the stock may last only for a few days. 買い溜め is usually used in this noun form, although the verb form 買い溜める is also possible. It refers to the act of buying something in large quantities and keeping ...


1

If you're asking this, your Japanese is pretty good! That said, ~てくる、in this context, means that the author is being reflective, looking at self outside in. It also implies gradual, not sudden, change in emotions. It's the difference between I'm crying. and (when I came to it, I realized) I found tears flowing down my face. 笑みがこぼれてくる、is like, I found myself ...


0

Your translation itself seems reasonable to me. He is comparing someone's appearance with his daughter's tears. More context is needed because something very unusual seems to be happening here, but assuming he's doing 女装, maybe he's trying to say "my appearance may be outlandish but it's as beautiful/precious as my daughter's tears" or something ...


5

In general, the original verb covers a much broader range of meanings than its 取り counterpart. This means you would have to learn the specific sense of each 取り verb, anyways. So I would suggest you continue treating them as separate words. Of the examples you listed, I would recognize only 取り揃える and, to a lesser degree, 取り仕切る as cases where 取り is used as a ...


2

I think your understanding is correct. 族 is hardly ever used by itself, except as the colloquial short form of 暴走族, in which case it is pronounced with a low-high pitch pattern, rather than normal high-low. Though these things get lost in translation, I would guess the word choice was due to the fact that 家族 ends with it. 家族も族だ is like saying 家族 is one of ...


2

I would translate the given English translation back to Japanese as: 息子の成績がどんどんよくなっています。 I mostly agree with you on both #1 and #2 about the original Japanese sentence. It should be understood as “My son’s grades will gradually improve.” The current grades obviously have room for improvement but the sentence doesn’t say anything that indicates they are “...


4

噴飯もの is a phrase used when one thinks something is absurd. It literally means something that makes one spit out food (laughing). The second person sees wordplay between ご飯 and 噴飯 and points that out using the verb 掛かる. The first person, in turn, sees wordplay in the use of that verb because when you spit out food, it will splash over things, and the same ...


3

There are many answers covering this piece of grammar called rhetorical negative, like this one I asked myself over 3 years ago... Basically adding 「じゃない」 or 「(な)の/ん+じゃない」 to the end of a sentence can turn it into a rhetorical negative. exploring your example: マリオさん!ひどいです。 - Mario-san! That's cruel. / You are cruel. マリオさん!ひどくないです。- Mario-san! That's not ...


10

~でいい (or ~で大丈夫, etc) is an expression that means "~ is acceptable (if not ideal)". I think this is something you can learn by rote. See: What is the difference between それでいい and それがいい here? Maggie Sensei: Noun + で(も)いい VS +がいい So the literal translation is: 私でよければ入部させてください。 If I'm acceptable (to you), let me join the club. And the implication ...


3

This オチ is "(unfavorable but easily expected) outcome" rather than "punchline". In particular, ~のがオチだ is a common set phrase that means "Surely it'll end up (something bad)" or "(Something bad) is all you can expect". See the second definition here, and the following monolingual dictionary definition. 落ち 3 行き着くところ。結末。 ...


0

EDIT: Now that it's clearer that you're asking about the 選べ rather than the 来れば, ignore the next paragraph and skip to the end. While え-form can indeed imply imperative, if it's ~えば then that's a provisional ("if") form, i.e. it means "If you came to my place ..." and in this context it's probably been contracted from 来ればいい, which is used ...


1

ほど means "to the point where ~", "enough to ~". In this context, it refers to the previous line. 表に出す means "to publicize" or "to show something in public". 表に出してはならぬような声 is "the voice that must not be heard in the public", and it should refer to that "Fuwaa". Check the difference between 気になる and ...


4

礼楽 is a fairly uncommon word. It's not very nice to use such a difficult word to explain the meaning of an easy word... Anyway, here its meaning is more of "ritual/ceremony and music" rather than "ritual music". So it's one of the compounds that just mean "A and B", such as 男女, 天地, 山河, 妻子, 文武 and 見聞. Music played by a 堂 doesn't ...


5

交差点 only refers to "a place where two or more roads meet". Pedestrian crossings are called 横断歩道. Many 交差点 have 横断歩道, but they are not synonymous. 交差点 safely encompasses small ones, but I think Google Image Search mainly shows larger ones with 横断歩道 for two reasons: Simply, small 交差点 are are rarely discussed in the news or in politics. 交差点 does tend ...


1

First, please double-check the terminology. It appears to me that the non-bolded part is written in the third person's point of view, and the bolded part is in the first person's point of view. The narrator is a "third person". So this passage has a temporary shift from the third person's view to the first person's view. Next, the bolded part is ...


3

A pedestrian crossing or crosswalk (American) is a point where two lines intersect: a road and a designated area people can cross safely, sometimes invisible but can be physically marked. A crossing, junction or intersection (American) is also a point where two lines intersect, a road and another road. And when I look on google images for 交差点 I mostly see ...


3

なんかこれ変。 The statement "今日は大学の講義で日本状の経営について学んだ。" just doesn't sound right to me and I'm a native. I can see what it wants to say, but it just isn't right. Is this on some sort of textbook? Where is this from? At least it certainly isn't something a Japanese person would write. You are right to suggest 式.  Alternatively, 流 (ryu) would work too. ...


