New answers tagged

0

ある日を境に俺とヴィンスの間に混ざるようになったエミーは、木の枝を見つけてきては、勝ち気な青い目を長い金髪の間に覗かせながら、俺たちの間に入ってきた。 It is read as 「あいだ」. In the first (俺とヴィンスの間に) and third (俺たちの間に) usages of this sentence, it means "among" or "within". It could mean "between" as far as a spatial distance, but without context from previous sentences, I'd say it's unlikely. In the second usage (長い金髪の間に), it ...


0

so in : 空港に何時に行きますか and 何時に空港に行きますか their difference is "くうこうに " which at the first sentence, it came at the beginning but at the second one it came after なんじに they don't have much difference...the only thing that differs is the position of に ! I think the に thing confused you, there are two に in the sentence, the first one is for 時, you some ...


4

I don't quite understand what the speaker is saying overall, but the structure is clear. [風]か[水やがらんとした空]か So it's 空 followed by か. 見えやしないか is a colloquial pronunciation of 見えはしないか (What is this や in 大きすぎや?), so the や has nothing to do with the enumerating particle. 見えはしないか is basically the same as 見えないか "Doesn't one see...?" except that the whole phrase ...


4

Yes, this is a fixed pattern that requires two も's. It's hard to explain "why", but Japanese も can be used twice to list two similar things (e.g., 国語も英語も得意です, 泣いても笑ってもこれで最後だ). Meaning of 「X 一緒なら Y 一緒」 What nuances do the も…ば…も structure carry? What is the grammar behind もなければ、なければ? JGram: も~ば~も What nuance would be different if は were to be used? Simply,...


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The programming group that wrote the censoring algorithm probably don't have native English speakers on board, either that or their voices are simply blatantly ignored. have => h__v : "av" is abbreviation for adult video nice => n___ : "ice" is another name for crystal meth. future => __t__e : "fu" = f__k you, not so sure about "ur" though. From ...


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If you are applying the same verb to both actions, as in your question, then you can just join the objects together with か, e.g. AかBを買えます。 You can buy A or B. If you want to use different verbs e.g. "You can buy a cat or deposit your money in the bank" then I'm not sure I know how to do this. I have asked a separate question.


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If your language has a way to form impersonal sentences, that is it. Japanese grammar does not require marking of subject, thus you can make a sentence that describes a specific event without subject. In the case, what should stand as subject in other languages is undefined until further disambiguated by particles, honorifics, context, or explicit addition. ...


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何もナシ means "(there is) nothing at all". 何も is a negative polarity item, which is always followed by a negation (ない, ぬ, ず, ...). Please see: The reason for using 何も+negative, but 何でも+positive This なし is a classic version of ない, but it is still used when brevity is important. Please see: What form is あり? なし on its own means "there is not", but 何も strengthens ...


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Is the stuff above correct? Looks good to me. But the real language is often more complicated and interrelated than the textbook, that is, I would call this ちゃう = てしまう an "opportunistic action", or some "I didn't expect it, but now there it is, so why don't" feeling. It'll be somewhere in between your #1 and #2. What does the 的な at the end of ...


2

優しさに乗る means to give in to/go along with someone's kindness. (NB: に乗る) The use of しまう here (乗ってしまう→乗っちゃう) conveys an acknowledgment of deriving benefit from someone. By giving in to your kindness, the speaker is gaining something. The しまおう form conveys an intention to do something. 的な is a slang version of みたいな, which, when used to end a sentence, can ...


2

許す means to forgive (or allow/permit/tolerate). ごめん means "sorry." 許す by itself doesn't mean "forgive me." Maybe you meant 許してください? If so, 許してください = "forgive me" and ごめん = "sorry." (As with all things language-related, there are about a million other things to be said on this topic, but judging from your level maybe this is the clearest explanation for ...


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Ok I made a mistake: I thought that the passive causative form was used with 詰む. But in fact, the verb was 詰まる with the causative and the dictionary gives: 言葉{ことば}に詰{つ}まる (exp,v5r) to be at a loss for words


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食事は良く噛んで食べましょう。 This type of te-form adverbially describes how the second verb (食べる) is done. This question is related. Similar examples include: 歩いて学校に行く to go to school by foot (not "to walk and then go to school") ナイフを使って紙を切る to cut paper using a knife (not "to use a knife and then cut paper") In your case the second verb is less important than the ...


