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2

One of the primary mechanics for showing politeness and respect in any language is the use of increasingly indirect expressions. Consider the following in English: Gimme that Give me that Please give me that It would be great if you gave me that It would be great if you could give me that It would be greatly appreciated if I could have that One would be ...


4

The word ashita is purely Japanese. The spelling 明日 comes from Chinese. A note about reading types For any word where the reading is the 訓【くん】読【よ】み, the word itself as pronounced is (almost always) from a native Japanese root. In these cases, it's important to recognize that the spelling and the underlying Japanese word are independent: the written form ...


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Rather than interpreting「食」as its original meaning eaten, it is probably more accurate to interpret it for its secondary meaning that developed in Old Chinese: wear away, corrode, damage [something]. This is the same kind of semantic extension as English (e.g. acid eats away at metal > corrosion). Thus, eclipses are a wearing away of the sun or moon. Apart ...


3

In terms of simple word origins / etymologies, we can explain that pretty easily based on available resources. Origin of itadakimasu <joke> This comes from the phrase [板]{ita}[[を]{o}][抱きます]{dakimasu}, and refers to the custom of hugging ([抱く]{daku}) a board ([板]{ita}) in appreciation of the table on which the food is laid. </joke> More ...


4

I won't claim any specifics for Japanese usage, but here's the Chinese answer from《{{kr:漢}}語大詞典》: 親王 皇帝或國王近支親屬中封王者。 其名始於 南朝 末期。 Very paraphrased translation: Those who have been bestowed the title of「王」that are close in the family tree to the [reigning] sovereign. The title was first seen during the latter years of the Southern Dynasties. ...


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When I first arrived in Japan in the summer of 1970, 山手線 was known simply as やまてせん - it (suddenly) came to be known as やまのてせん around a year later. Back then, I had never seen it referred to as 山ノ手線. Further, the area where we lived in Yokohama was also known as the Bluff, 山手, やまて, between the 石川町 and 山手 stations along the 根岸線.


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