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2

Is it that 痛み is just the 連用形 of 痛む, but み in 温かみ is something grammatically separate? Yes, 痛み is the noun form (転成名詞) derived from the 連用形 of the verb 痛む, which derived from the i-adjective 痛い. 痛い → 痛む → 痛み 悲しい → 悲しむ → 悲しみ 苦しい → 苦しむ → 苦しみ あわれな → あわれむ → あわれみ The み in 温かみ is categorized as a suffix (接尾辞). According to some 国語辞典: み〘接尾〙 ❶ 《形容詞・形容動詞語幹に付いて名詞を作る》...


2

"All of the み!" 😄 More seriously, all of the ~み here are indeed just the 連用形【れんようけい】 of the verb-forming suffix ~む, with a base underlying meaning of "seems like, looks like, appears like: having that quality". This ~む is very likely cognate with suppositional and volitional verbal suffix ~む, which, via regular sound shifts, became the ...


1

This answer is written as a supplement to Naruto's answer and a response to some of your comments on that answer. To put it simply, I think you are expecting an unrealistic level of systematicity from semantic drift. The ways that the meanings of words change over time is very hard to predict, and can be influenced by any number of things. Assuming that ...


4

Have you ever learned classical Japanese? As is the case with other languages, the meanings of many Japanese words have changed drastically over time. For example, 貴様 was a honorific word in the past, as the two kanji suggest, but it is a fairly rude and rough word now. The meanings of the components of a word can be forgotten. (See this and this for ...


5

I don't know the "authoritative definition", but according to Japanese Wikipedia, 重箱/湯桶 words are not kango: 「雑木」を「ぞうき」と読むような重箱読みや、「夕刊」を「ゆうかん」と読むような湯桶読みは、和語と漢語を複合させた混種語(和漢混淆語)であり、漢語の範疇ではない。 I think this explanation is natural. They are hybrid words (混種語). Hybrids are hybrids, and you should not force them into the classic three categories. ケーキ屋: ...


9

If you look 迷子 up in a monolingual dictionary, such as 大辞林 or 大辞泉 for example, it should include a note like まよいごの音変化 (sound change from mayoigo). So yes, it was originally まよいご and changed over time.


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バスター is derived from Buster, which means "one that destroys, eliminates". It has the same use in English, like bunker buster, bronco buster, dustbuster, Myth Busters, etc. Some examples that are known in Japan would be the movie Ghostbusters and the pro wrestling move Brain Buster. It is likely that the meaning "one that destroys" got ...


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There’s no really “correct” or “incorrect” when it comes to ateji like 明日{あした} or 大人{おとな}, you just have to pick something or least bad. With jukujikun (kanji picked purely for meaning and not readings) it’s even worse since you may have not enough kana for the kanji. Some examples from Wikipedia: kera (啄木鳥, woodpecker), gumi (胡頽子, silver berry/oleaster), ...


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There's a number of words in Japanese that come from English, but not via the route expected. I suspect that バスター might be one such word. Poking around in Kotobank's page for バスター, we see that this is probably the same word that arose from baseball, as a corruption or shift from the original English phrase bastard bunt, in reference to a play where the ...


2

だ is an auxiliary meaning "be",a suffix for 體言(words do not have conjugations,like nouns), かめらだ means "Is camera" In のだ, の is not possessive, but "formal subject", a high-level abstract noun. It doesn't have real meanings, there it is because the sentence needs a noun from a grammar view. e.g. 行く, you wanna add だ to emphasizing,...


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