New answers tagged

3

If what you want to say by the word "hedonism" is: living and behaving in ways that mean you get as much pleasure out of life as possible, according to the belief that the most important thing in life is to enjoy yourself then you understand both words correctly. "Epicureanism" as an English word is a popularized metaphor which is often not even true to ...


4

The answer in the linked question basically applies here as well except that what comes before ほど does not have to be a noun for the sentence to mean "No C is as B as A." It can also be the attributive form (連体形) of a verb. But you can make your sentence structurally the same as the ones in that answer by nominalizing the verb with こと: ...


1

In my opinion, it should be 下手で当然だろ? (It's natural that I'm poor at it, isn't it?) , which can barely be interchangeable to 下手なはずだろ?, but not はずだよ. Neither わけだ or はずだ are really correct because わけだ (No wonder that's that) can only work when you provide information the listener isn't aware of or when you hear the reason you haven't been aware of, and はずだ is ...


4

「すらさえも」 is only a highly emphatic form of: ・「すら(も)」 or ・「さえ(も)」 Combining the two does not produce a "new" meaning of its own. You should, therefore, just think of it as an emphatic way of saying "even" in English. "Even the lolicon bastard who (had) kidnapped a kid kept making fun of me, too." The original sentence is in the passive-voice form while ...


1

家内 literally translates to "in the house," so even Japanese people feel it's a bit old fashioned (a bit like something an old-fashioned boomer might say). The most neutral term is probably 妻 which nuance-wise most directly translates to "wife" (vs husband), and you'd only use it to refer to your own wife. I'm Japanese American and I'd feel most natural ...


-1

I agree with l'électeur's answer. I think what's giving you trouble is the fact that Japanese is a (relatively) "order-free" language; since the particle words do a good job of indicating what's doing what to whom, the actual content of a sentence can be shuffled around like crazy and still make sense to a native speaker. That particular sentence is ordered ...


6

だが… わからないのは 現実{それ}を認{みと}められない自分自身{じぶんじしん}だ Your TL of that is: "However... what I don't know... is that the one who can't accept reality is me." I cannot tell if you are getting the grammar of the original correctly. The original Japanese is completely grammatical and natural-sounding. Nothing about it is weird or redundant. To me, what is weird is ...


1

I would translate as However... what I can't understand... is the reason why I can't accept this reality. From what I interpreted, he knows the facts that only the fighting spirit can drive him to face the genius. And the fighting spirit only doesn't give him victory. He thinks he knows these facts well. So, in theory, he should accept his loss. But he ...


3

However I initially understood it as: "Most of them are experts in using magic" I don't think you are wrong. Actually you got the gist except the actual sentence technically doesn't say so. 大抵 is basically a quantifier today whose core meaning is "most times/cases (of)" instead of "most part" or "most people". But when you catch any random guy and ask them ...


0

To the people who are also interested in this "disambiguation"... While I am still not a 100% sure I think I can now explain why in: 「大抵は魔法使いの エキスパートで―…」「大抵」was translated as "In general..." If we consider the defnition: たい‐てい【大抵】 の解説 [名] 1 事柄の主要な部分。「事の大抵を知る」 2 事柄のあらまし。だいたいのようす。また、全体のうちの大部分。おおよそ。おおかた (https://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/word/%E3%81%9F%E3%81%...


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