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I think your sentence is great. The only real choice left here is the tone you want to adopt. You chose a polite form of speech with lots of glue words, which conveys a certain signal. In contrast, if you chose a bit more blunt form, it can convey a stronger conviction, with more emphasis on "I". Also, since your fluency is already pretty high, I shall ...


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「これでもか」 is an expression used rather heavily in mostly informal speech. I would suggest that you think of it as an embedded question within a longer sentence. The 「か」 is indeed a question marker. This should also explain why the quotative particle 「と」 or 「って」 will always follow. 「これでも」, by itself, means "even (with) this (amount/degree)." So, what is ...


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寂しい just means lonely; you can miss some specific person without being lonely in general. Often, the meaning of "I miss you" is expressed with 会いたい. It appears in songs quite a lot (君を会いたくて、会いたくて). But of course that is literally about wanting to get together, not about the feeling of that person lacking, which are not exactly the same. The problem is that ...


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会いたい in the literal sense means 'I want to meet', it is something you would say to close friends or a partner. The meaning is closer to 'I miss you'. You probably would not want to say this if you wanted to meet friends that you see regularly to hang out together. 寂しい translates literally as 'lonely' although in this context can be understand as'I feel ...


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As with many things in Japanese (informal language in particular), this is based on context. If you meet someone for the first time in a while, it would make sense to ask them if they are well, rather than asking them if they think you look well. Pronouns are often dropped when it is obvious who is being refereed to. Unlike many other languages there is no ...


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