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-1

Both express a strong conviction but ぞ is often used by male. やばいよ。is softer.


-1

To me, やばいぞ, which I have already heard, sounds like a reproach or a warning an older man would say to a younger person. やばいよ sounds more neutral but I would love a native Japanese speaker’s opinion. I recommend you look for the topics about ぞ.


1

In Japanese 疲れる will only refer to the condition of being exhausted; So, if you say ずっと家にいて疲れた。(I'm tired/bored of staying home all day), it will mean that you are exhausted, usually either physically or mentally as a result of staying (ずっといて). If you just want to express your unwillingness to stay or dis-satisfaction of staying, we'd rather say, ...


2

How can I say "I'm tired of waiting" There is actually a special verb for this, machikutabireru. 待ちくたびれる. , "I'm tired/bored of staying home all day"? The most common thing I hear is something like "のがいやになった". 一日中家にいるのがいやになった。 (ichinichijuu ie ni iru no ga iya ni natta.) What one thinks of as most common may depend on the speakers one most often hears, ...


4

The best choice here would probably be 飽きる. 飽きる expresses that you have become bored with something. It is no longer interesting, you've had enough of it. e.g. 僕はテレビを見るのに飽きたよ I'm tired of watching television. うんざりする is an onomatopoeia. It express more emotion than 飽きる. I feel that うんざりis good when you are fed up with something which is negative to start ...


6

Yes, but のに appropriates for some verbs such as 一日中家にいるのに疲れる. When I read dictionaries, I noticed that these words "tired", "bored", "weary", "fatigued" are used in order to explain 疲れる、飽きる、うんざりする, so it may be difficult to explain the difference among them by using these English words. Japanese dictionaries say that 疲れる means "体力や気力を消耗してその働きが衰える", 飽きる ...


8

お気をつけください is a politer/more respectful way of saying 気をつけてください. It's the honorific 「お + noun form/連用形 + ください」 form. Examples: 「待ってください。」 "Please wait" (noun form/連用形 of 待つ is 待ち) → 「お+待ち+ください。」 「話してください。」 "Please speak" (noun form/連用形 of 話す is 話し) → 「お+話し+ください。」 「注意してください。」 "Please be careful" (for kango you generally use ご) → 「ご+注意+ください。」 Likewise: ...


6

After seeing the context I think it means... "Come to think of it now, there was something fishy/strange about it from the beginning (but we somehow followed the command)." The は is contrastive. It marks, or limits, the "scope" of であった. (部分的な肯定?) It's like "I must admit that it sounded strange/fishy, at least partially/to some extent, if not totally." ...


-1

To answer your question in the simplest way, I'd say "では" is a formal way of answering. ではある literally means "It was / There was" (pointing towards an inanimate / non-existent objects hence, ある, animate objects are described as いる). i.e. If i wanted to say "my best friend is not an otaku" i'd say, 友人がオタクではないです (いない) There's one more way translate it if you'...


0

There could be multiple ways of understing this. One way to make sense of it (perhaps a bit contrived) is to regard the part ending in で as a single object (a noun clause). The particle は turns that whole object into the topic of the sentence. For example おかしな話で would mean "the fact of its being a strange statement" (the specific meaning of 話 depends on ...


0

I think the reason why the expression of 「北風の強い」 in 東京は冬になると、北風の強い日が多いです。 is rather scientific reason than the syntax. We don't have to emphasize 北風:the wind from north in winter because the Eurasian continent is cold in winter and it it higher pressure than the area around Japan. Therefore, the wind blows from north(or north western) of Japan, ...


1

I can't explain in grammatical terms, but I would say I disagree with you in that 1 and 3 are similar because they both emphasize the "hair" to be the focus of the statement, whereas in 2 the subject ("A") is the focus. They all have the same effect in that they all convey that the hair of A is black but to me (a native) it feels like a difference of what ...


2

その is typically used when a speaker is actually seeing something near the listener. For example, an angry person may say (お前の)その耳は飾りか? ("Are those ears (of yours) just for show?"). So this use of その makes the message sound more dramatic because it sounds as if someone were seeing YOU and conveying this message directly to YOU (imagine that "I want YOU" ...


4

When it's used with a body parts and the message is given towards no one specific, I feel that it has a nuance of "your OWN (body parts)". So, その目で確かめよう is like See it with your OWN eyes or See it with your eyes. both translations make sense. This is often used in a TV commercial, poem etc and the message is given to anyone, no one specific. Some other ...


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