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3

This あたり refers to a location around something. The question you linked is using あたり in a more abstract sense, but in your case, it simply refers to a physical location on screen. The author is saying "The place around the lines that say ignoring nonexistent directory "/dammy/xxx" seems relevant". Since this is an output from a program, he used という, but ...


2

気にする is transitive (する is transitive here), so you use を: 私は(が*)それを気にしません。 The を can be replaced by は when それ is thematic or contrasted: それは私は(が*)気にしません。 As an aside: Grammatically speaking you can use それが with intransitive 気になる (なる is intransitive), as in: (私は/私には)それが気になりません。 *For the difference of が and は, this thread might be of help: What&#...


3

不変性 is "immutability" and 不変的なもの is "immutable things", which refers to things that do not change over time. It's not a very common word, and as far as I know, it does not have a tricky meaning in the field of music. So you have to figure out its implication from the interview itself. They are basically talking about how 不変性 is not important to the ...


5

You can say 百七十ちょい (very casual), 百七十ちょっと (casual), 百七十あまり and 百七十強(きょう) (formal). You can also say 百七十幾つ(ひゃくななじゅういくつ) and 百七十幾ら(ひゃくななじゅういくら), but you cannot use a counter (e.g., 通) with them. 百七十数通(ひゃくななじゅうすうつう) is also acceptable, but it's less common than the others presumably because 170 is already specific enough. 百数十通 is common (roughly between 110 and ...


3

Off the top of my head, 約【やく】170 大雑把【おおざっぱ】に170くらい 170あまり (implies slightly more than 170) 170弱【じゃく】 (implies slightly less than 170) アバウト170 (just kidding)


4

I believe Japanese children do not use special mnemonics. I mastered the sequences of あかさたなはまやらわ, いきしちにひみいりい, うくすつぬふむゆるう, えけせてねへめえれえ and おこそとのほもよろを using the latter half of this children's song (written by a famous poet), and this was probably when I was a kindergartner. I still clearly remember these five sequences almost like standard words, although I ...


0

I don't know what phrase is used by Japanese children but the sequence あかさたなはまやらわ is called go-juu-on (五十音). Wikipedia has these ones: Ah, Kana Symbols: Take Note How Many You Read Well. and Ah, Kana. Surely Take Note How Many You Read Well. and Kana Signs, Think Now How Much You Really Want (to learn them). and also A Kind Samurai Told ...


3

It means "end up". それがどれだけ無意味なもんかすぐに思い知る羽目になるだろさ‌ You'll soon end up realizing how meaningless they (=things you've learned) are. Here "realizing how meaningless they are" is something unpleasant to the listener.


3

「あの店は今、3割引のセールをしています。」"I suspect it means 30% , but maybe it means 33.3% which is 1/3?" "In any case I don’t understand the logic behind this." According to コトバンク, etymologically speaking,「割{わり}」comes from「把利・和利」 which was used for the unit of tax.「把」 was defined as 1/10 of a bundle of rice harvest and some「把」was paid to the mayor. I am not sure where 「和利」 ...


2

あの店は今、3割引のセールをしています。 I suspect it means 30% , but maybe it means 33.3% which is 1/3? Your suspicion is correct. わり and わりびき should be in the dictionary. In any case I don’t understand the logic behind this. One wari = ten percent. How would you say if the discount rate was 3% instead? さんパーセントオフ


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