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So the structure is Noun は Verb (*i*-ending) Adjective この ドア は 開き 難い。 This door is hard to close.


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Hello my intuition is thatの方がis a locution (idom) coming from ancients times where (maybe) grammar and distinction between が/をwere not so precise. In french (my native language) we have such locution that sounds strange in today context but are used and pronouced carlessly.


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In a clause, both the subject and the object for 食べたい are marked with が. In other words, "(that) I want to eat fish" is expressed as 私が 魚が 食べたい(こと). In a sentence, however, you have to add は to either or both of the subject and the object. When you add it to the subject, the sentence becomes 私は 魚が 食べたい. Likewise, 魚は 私が 食べたい for object, and 私は 魚は ...


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Yes it's "attacks using armors", or more specifically, shields. From this blog article: また、盾は防具としてだけでなく、剣や斧などのように射程距離1マスの近接武器として使うことも可能。盾を構えて体当たりをくらわす、いわゆる「シールドバッシュ」ですね。 与えるダメージは極めて小さいですが、相手の体重(装備重量)が軽ければ1マスぶん突き飛ばすことができます。 Some other games (eg Dark Souls) have this feature.


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It's just as ShuaiJanaiDesu in that image says. The image means people who don't understand Japanese well thought Botan won a PS5 just by looking at the word 当選. Botan's original tweet saying 当選し was deliberatively left unfinished, and it could be either 当選しました ("I won") or 当選しませんでした ("I didn't win"). If there had been a comma after 当選し (...


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I think you misunderstood it. I do believe that たかだ is a name (maybe the patissiere's name or perhaps it is a type of parfaits since google search seems to suggest that) hard to say without context. The sentence can be parsed as: "目の前に たかだパフェ 置かれただけ" Which means: in front of you( or him/her) only a takada parfait was placed


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