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4

あげく and its emphatic variant あげくの果て roughly have two meanings: finally; in the end; after all those ~ on top of all that; even; what is worse; not only that Some dictionaries seem to explain only the first meaning, but the second meaning is not rare. Here are some examples on BCCWJ: 確か、テンにどつかれた挙げ句に川へ落ちたのだ。 他球団のドラフト指名を回避させ、挙げ句に推薦入学を辞退しました。 ...


20

Repeating a word using は is a way to emphasize something. There are several patterns. X + は + X + が/けど/けれど works like "indeed ~ but ~" or "it's true that ~ but ~". X can be an adjective, a noun or a verb (usually used with に). See: What is the meaning of 「読むには読んだ」? and Need help with understanding X ことは X construction おいしいはおいしいけど、量が少ない。 ...


5

Background The first thing to be aware of is that this poem was composed in Chinese by the poet 于 濆 (Yú Fén) in roughly 874. (Brief Chinese Wikipedia article about the poet here.) As such, the Japanese version must be viewed as a translation. And if you've ever done much translation yourself, particularly of poetry, you've probably come to understand ...


2

ら is one of the kun-readings of 等, so there is no difference. The kanji 等 has several readings. ら: (attaches to person pronouns and person names) -s, and colleagues/friends, et al 彼等【かれら】, 君等【きみら】, 私等【わたしら】, 研究者等【けんきゅうしゃら】, 田中等【たなから】 など, とう: (attaches to other types of noun) and so on, and similar, et cetra 自動車等【じどうしゃとう】, 研究等【けんきゅうとう】 See: ...


4

食品, 食料品 and 食料 (食糧) all potentially have same referents, but the circumstances where you see those words are significantly different. If I restate their concepts in clearer phrases: 食品: items for you to eat 食料品: items for you to buy and eat 食料: resources to sustain lives 食品 is probably the word that covers broadest meaning to generally refer to foodstuffs, ...


3

Neither is better than the other per se, but there is a clear difference in formality. As usual, the kango version (死亡) is more formal, whereas the wago version (死ぬ) is more common in casual speech. See questions tagged with wago-and-kango.


1

I basically agree with the other answer. But, we need to connect them with the boxing a bit. I adopt the definition もったいぶらない ; doing something without hesitation/reluctance and apply it to the boxer. So, probably the boxer prefer to fight against his opponent very aggressively without considering stamina i.e. no hesitation. According to the wikipedia, I ...


4

絶滅: "extinction (of species)"; a kango technical term used only in biological contexts 消滅: "disappearance", "vanishing"; a kango used with various subjects in various technical/legal/academic contexts 賠償を請求する権利が消滅した。 台風は上陸する前に消滅した。 When someone says 消滅した種族, I would say it probably refers to a vanished (ethnic) tribe, because 絶滅 is the normal term ...


0

New answer Major revision has been made, in response to By137's comment, as follows: To begin with, consider the origin of もったいぶらず. Where does it come from? もったいぶらず, or equivalently もったいぶらないで, is an adverb which means doing something in a not もったいぶる way. もったいぶる is a verb which means that someone is unwilling to do something because it is もったいない. Next, ...


0

According to the category of 環境省, the ministry of the environment, 環境省レッドリストカテゴリーと判定基準 classifies the preservation status. 絶滅 is used to describe for the preservation status as "extinct". 「 我が国ではすでに絶滅したと考えられる種」 Species are considered to be extinct in our country. "Threatened" : 「絶滅危惧{ぜつめつきぐ}」 is categorized as hypernym of "Critically Endangered(CR) +...


1

In my interpretation, they suggest a different background / context. 絶滅 is group-wise (species) viewed from system, and it only talks about the fact, no implication for the cause. 滅ぶ is an intransitive verb so it implies a little bit of causality. (such an animal ate all their food source and break an food supply chain and cannot survive anymore, or tribe/...


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