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がたい is really formal and limited in usage compared to the others. For example: 信じがたい話 Someone's story that is hard to trust or believe. づらい means that something is emotionally or mentally trying for the doer Thus 食べずらい would mean that is difficult to eat because it takes a lot of effort to get through it. にくい is the most general and often refers to ...


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They are not interchangeable. からこそ emphasizes a cause-effect relationship ("exactly because of", "this is the very reason"), whereas ときている by itself emphasizes some unexpected fact ("on top of that", "what's more", "you know what", "behold" or simply "!!"). I don't know why all the ...


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漢字の講義 and 漢字の話 are both correct Japanese phrases. 漢字の講義 sounds like a serious and academic lecture (usually oral). 漢字の話 is vague, and it can possibly refer to a column, a trivia, a discussion, a long talk, a lecture, or an entire book. See broken laptop's link in the comment section. You can translate 講義 to 'lecture' without thinking much in most cases. ...


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かぶり is an archaic word, and it's used almost exclusively in this idiom in modern Japanese. It's probably an example of a fossil word (an obsolete word that remains only in a certain idiom). かぶりをふる is a literary fixed phrase that only means "to deny/reject", and you cannot put another modifier like 横に in between. When the physical motion is ...


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They are heterographic as you say, but not synonymous. Since you already have the meanings pretty much figured out, there is no need to go into detail. To sum, 暑い describes weather/environment/temperatures, while 熱い describes objects. When you hear or see 「あつい」, context often determines which word is used. The Venn diagram below, copped from Wikimedia, ...


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although a common translation of ~ようにする is "try to" This does not seem true, and I guess from other questions you cited that it is because you perhaps confuse two expressions ~ようとする and ~ようにする, or two よう in them (they are as different as can (able) and can (container), and attach to different verb conjugations). ~ようにする is, literally parsed, "...


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As you've suggested, the literal translation of "意識" would be consciousness, awareness, sense, etc... However, in general conversation/writings, we tend to use the word ”意識” when we need to explain how our mind works (what we have in our mind to the object, how we feel for the things, etc..) For example, "政治に対する意識" means how we are ...


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You can actually write it in both ways, and they will mean slightly different things. 過ち will imply error in moral judgement. 誤ち will imply accidental mistakes. So it's better to write 過去の過ちを責めてはいけない rather than 過去の誤ちを責めてはいけない because in this case, you are not talking about accidental mistakes. Similary, it's better to write 計算を誤った than 計算を過った.


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過ち = your past mistake 誤ち = now mistake; normally used in text or books, not in conversation


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Well, I think you have explained most points on your own, so I'm just going to make good the rest: Grammar X に優れる / X に秀でる "excel in X" These verbs only take what field they are good at, and for comparison with others you have to add ~より or ~に比べて. X に Y で勝る "outperform X in Y" This one can have both the target of comparison and the ...


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