New answers tagged

3

辞書形+場合 means "In the case someone will do the action". た形+場合 means "In the case someone has done the action". I think "カードをなくす場合は、すぐカード会社に連絡してください。" is unnatural because no one will lose the card deliberately (will have no intention of losing the card). However, if you often lose the card, you can say like this "カードを(よく)なくす場合は、カードを財布の中に入れておきましょう。". For ...


5

「漢字{かんじ}は一緒{いっしょ}でも読{よ}み方{かた}とかが全然{ぜんぜん}違{ちが}ってくるの本当{ほんとう}、凄{すご}いですよね。」 「とか」 functions to give a single (or primary) example of what is being talked about. Here that example is the 「読み方」 ("readings" or "pronunciations" of the same kanji). 「読み方とか」, therefore, means "things such as readings/pronunciations". Roughly speaking, 「とか」 is the colloquial and ...


-1

Considering just the bare sentence and your given translation, I would think of something like: あなたでは間に合わないかもしれない。 You might not get there in time "by yourself".


6

「のりまきみたいに くるまれば ふかふか ふとんに なるんだもん」 Since more context was definitely needed to discuss this sentence, I searched and found out here that this is about a girl with extremely long black hair. That piece of information is of much importance and the preceding sentence is: 「そとにだって ねられるの。」 Using kanji, we have: 「外にだって寝られるの。のり巻きみたいに包まればふかふかふとんにになるんだもん。」 ...


2

So, as Micah has said, this と is indeed the quoting particle. That said, Japanese is a lot more flexible with the grammatical concept of quotation and how it fits into sentences than English is. Quotes can attach to things that you wouldn't expect them to in English - like in this case, the noun 評判. If you look here (and ignore all the examples involving ...


0

According to https://jisho.org/word/と: と can be a particle used for quoting (with speech, thoughts, etc.) Concerning 『 』, according to https://www.japanesewithanime.com/2017/05/quotation-marks-japanese.html: There is no difference between how 「」 and 『』 affect a phrase. They are both just quotation marks and don't impact the grammar, add nuance, or ...


4

You would need to use a relative clause to modify the "thing(s)" ("こと"). In case you did not know, the noun 「こと」 is placed after the relative clause in Japanese, which is the exact opposite of English. English: "the things that I choose to do" Japanese: 「自分{じぶん}がすると決{き}めたこと」 This big difference in word order must be the reason that we receive so many ...


2

There is a clear difference in meaning. 「思いました」 means "(I) thought". You thought (or felt) something momentarily in the past (including the immediate past "just now"). 「思っていました」 means "(I) have/had been thinking/feeling". The thinking lasted for some time. That time period could be quite short or it could be very long such as multiple years or ...


0

In verb conjugations, beginning students are typically taught only a single usage for a verb conjugation. Base-II (or ます form) conjugation, or the い conjugation, is commonly taught as the form that is used for the ます form of verbs. While this is true, the ます form is not the only usage that it has. One of the more common usages for base-II conjugation is ...


4

This employment of present tense is called historical present (or 史的現在 in Japanese). I think Japanese novels tend to use it more often than English ones. In Japanese novels, past tense and present tense are often mixed even within one paragraph. It's hard to generalize, but I have heard that past tense is typically used to "move the story forward" while ...


5

「Phrase A + よう + Phrase B」 「Phrase A + ように + Phrase B」 In basic meaning, the two patterns above are identical. The only difference is that the second one using 「ように」 is more casual and conversational than the first with 「よう」. For that reason, 「よう」 tends to be used more often in writing. The sentence you have quoted sounds non-conversational; ...


7

Both of the two なければ's are conditional in form, but in actual effect neither really expresses any condition. In constructions of such a form as「AもBれば、CもD」, 「れば」 can work more like a coordinating conjunction, like the examples below. 「彼女は顔も良ければ、頭も良い。」 "She is good-looking, and smart too." 「数学ができる人もいれば、そうでない人もいる。」 "Some people are good at math, (and) ...


