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1

I think this is not due to a shifted rendaku, but rather due to a change in pitch accent that occurs in all compound verbs (つたう{LHH} → てつだう{LHHL}). It’s difficult to say てつたう{LHHL} without the た sounding voiced, because the ‘a’ in た needs to be fully voiced to clearly pronounce the pitch drop, at which point it sounds like the ‘t’ is voiced when you speak ...


4

I researched and found some words which have similar meaning with these samples. 口ずから (by one's own mouth) 足ずから (by one's own feet) 心ずから (by one's own heart/will) As a different meaning, ず+から seems to lead a meaning of relationship. 隣ずから (with relationship of next to each other) いとこずから (with relationship of cousins) In my experience, these words I shared ...


0

It is because every person has a mother. The top part is 人. Every human has a mother.


1

This page states: 国語で、おもむき(余韻〈韵〉)を「におい」ということから、韵の省略形の勻(いん)の字形を変えたもの。 I had to find the proper glyph to copy from searching 余韻.


9

Based on the hint from @wip, I started to research and found a wonderful discussion. They have shared so many reliable sources but everything is Japanese and it's very very long so I'll pick up points relating to this question. About kanji variation. First of all, there were hundreds of variations of kanji of coffee (as a form of ateji) at least in Japan. ...


4

こき使う is a compound verb made of 扱く and 使う. 扱く can be read both as こく and しごく (こく is less common), but they originally mean roughly the same thing, "to rub/scrub", and by extension, "to work someone hard". From Compound Verb Lexicon: I don't know the story, but こき使う only means "to work someone hard". Do you understand 人 in this ...


5

Yes オーション is just one of the product names for flour sold by Nisshin. Information is limited because it's not officially for retail. This site seems to have lots of official information about professional-use flours sold by Nisshin, but unfortunately only experts and restaurant owners are allowed to access. Still, judging from this search result, I think it'...


3

言いだし is the continuative form (連用形) of 言いだす ([言]{い}い[出]{だ}す). Examples: dictionary form - continuative form [言]{い}う - 言い [出]{だ}す - 出し 言いだす - 言いだし する - し わかる - わかり 「[Continuative form of a verb] + づらい」 means "hard/difficult to [Verb]". づらい comes from an i-adjective つらい ([辛]{つら}い), "painful, difficult, tough, hard". The つ gets voiced into づ due ...


3

[嫉妬]{しっと}し [蹴落]{けお}とそうとする The し in 嫉妬し is the continuative form (連用形) of する. In other words, 嫉妬し is the continuative form (連用形) of 嫉妬する, "envy, be jealous". The continuative form of a verb/adjective can function as a conjunction to connect verb/adjectival phrases or sentences. Your sentence can be rephrased using the てform, as in 嫉妬して蹴落とそうとする, without ...


4

There are a few different elements, so I'll try to break them down for you. The first sentence 携帯あんだろ ? is a very casual/colloquial way of saying 携帯(が)あるんだろう? In other words, they are asking (semi-rhetorically) whether they have their phone. As for their second sentence, 通じる is a verb which can mean 'communicate' or 'get through' (amongst others), ...


4

In Japanese, phonetic equivalence is generally a very poor predictor of common etymology. Japanese is well known as having a preponderance of homophones, mostly due to the accretion of possible readings for each kanji which has developed over the centuries. But even among wago (和語), verbs ending in 'eru' are extremely common. Still, it is always worth ...


1

The word Oss most likely came from the Japanese Kyokushin Karate schools that would say "Osu no Seishin." In this phrase, Osu means to push and Seishin means to endure so the entire meaning is something like pushing and enduring, which is interpreted approximately as combat spirit. Eventually this was shortened into just Osu, and this morphed into the Oss ...


34

Let's dive into this etymology. (My reference, unless otherwise stated, is Shogakukan's 国語大辞典. I've got a dead-tree copy, and there's also a decent online version available for free via Kotobank. Note that Kotobank's layout is a bit confusing for terms spelled with kanji that have multiple readings.) Sense development さようなら Listed here as first ...


12

I agree with @MichaelChirico and @Earthliŋ♦. Let me add a different viewpoint. To say goodbye we often use many variant versions of "sayonara" such as: じゃーね それじゃーね それならね さらば These have basically the same original meaning of "さようなら". Direct meaning is "Since that is the case, (let's call it a day)" or something like that. I think it's also similar to "then"...


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