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Almost everything before ボンクラ is a long relative clause that modifies ボンクラ. So the basic structure of the sentence is: どうせ <long description here> ボンクラどもなんだからよ。 After all, you (prisoners) are idiots who are <long description here>. The long relative clause contains several clauses: シャバにいたところで even outside the prison, (lit. "Even if you ...


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I started writing a comment responding to your last comment and then realized I was writing an answer, so I am just going to write an answer. Putting aside questions about what the most natural way to say this would be, for your given sentence 普段はスプーンで食べるがないから箸で The only reasonable interpretation here that the subject of the verb ない is スプーン. In the ...


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(私{わたし}は)12日間{にちかん}、日本語{にほんご}を勉強{べんきょう}しています。 (watashi wa) juu-ni nichi kan, nihongo wo benkyou shite imasu. You don't need to add 私/僕/俺 if it's already understood from context that you are talking about yourself. Apparently it can seem obnoxious. Numbers are often written as the actual numbers. If you are just starting, I really recommend you check ...


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Translation B is correct. Here's why: "Unknown" is in the passive voice, but 知らない is in the active voice. The literal translation of 知らない物語 is always "story (someone) does not know" rather than "story that is not known". This の is a subject marker rather than a possession marker. See: How does the の work in 「日本人の知らない日本語」? To say "your unknown story", ...


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Shichi-Go-San (七五三) is a traditional rite of passage and festival day in Japan, held annually on November 15, in which three- and seven-year-old girls and five-year-old (and less commonly three-year-old) boys, along with their parents, visit shrines to pray for their growth and well-being. As it is not a national holiday, it is generally observed on the ...


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