6

「解放感{かいほうかん}もなければ、次{つぎ}の職{しょく}を探{さが}さなければという焦{あせ}りもなかった。何{なに}を思{おも}えばよいのかが、よくわからなかった。」 makes perfect sense. Perhaps you have confused yourself by mistakenly thinking that the 「解放感もなければ」 corresponded with「次の職を探さなければ」. It actually corresponds with 「焦りもなかった」 in the double-も construct discussed in this Q&A. Thus, this person had/felt neither A nor B. ...


4

Here's the breakdown: ほっぽる: a colloquial godan verb that in this context means "to leave (alone)" ほっぽって: the te-form of ほっぽる ほっぽっておく: the te-form followed by the subsidiary verb おく, which means "to do something for the time being" here. See this question or this article. ほっぽっとく: the contracted form of ほっぽっておく. See this answer. ほっぽっといても: the temo-form of ...


4

Given the limited context, there's only so much room for interpretation, but assuming that this is only a fragment of the conversation, this can be an acceptable answer. そうですね is a way to say, that is so or right, but there are also cases where it is used as the speaker is gathering their thoughts about the matter. While not expressly stated in most ...


3

「重要な事は、それを信じる人間にとってそれが本当たりえる事だ。」 I am finding two issues with the phrase 「本当たりえる」. 1) the poor, casual word choice of 「本当」 and 2) the substandard reading of 「たりえる」 It would be a considerably more normal and acceptable phrase if: 1) 「本当」 were replaced by a less informal 「真実」 and 2) 「たりえる」 by 「たりうる」 Using kanji, it is 「足り得る」 meaning "to be equal to", "...


4

どちらも「引用{いんよう}の『と』」 ("quotative と") になります。 実際{じっさい}の歌詞{かし}を見てみましょう。 1)聞{き}こえてる でも無駄{むだ}よ 目を覚{さ}ませ 起{お}きろと どこかで呼{よ}ぶ 謎{なぞ}めいた声{こえ} この部分{ぶぶん}は、一般的{いっぱんてき}な散文{さんぶん}では次{つぎ}のようになります。 聞こえてる、でも無駄よ。 「目を覚ませ!」、「起きろ!」と 謎めいた声がどこかで呼んでいる。 「~~と呼んでいる」という文型{ぶんけい}です。主語{しゅご}は「謎めいた声」です。 要{よう}するに、どこかで誰かが「目を覚ませ!」、「起きろ!」と言っているという意味{いみ}になります。まさに引用そのものです。...


4

注意するだった is ungrammatical. I think you could think of it this way: 注意する -- is careful / pay attention 注意した -- was careful / paid attention 注意す(る)べきだ -- should be careful / should pay attention 注意す(る)べきだった -- should have been careful / should have paid attention The full sentence would be: 彼女の説明は具体的だ。 To say "Her explanation should be concrete"...


3

Seems it would help you greatly if you could get your mind off the definition "greeting" for a moment because it will not apply here. 「迎{むか}えに(やって)くる」 can only mean one thing, which is "to come pick one up (to take one somewhere)". Only when it is in the form 「[Person] +を + 迎える」, 「迎える」 can mean "to greet/meet/welcome [Person]". 「迎えにいく」 and 「迎えにくる」 should ...


-1

I'd say 連絡させていただきます is "more humble" than 連絡いたします. That said both are acceptable in similar situations.


2

Both sentences are ungrammatical. The correct forms are: 日本語の本が読めるようになりたい。 日本語の本を読むことができるようになりたい。 You cannot directly combine the the potential-form and the tai-form. You cannot combine the dictionary-form and になる, either. The workaround for both cases is ようになる. The usage is explained in many other pages including this. Also note that 本が読むことができる ...