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(I know this is frowned upon, but given the comments I've received from the original poster, I've reworked my answer.) To me, replacing both of these "に" with "で" sounds off. As far as I've heard, "に" is usually taught as indicating the location at which something exists or the direction something moves in / its destination, and that you should use で for ...


2

Japanese is a very context-dependent language, so individual sentences can be hard to decode. Without more context, it looks like it's: "After this it's the house of the kid/girl named {feruto}, right?" 何々で合ってる? is a way of confirming information, roughly equivalent to "... right?"


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This 出る is the third entry under #4 here. ある態度をとる。ある態度で相手に対する。 To take/adopt a (given) attitude/behavior/manner of acting. To face the person you're interacting with with a (given) attitude/behavior/manner of acting. In this case, the behavior that is being adopted is the entire sentence between ここは and に出よう. A 作戦, or strategy, typically comprises a ...


2

This 感覚 is more like a no-adjective (except that it requires some modifier before it, like 様子). 彼はそういう感覚だ on its own means "He feels that way". そういう感覚の人 means "a person who feels that way". And this でいる (te-form of だ + いる) describes continuation ("He keeps/remains feeling so"). The usage of でいる is not different from that in 健康でいる ("to stay healthy"). See: ...


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It doesn't say "past tense" but 過去のこと and it seems to mean "what has already happened", here. It's certainly misleading, though.


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ところ, which literally just means "place", can be used to describe a quality or aspect of something. This is a metaphorical extension of ところ's literal meaning as a location in space/time. どんな人でも良いところもあれば、悪いところもある。 Everyone has both good qualities and bad qualities. 彼には少し臆病なところもある。 He can be a bit of a chicken at times. (lit. He also has a slight ...


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In modern Japanese, 邂逅 is a する-verb (which are also known as サ変), but in classical-esque Japanese the する becomes す (see 愛する vs 愛す etc). The し comes from the 連体形 (form used to connect to nouns such as 瘴炎) of the auxiliary particle き, which is a particle that is well known for having crazy conjugation patterns. き is used similarly to how た is used in modern ...


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Adding の after a verb is a way of forming a noun clause. Adding the ですか then turns it into a question in the polite form. Ending with the の like in your second example is the same but in a casual form. Note that in this case という is being used quite literally, asking "how do you say that." But という is an idiom that can be used in other ways as well.


2

おきに is different from the other two because it always implies intervals. X おきに always implies with an interval of X. You can't use it if there aren't any predictable intervals. The emphasis is on describing what happens at what interval. This is different from たびに、ごとに because they can be used without an "interval": 見るたびに、見るごとに美しくなっていく When used ...


3

This is not a double が because each occurrence actually belongs to a separate clause. The first が indeed tells us that the subject of the main clause is 2000人以上の子ども. However, the second が belongs to the phrase インターネットが原因で "As a result of the Internet", and tells us that the subject of that phrase is インターネット "the Internet". Note that by omitting the phrase ...


4

Basically, ようでは expresses "if (this negative situation is the case), then ...". There is a good explanation of this on p725 of A Dictionary of Advanced Grammar. In case you don't have access to that, their definition is: "a conjunction that presents an undesirable situation, which is assumed to be factual" Examples: 成績が今までのようでは、困ります。 If your ...


1

You say that たびに and ごとに have basically the same meaning but that isn't quite accurate. Think of たびに as 'whenever' in English - describing an event which produces the same outcome every time. In your sample sentences, the 'more' is not exactly a translation of たびに but rather an inference based on the idea of 'every (consecutive) time' something happens. ...


4

~てしまえばいい usually means "It's better to just do ~ (despite the risk)", "should stop worrying and do ~ ", etc. Here are related questions: What are these forms: かけちゃお, つないじゃお? 「言っちゃったほうが、」の意味 逃げてしまえばいい means something nuanced like "(Rather than confronting the difficulty) [I/you] should stop worrying and just run away". 宿題をしてしまえばいい is grammatically correct, ...


3

I think it may make things clearer to look at てばかりいられない as a combination of two separate grammar points: てばかりいる and ていられない. ていられない, as you seem to know, expresses the inability to continuously be in some state, or to continue being in that state. I couldn't find a good site for this in English, but here is a pretty simple explanation in Japanese. A simple ...