1

Let's break 予報外れの雨が降った into its two basic parts. The core sentence is just 雨が降った, "It rained." And so any translation should reflect that this is the underlying sentence. The second part is 予報外れ. This does mean "the forecast got it wrong". However, it's actually not a sentence; it's a noun phrase. A rendering that would better reflect ...


4

In my own words, 絆される means "to be affected by someone's strong emotion and feel like doing something one usually does not do" or "to be motivated to do something undesirable out of sympathy/pity". This may seem like a very specific definition, but this is what 絆される means. It's typically used like 彼の熱意にほだされて20万円の絵を買ってしまった. However, this ...


2

目を覚ます can figuratively take an inanimate subject in creative writing; for example we can find examples like 寂しさが目を覚ます, 閉じた傷が目を覚ます, 闇が目を覚ます and 月が目を覚ます. That being said, unless there is clearly が after 不快感, I certainly interpret the first line as an independent "floating noun phrase". 不快感 doesn't have a dream, after all. The subject of 目を覚ます in this ...


6

When you are waiting and you are asked to [そのままお待ちください], you are, of course, asked to continue to wait. But this expression is usually used in our daily conversation in the meaning 'Please wait just a bit (here)'. It seems to me that in most cases or contexts, そのまま (without change, as it is, as you are) in this expression does not have a special meaning. I ...


1

I believe the expression 「職員室に叩き出される」 here is a variation on (or at least the 「出される」part is influenced by) the more common「職員室に呼び出される」 ("to be called into the staffroom"). Students may 職員室に呼び出される for various reasons, both good and bad, but more often than not it spells trouble for them. The meaning of the 「叩き出される」 in this case would be much the ...


0

"ボケに被せる" is a behavior like, when someone tells stupid/pointless thing (ボケ) intentionally (to wait/expect someone is pointing out that it is silly (ツッコミ)) another one tells some more stupid/pointless thing (another ボケ) based on the former stupid thing to make audiences laughing more, since that response would be unexpected (or, very very expected.) ...


1

As far as I know, this is not a reference to some well-known episode. It's just his own creative way of describing the "beauty" of spring. Spring is the season when a new school year begins in Japan, and he somehow likes observing clumsy new students.


3

This should just mean "thrown/kicked into the teachers' room". Assuming the speaker is a student, he said this because the teachers' room is psychologically an unfamiliar "outside" place to the students. Of course something like 職員室に放り込まれるぞ is equally correct, but we somehow don't say 職員室に叩き入れる. EDIT: "Outside" may not have been ...


1

It means "It's (not the cat but) me who will be relieved" or "I will be relieved". Note that she explicitly said 私, followed by an exhaustive-listing が, which signals there's a contrast between 私 and the cat. If the sempai simply wanted to say "I'm relieved (after hearing what you told me)", this exhaustive-listing 私が would not ...


2

This あたる means "to treat [someone] [harshly]". From: デジタル大辞泉: あたる ㋓人に接する。人を待遇する。現在では、ひどく扱う場合に用いる。「つらく―・る」「家族に―・る」 Sometimes あたる means "to treat [someone] harshly" or "to vent one's anger on [someone/something]" on its own without saying 厳しく, つらく, 乱暴に, etc. For example, (切れて)物に当たる means "to lose temper and handle things ...


4

Google Translate may translate 英語, 日本語 into "English", "Japanese", but... The character 語 represents "language", so 英語 means "the English language" and 日本語, "the Japanese language". "Japanese people" would be 日本人 since "person/people" is represented by the kanji 人. 英語よりも日本語の[方]{ほう}...


4

I believe ごよう in this context is 御用. It means "business" or "errand". So「ごようは どちらです」means "what is your business?" or more literally, "your business, which one is it?"


9

ない is a slang, and means the thing/person/place is extremely bad, to the point it's absolutely and immediately excluded from further consideration, with no chance of reconsideration. E.g. if you say あいつはないわ, then it means your opinion of that person is so low, that you never want anything to do with them. It's used for lighthearted situations, too though - ...


0

In answer to your title question, noun+に has no special meaning at all. You should think of this に as working with the verb 徹する. This verb means "devote oneself to". The thing you are devoting yourself to is marked with に. 魔物が防御に徹するかのように動く。 The monster moves as though devoting itself to defense.


5

In "小さな頃" and "若い頃", the subject is omitted. The subject can be for example "私"(speaker) or "彼/彼女"(a person who is talked about). So, "小さな頃" means "私が(/彼が/彼女が)小さな頃". In many cases if you see adj+"時"or"頃", there is a hidden subject. In most of cases, the subject is the same as the ...


3

The first half of your translation should be right. I think you have a good understanding of that part of the sentence: ほいほい騎士団が誘い出された時点で By the time the knights were lured out, In the second half of the sentence, 半ば is modifying 付いている, which is the 10th definition on jisho here. So, whether they win or lose (勝負) was already half decided. ...


1

It seems likely to me to be a typo for 今さら言うまでもないのでしょうか, in which case the meaning would be something like "by this point perhaps it's not worth mentioning".


3

日本で "in Japan" vs 世界中で "throughout the world". Does that help? I think the difference here would be the emphasis that is put on the idea of throughout. Pick a different language, say German or Navajo. These two are languages spoken in the world, but not throughout the world. Yet, in order to be famous, then such a broad scope doesn't ...


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