7

「美{うつく}しい伝統{でんとう}の国柄{くにがら}を明日{あす}の日本{にっぽん}へ」 That is not a sentence. It is a perfectly-formed phrase for a title, headline or motto, but without a verb at the end, I would not call it a sentence. So, what is the verb that is left unsaid? It would be the one that logically fits below (in English): "to (verb) our beautiful national characteristics into/...


1

While ひどい can mean "cruel" when describing a person or behavior, it can also be used similar to the English "terrible" to describe bad or undesirable (but not necessarily cruel) situations or outcomes. A common translation for あんまりひどい is "It was(is) [just] too much" though it doesn't quite work here.


2

たまには自分を解放してあげないとね You are correct that ない makes this negative, but the translation you have seen is still a reasonable one. The key to understanding how, is the と that comes afterwards. This と is a conditional, but the rest of the sentence is unspoken. You have to fill in the implication for yourself. "If you don't let yourself relax once in a while ...". ...


3

I think both 時代だったもんだから ("because it was a time") and 時代があったもんだから ("because there was a time") perfectly make sense in this context, and neither is better than the other. The former is simply explaining the said 時代. The latter sounds like the speaker is trying to "re-introduce" the word 時代, which might be making the story slightly more dramatic, but the ...


6

あれで is equivalent to あの様でいて, whose literal translation is "(That thing) exists in that way (and/but)". Thus it can be used as あの様でいて、さらに金髪だったらもっと彼に似ているのになぁ which can be shortened to: あれで金髪だったらもっと似ているのになぁ and then further to: あれで金髪だったらなぁ What exactly is shortened needs to be guessed, so I can't be 100% sure what is implied, but one ...


7

I think it would be called a 分岐点{ぶんきてん}. In addition to physical path splits, it's often used to indicate turning points abstractly (like a turning point in your life etc). EDIT: As @Flaw mentions, this word may not be the best to describe the situation in casual spoken language. A more casual way you could express this is 分かれ{わかれ}道{みち}. However, even ...


1

仕送りするて言うて is equivalent not to 仕送りして言って, but to 仕送りするって言って. In standard Japanese, the sentence would be 兄ちゃんたちだって仕送りするって言ってくれてるんだ, 'Your brothers are saying they'll send you an allowance, too'. 出とらんで is 出て + おる + negative ん + て. If you understand that negative ん comes from historical ぬ, then I think you would agree that んで is a fairly natural て form. 出ておる ...


5

子供{こども}は母親{ははおや}が持{も}ち帰{かえ}ったものを何{なん}でも食{た}べます。 子供は母親が持ち帰るものを何でも食べます。 In both sentences, the main verb is 「食べます」 and the tense of the main verb is the tense of the sentence. That means whether you use 「母親が持ち帰る」 or 「母親が持ち帰った」 as a relative clause to modify the 「もの」, it has no effect at all on the tense of the sentence itself, which is present. In ...


5

な is the attributive form of the copula だ (plain form of です). It is what だ becomes when that part of the sentence moves from the predicative position to form a relative clause (sometimes called an adjective clause because it functions like an adjective): 部屋がきれいだ - The room is clean きれいな部屋 - A clean room There is no requirement for だ→な for ...


8

「猫{ねこ}の写真{しゃしん}を見{み}ないですむと思{おも}うと、同情{どうじょう}しろという方が無理{むり}だった。」 First, the 「方」 is read 「ほう」. Reading it 「かた」 would not be a possibility here as 「[Person] が無理だった」 is an unnatural-sounding phrase to begin with. 「[Verb Phrase in Imperative Form] + という方{ほう}が + [Phrase with Negative Content]」 This pattern should be remembered almost as a set phrase as it ...


5

「~~だろうが」 is an accusatory sentence-ender used primarily by male speakers. The 「が」 is a particle. 「がい」, though not too common, is an emphatic and tougher-sounding version of that 「が」. Likewise, for emphasis, 「か」 for questioning becomes 「かい」 and 「だ」 for affirmation or declaration becomes 「だい」. Though 「かい」 and 「だい」 are far more common than 「がい」, I do not ...


