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3

Aに続いてB is used to describe a sequence of events, with the implication being that the time between the two is relatively short. A is implied to take the same verb as B. From デジタル大辞泉: つづ・く【続く】🈩 3 ある事柄のあとに、間をおかず他の事柄が連なる。物と物とが切れ目なくつながる。「授賞式に―・いて祝賀パーティーを行う」「応接間と勉強部屋とが―・いている」「次ページに―・く」 In this case nothing is being said about the relationship between 貞操(...


3

You have parsed it wrong. The basic structure of the sentence is: きっとそれは X なのだろう。 Perhaps it's X. / I suppose it is X (and that's the reason for his problem). Where な is the attributive form of だ, の is an explanatory-no, and それ refers to something before your quote. And "X" is a long noun phrase with nested relative clauses: ((父の深いところにある→)傷に触れる→)なにか ...


1

I think なにか + なの + だろう is the correct parsing. Here, なにか is a noun, meaning something. In kanji, it is「何か」. なの is actually a composition of だ+の, where .. だ is the same だ as in 「今日はいい日だ。」「明日は休みだ。」 の wraps the preceding sentence as a noun clause. To connect to this の, だ is conjugated to な。 だろう indicates that the speaker/author guesses so. The structure of ...


3

There is no omitted particle. 少女と言っていい ("where it's good to say girl"; "safely called a girl") is a relative clause that modifies 歳 ("age"). 大人と言っていい人 a person who you can call an adult 少女と言っていい歳 an age which you can call a shōjo('s age) As for the difference between 少女 and 女の子, 少女 is a relatively literary word for a girl roughly between 8 and 17. 女の子 also ...


1

I am afraid you are misinterpreting some things that you did not ask about in your questions, so I will give you my translation first: 下手に俺を残して手柄を奪われても困ると判断したか Did he (=the commander) figure that it would be annoying if he carelessly left me (in the main army) and got his credit stolen (by me)? あるいは伏兵処理に赴いた人間は全員退却させる事で部下思いの指揮官を演出したいのか Or is it ...


4

らした is a less formal, contracted form of いらした, which is a variant of いらっしゃった. Here the meaning is the same as 不安になっていらしたのでは or 不安になっていらっしゃったのでは. And this じゃありません is indeed like "..., didn't you?" or "It's that ~, isn't it?". Put together: ...だから不安になってらしたのじゃありません? ...and thus you got worried, didn't you? / right?


2

Your translation seems okay. To break it down: 意外だ: "is unexpected" 意外そうだ: "looks unexpected" 意外そうではない: "does not look unexpected" 意外そうではなく: (ku-form of 意外そうではない) "not looking unexpected" 意外そうでもなく: "not (quite) looking unexpected" さして意外そうでもなく: "not really looking unexpected" For the last も, see: も in 「Vのもアレなんだけど」 What is the difference between 「とは限らない」and ...


1

No. 奪われて in 手柄を奪われても困る is the passive voice, not the honorific passive: The Commander does not want the MC to be credited with the victory. In other words, the Commander will feel uncomfortable (困る) if the credit for the victory is stolen by the MC (手柄を奪われても). Yes. The Commander let the MC stay (俺を残して). Hope someone has the answer. Yes. The Commander himself/...


2

For 1. This 反動{はんどう} describes mental state, a qualitative reaction. Working on the magic towards others is stressful to the agent. So, an agent get "great counter-action : 「大きな反作用」" by "the stress :「反動」" he/she feels. This で used here is the following : 動作・作用の原因・理由を表す。「受験勉強で暇がない」「君のおかげで助かった」 For 2. I think "the direct method" : 言葉による洗脳や肉体的な躾け is effective ...


2

It can be parsed more easily if you know that: ~と聞かない ~と言って聞かない and their variations are an idiomatic expression to mean "stubbornly persist that —", literally "saying that — and don't listen". 聞かず is the proper continuative form (中止法) of 聞かない (you can use neither 聞かないで nor 聞かなくて here). It chiefly describes that one insists on something ...


0

At most 4 different people can be involved in the phrase: (Aは)突然自らも(Bに)同行すると(Cに)言い出して(Dの言うことを)聞かず A suddenly said to C that himself/herself would go with B, not hearing what D said What is true is that A is the one 同行する (go together), 言い出す (say/propose), and 聞かない (not hear/ignore). What is also true is that A is not B, nor C, nor D. However, without ...


3

In 明鏡’s definition for 下: ❺ 地位・能力・程度・年齢などが劣っていること。また、その人。 「3歳下の弟」 Namely, 下 can refer to the fact that someone’s position, ability, level, or age is lower. In your case it’s age. In the example it uses 歳 instead of つ for the counter, but つ (as well as 個) work for age just fine, albeit slightly informal.


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