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「モノ」「もの」「物」, There is a reason to use for each of them in many situation, but few people use them consciously. Therefore, there are many people who use them incorrectly. Some people use hiragana to soften the mood of a sentence. there are general rule. モノ: When it includes other meanings as well as the meaning of the kanji 例:ヒト・モノ・カネ もの: When used as ...


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In this context, katakana is used: プロ Examples: https://ja.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/プロ野球選手 https://ja.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/プロゲーマー


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It's not a common reading at all, and I knew no one whose name is 笛【モニカ】. If a real Japanese child had a name like this today, people would almost certainly call it a "kirakira name". But character names in fiction are often unique, and "kirakira name" is usually not used to describe such names, especially when the work is not set in ...


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This is a relic of the Chinese writing system, which some time in the past used the character 「足」 to mean sufficient, enough. From 《上{{kr:海}}博物館藏戰國楚竹書・䊷衣》簡11 (Shanghai Museum Chu Bamboo Slips, section Black Robes, Slip #11: 子曰大臣𡳿(之)㔻(不)⿱目辛(親)𠃟(也)則𢘑(忠)敬㔻(不)𠯁(足)而⿱富貝(富)⿱貞貝(貴)𢎟(已)⿺辶化(過) The Master said: If the ministers are not close to their monarch, then ...


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It's a great question. You might have already known that Japanese characters originally came from Chinese, so if you google "足" in a chinese etymology dictionary, you will find this 甲骨文中“正”(征)与“足”本是同一个字,后被转注成两个字。足,甲骨文(囗,村邑或部落)(止,行军),表示军队归邑。金文、篆文承续甲骨文字形。因为“疋”(脚,名词)篆文的字形与“足”(凯旋归邑,动词)的篆文字形相似,后人习惯于以“足”字代替本义完全不同的“疋”字,“疋”的甲骨文字形像由大腿小腿、脚板构成的脚部。造字本义:名词,...


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校 does not mean "exam" in the sense of students' written test, but it means "examination" or "investigation" in the following compounds: 校正 proofreading 校了 proofreading completed 校閲 copyedit / reviewing / proofreading ☆校合 collation (comparison of different versions of the same classical work) 校本 a survey book on different ...


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If their the "printed" form (I don't know the japanese word for it) you can use 辞書{じしょ} to either try to draw it or pick out components. I don't know if it can identify calligraphy like that though.


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There's 辞書{じしょ} (jisho). It's not always good about clearly identifying exactly what the difference is, but it usually gives you several examples that will at least give you an idea.


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This シメる is a slangy verb that euphemistically means something like "to chastise (thus making them understand who is the strongest)" or "to give someone a (harsh) lesson (about underground rules, etc)". Usually brute force is implied. It's 締める in kanji, but normally written with katakana. This ~て回る is just "go to various places (...


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Writing a foreign (Western) name in kanji for fun is not something an ordinary native Japanese speakers would do. We just use katakana for this purpose. That said, 来安 and 雷杏 both seem reasonable to me as a "kanji name for fun", and neither is more correct than the other. Many other kanji can be read ライ or アン, so there are many other possibilities. ...


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