6

I think you're right. ~てしょうがない/~てしかたない (without も) can mean "(I) can't help but...", and ~てもしょうがない/~てもしかたない, "(You) shouldn't..." And you're also right that ~~たって (<た+とて) is a colloquial way of saying ~~ても, "even if". So these phrases are literally like... [感情・感覚を表す表現(phrase expressing feeling or emotion)] + て(で) + しかた(が)ない/しょうがない/しようがない (or たまらない/...


2

The ん in 予約してくれんか is a contracted form of ない. Thus, the sentence is the same as 私に予約してくれないか. The polite version of this sentence is 私に予約してくれませんか, so I think the answer is c). (I hesitate to call the polite form 普通の言い方, though...) The other options contain explanatory-の, but it is not included in the original sentence. 予約してくれないのですか means "(Does that mean) ...


3

The meaning here is probably まるで触れ得ないものの様な, which means "As if it is an untouchable thing". My honest guess is that the author squeezed in 為らざる in order to make the sentence sound more archaic and impressive (rather than having some different meaning in mind). 為る here is equivalent to である、so adding 為らざる is equivalent to writing まるで触れ得ないであるものの様な、which is ...


4

明鏡国語辞典 第二版 has a dedicated entry for this たろう: たろ‐・う ① 過去の事柄や完了した事柄についての推量を表す。~ただろう。「寒かっ━ね」「知っていれば来なかっ━」 ②《多く上昇調のイントネーションを伴って》過去の事柄や完了した事柄について相手が同意することを期待しながら確認する意を表す。~ただろう。「君に見せ━?」「おもしろかっ━?」「僕が入院したことがあっ━、高校生のころ」 過去の助動詞「た」の未然形+推量の助動詞「う」。 活用語の連用形に付く。ガ・ナ・バ・マ行の五段動詞に付くときは濁音化して「だろう」となる。「君はもうこの小説を読んだろう」 Etymologically, it's analyzed as たろ + ...


4

少なくとも最後の最後、ばあさんはいいやつに会ったんだ。それで、きもちのいい運転でドライブを楽しんだ。車に乗ってるあいだは、楽しかったろう。 「ろ/ろう」 is an informal/colloquial sentence-ender expressing conjecture. It is used mostly by male speakers (and it does in fact sound quite masculine). The phrase 「ばあさんはいいやつに会ったんだ」 is already quite colloquial and masculine, so 「ろ/ろう」 fits right in. 「ろ/ろう」 can be replaced by 「だろう」 or 「...


2

l'électeur posted a superb answer already, but I would like to add on this part. まま is one of those things that fills me with dread whenever I see it in a sentence. [...] Does anyone have a good way to understand まま in general? So far, the model that helped me the most to understandn まま, as a learner, is the one that follow. Note that this model is ...


6

「ダドリーの誕生日{たんじょうび}———なんで忘{わす}れられようか。」 The grammar pattern used here is: 「なぜ/なんで/どうして + Verb in Potential-Imperfective Form + か」 This is a 反語表現{はんごひょうげん} ("rhetorical question"); therefore, 「なんで忘れられようか」 actually means: "One would never forget." or in Japanese, 「決{けっ}して忘れないだろう。」 rather than the literal translation: "How would he be able to forget?" ...


8

「仰向{あおむ}けになったままで、ハリーは今{いま}まで見{み}ていた夢{ゆめ}を思{おも}い出{だ}そうとしていた。」 First of all, the 「仰向けになった」 part suggests that Harry had already been lying for some time in some kind of non-face-up body position, correct? Then, he turned around on his back. 「~になる」 would describe that position change. 「仰向けになったままで + Mini-Sentence」 means "He did something while he was lying ...


3

It's a little puzzling, but I would read it as "単行本の描き下ろし" AND "描き下ろし(70ページくらい)1冊". The former refers to some new content related to his existing 単行本 (e.g., a small sequel), and the latter refers to a completely new dojinshi with 70 pages.


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