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2

You seem to be really over-analyzing this. It is only an 当{あ}て字{じ}. The plural suffix "tachi/dachi" already existed when Japanese was merely a spoken language without a writing system. We simply assigned the kanji 「達」 to the suffix later on. The kanji 「達」 does not have that meaning originally, but that is the whole point of 当て字. It is sound-based. ...


1

From an etymological standpoint, the character 素 itself originates from China. In about the 5th century AD, Japan started using Chinese characters. Before this point, there was no Japanese writing system, and modern hiragana and katakana are derived from the Kanji that was first introduced to Japan around this time period. From what I understand the ...


13

What is the etymology of the phrase 隴を得て蜀を望む? We can reorder the characters to get 得隴望蜀, which is a Chinese-language yojijukugo. This phrase may reference a few unrelated historical events. The earliest such event is about Emperor Guangwu of Han reunifying the Gansu region into Han territory then turning his sights on Sichuan (see Emperor Guangwu of Han's ...


2

You are essentially correct. The phrase おやすみなさい(お休みなさい・御休みなさい if you are choosing to write with the characters)is a conjugation of the verb 休む (やすむ:rest, take a day off, lie down etc.), from which the noun 休み(やすみ)is also derived. So, the link is a direct one. To be specific, おやすみなさい is a (one of various!) polite imperative form of the verb 休む. The なさい and ...


1

Flexibility in Japanese written forms Written Japanese has two layers to it -- the words as pronounced, and the words as written. This double-layering allows authors to play around with nuance in ways that just aren't possible in other languages, like 月光【ムーンライト】 or 巾着【さいふ】 or 紅葉【はっぱのはなび】. 熄【や】み in specific Your example isn't quite as much of a stretch, ...


5

Native Japanese speaker here. So as @l'électeur pointed out, 「人孔」 would in theory fall under this umbrella of a calque. However, in this case, 「マンホール」is far, far more common. In the 18 years I've lived in Japan, I've heard the word「人孔」exactly 0 times. That's how common (or rather, uncommon) it is. In fact, you said 「そこの人孔に気をつけてください。」 to someone on the ...


1

It's a thing in Mandarin world (Taiwan maybe?) to know several Japan region(Prefectures/cities) has unique emblem in its manhole cover(マンホールの蓋) design. As result, the term (人孔/人孔蓋) is a more used Kanji in Chinese instead of Japanese (人孔蓋 is a fairly common term in Mandarin news report that I remembered)


15

This is a linguistic phenomenon called "calque" or "loan translation". In Japanese, it is called 「翻訳借用{ほんやくしゃくよう}」. A calque is a word that has been borrowed from another language by the method of literally translating the foreign word "component-by-component". This is, therefore, a completely different method from homophonic translation (aka '...


1

My current understanding is as follows (thank you Yosh and broccoli forest for the insightful comments). デレる is an ichidan verb probably because it's actually an old verb coined in (or before) the 19th century, when the verb-coining rule was different from that of today. でれる did appear in several works in the 19th century. Although でれる was rare according to ...


2

It is indeed quite common to give names which are (partially) intended as names from Western languages, for example (女)えりか、えみり、まりえ、もにか、にいな or (男)れお、れおん、ろびん、れい、… Of course some names lend themselves to this process more than others and it is not at all uncommon to use kanji to write the name, for example 愛利歌【えりか】 or 玲旺【れお】. The child can nevertheless use the ...


2

Reading / Spelling As you noticed, 退がる is not a normal collocation of kanji and okurigana. Referring to my copy of Shogakukan's Kokugo Dai Jiten (online version here), 退 has the following recognized kun'yomi: 退る【しさる】 退く【しぞく】 退く【しりぞく】 退ける【しりぞける】 退る【すさる】 退く【そく】 退く【どく】 退かす【どかす】 退ける【どける】 退く【のく】 退かす【のかす】 退ける【のける】 退く【ひく】 退ける【ひける】 Despite the impressive ...


1

Some preliminary research: 日本国語大辞典 has an example sentence dating from 1813: 「ばばちゃんいやいやと云ってだだをいふだ」. Dictionaries do make clear that it came from さん, but none of them list it as 幼児語 (baby talk). One reason this might be is that it has become a standardized way of addressing young children and female friends, so it is no longer considered 幼児語 as everyone uses ...


0

In Lakota, "kana'" refers to "those over there" as a pronoun. In Old Japanese, "kanata" has this meaning and usage, which is closer to Lakota than Ainu, though there is no reason these peoples could not be related.


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