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This is something that you will commonly find in colloquial spoken Japanese, but it is rarely found in written Japanese. The major exception to this is, of course, when an author is writing dialogue between two or more individuals. Here's what's happening, the speaker says: しょうがないですね? Then, realizing that the topic of the sentence is unclear, the speaker ...


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MERY [Mary] |女の子の毎日をかわいく。 What is omitted in this sentence is "する" or "しましょう". Most of the time, these sentences are some kind of copy-write and appear in the headline of an ad article or in a set of ad images. You can infer this from what the ad article is trying to convey.


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Unlike 戻る (which is a plain-form imperative), 順番 by itself is not a direct command to make someone move. In this video, the teacher simply reminded the students that there was something called 順番 that they needed to respect. Semantically, this "順番!" is more like "Remember 順番!". Likewise, we don't say "順番!" in militaristic ...


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This 謂わば literally means "if I say", but it is an idiom that means "so to speak". The sentence translates to "Between a joint and a joint, there is another joint, so to speak". This should be a reference to the weird modeling of the characters in FF7 on PS1. A human's joint (e.g. the elbow) is usually a thick part of the body, ...


0

"順番!" Taking Turns! = Kids on a slide など (everyone wants to go) Everyone Goes! = Kids lining up to get vaccine (nobody wants to go) Used by: Someone in authority (Mom, Teacher, Coach) 順番 is not turn however, it is an idea referring to order, an order of steps, or it could be turns for people. note in kanji we have 書き順. As for military usage, well ...


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The sentence in the title 順番、順番!on its own, Turn , turn!, except in an unusual context, such as a response in a classroom as to what this word is, etc, wouldn't likely be used, since it's a noun. For an imperative, a verb meaning to turn and with the word ending for the 'imperative tense' would be used.


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I'm going to answer your question anyway to the best of my ability, but I'll start off by saying you really shouldn't try to take English ways of expressing things and try to map them particularly into another language, particularly one as alien to English as Japanese is. The way the two languages prefer to represent things generally involve very different ...


3

I would parse: まず、(私が罹った)膵臓の病気っていうのは、ちょっと前まで(判明した時にはほとんどの人が死んじゃう)病気の王様だった。 The basic structure is: 膵臓の病気っていうのは、ちょっと前まで病気の王様だった。 "The pancreatic disease was the king of diseases until a while ago." The relative clause 私が患った modifies 膵臓の病気. The relative clause 判明した時にはほとんどの人が死んじゃう modifies 病気の王様. So the whole sentence means: "To start things ...


2

First sentence 私が罹った① 膵臓の病気ていう② の③ は④ ③ "The kind of illness"「の」here is used as a noun placeholder (the illness) ① "that I suffer from," ② "which affects my pancreas," ④+⑩ "used to be" (past tense because of the「だった」at the end, see next part) ちょっと前まで⑤ 判明した時⑥ には⑦ ほとんどの人が死んじゃう⑧ 病気の王様⑨ だった⑩。 ⑨ "the king of ...


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This みたい is the tai-form (a.k.a. desire-form) of the verb 見る ("to see"). The sentence may be easier to read in kanji: 見たい項目を選んでください。 Please choose the item [you] want to see. Note that a tai-form conjugates like an i-adjective, and thus it can directly modify the following noun. みたい meaning "to look like ~" has nothing to do with this ...


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