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4

For yes-no type questions: 食べたの? 食べたんだ? Sentence 1 is very common, and sounds friendly and neutral (i.e., you have no prior assumption). Syntactically, sentence 2 may not be a question, but with a question mark, it sounds more like a confirmation with a surprised and/or accusatory tone ("So...you ate it, is that right?"). For wh-type questions (...


1

右折する、左折する refer only to cars, bicycles, busses, and other vehicles on road (I think airplanes can 右折 while on road, not flying) 右に曲がる 左に曲がる is used in various ways. この線は右に曲がっている。 コンビニまで歩いたら右に曲がってください。 鳥は右に曲がった。


2

You are over analyzing this sentence. だけは is not a special kind of grammatical construct. だけ is just a part of the topic of this sentence. The sentence then moves on to saying that the person in question doesn't understand this topic. In this case (only) themselves. Source: それでも彼には、自分のことだけはわからない。 Translation (gist): Even so (comparing to something), ...


18

「~~だけ + は + Verb + ない」 is the pattern you will need to learn as it is commonly used. It is an expression that describes the single or very few exceptions to a phenomenon. It means: "Someone [Verb] everything but/except ~~." Thus, 「それでも彼には、自分のことだけはわからない。」 means: "He, however, knows/understands everything but about himself." or "Things about ...


1

Because you are interpreting the English use of the word 'so' in your sentence literally as 'consequently', you are equating that to ので, but the result in your sentence doesn't follow the action/behavior. You can use だから in this sense, but ので doesn't really work this way. It is more logical. ので shows a natural or expected cause and effect behavior. 'I eat, ...


18

There is no semantic difference when they mean "to wake up (e.g., in the morning)", but 目覚める sounds more bookish and literary. In the most casual settings, people usually say 起きる or 目を覚ます. In addition, each has derivative meanings: 目を覚ます also means "to regain one's sense", "to recover from illusion", "to notice one believed in something wrong". 目覚める also ...


3

つい doesn't necessarily stand for habit but that you do something unintentionally. がち stands for tendency and means that something is expected to happen to some extent frequently, whether it's intentional or unintentional.


1

To my surprise, someone asked exactly the same thing one year ago, but I'm going to focus more on their difference. They are a bit more nuanced than "precisely because" for each. Especially the speaker's attitude is always woven into those expressions. XだけにY: "considering how much X, (it's natural that / unavoidably / admittedly / I can't help but say) Y" ...


2

A phrase like this can be asked a lot of ways, in a casual tone. Simplest I think would be: xxって何{なに}? This can be used both for meaning and also identification of objects. If you want to be specific about asking for a meaning, I'd try: xxの意味{いみ}は何{なに}? Or, say, something with two possible meanings, I'd go with: xxって、何{なん}の意味{いみ}? or xxって、...


3

This is a matter of personal taste. If the author did this intentionally, I believe they were trying to emphasize the nuance of ひとつひとつ by covering various possible spellings. Similar examples include this and this. One may also argue that switching kanji/kana too much in a single word is visually displeasing, but I personally doubt that is the main reason. ...


0

According to this answer: "漢字{かんじ}ではじまり平仮名{ひらがな}で終{お}わる表記{ひょうき}が、日本語{にほんご}として読{よ}みやすいということのようです。"; It is because it makes Japanese easier to read. The answer had a link to the webpage where it was explained by a professor but it seems like that page is no longer or else I would have read the page myself. Source: https://oshiete.goo.ne.jp/qa/2185824.html


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