1

その結果 is a commonly used expression and you can use in written/spoken language in any situations. It can be replaced with "それで", but it simply means "and" or "then" in English. In this case, I think "おかげで"(thanks to) is concise and suitable for these sentences like below. ・三ヶ月ダイエットを続けたおかげで、5キロやせた。 ・父は人の何倍も努力したおかげで、仕事で成功した。 In negative consequences, "せいで" ...


4

A verb modified with たい behaves just like an i-adjective. So 分かりたくない is just the standard negation: "I don't want to understand". To understand what difference adding も makes, see this link.


1

誰か ... 誰かがやったことにするんだ ... ! I'm guessing this is essentially, "Someone ... someone [else?] will have done this," as in, he's going to pin the crime on another person. Yes, that's right. Literally it translates as "I will (んだ) make this into something (ことにする) that someone else (だれかが) did (やった)". I'd like to make sure that I'm understanding 「やったこと」 ...


1

Is it a special pattern or is it explicable with the "usual" meaning of だけ? It's meaning (2) in this definition. In this case, dake corresponds to an upper limit or the maximum possible. In English "only" usually implies a limitation or a lack but in Japanese "dake" can also imply exactitude, something like "precisely", or up to some limit or another. ...


3

「雨の中をでかける」 「私は雨の中を10分も待たされた。」 「気がつくと僕は雨の中を公園に立っていた。」 In these examples, を is used in another sense: を〘格助詞〙 ❸ 動作・作用が行われる周りの状況を表す。 「雨の中を横断歩道を駆け抜ける」 「吹雪の中を捜索を続行する」* (from 『明鏡国語辞典』) The を indicates the surrounding situation/circumstance in which an action or event takes place. * The second を in the first example 雨の中を横断歩道を駆け抜ける indicates "...


2

I guess what you are confusing is interpreting this「を」as "only limited to real/certain/substantial" 'point of departure'. The「を」can be "your mental picture/your memory/your image" of 'point of departure'. So, the sentence:「彼は雨の中を出ていった。」 simply tells the fact : "When it's raining(outside), he left.". It can be "snapshot" and does not specifies that he was ...


2

But I'm confused with this part of the sentence: ...読み取られログインが進む。 It's the formal version of continuative 読み取られて, dropping the て and using the 連用形【れんようけい】 instead.


3

These questions are fairly similar, but certainly not identical. I would translate these sentences like this: どんなマンガが好きですか? What kind of manga do you like? Versus, 好きなマンガはなんですか? What manga do you like? The important difference is that when you ask about 好きなマンガ, you are asking for specific manga that the person likes, versus どんなマンガ which ...


2

Considering that you are taking these phrases from a game, I would not expect too much grammatical accuracy. Especially since it seems to be with a "man of the sea" character - they are often portrayed as having extreme accents and speaking habits. But let's have a look at the phrases you mention: おたからかいしゅ is most likely お宝(おたから)回収(かいしゅう) which means "...


3

The structure てある is used to indicate that somebody has of their own volition performed a deliberate preparatory action on an object. Intransitive verbs have no object to perform the action on. Basically, てある describes states of being which have resulted in an object having been acted on to completion, usually with a specific goal in mind for that object. ...


3

(Using the example sentences from the links you provided.) 使わないものはクローゼットにしまってあります。 tsukawanai mono wa kurōzetto ni shimatte arimasu. I leave things that I do not use in my closet. Here しまって is the te-form of the transitive verb しまう "to put away / to store". 窓が[閉まって]{しまって}います。 mado ga shimatte imasu. The window was/is closed. Here しまって ...


2

Can たい be used to express desire for a 2nd person to do something. No. The 〜たい form to express a desire or wish can only be used to express your own feelings and applies only to the 1st person ("I"). In particular, if you say 戻りたい it will always be interpreted as you yourself wanting to return / go back. If you want to talk about someone else (2nd ...


1

Here is how I interpret the sentence: "Brought up in a household of knights, they have both lost their parents and siblings in battle and ended up without any relatives." Yes, your translation is right. The author probably wanted to end with '天涯孤独の身', which is called 体言止め for emphasising the last noun by stopping the sentence with it, and made the mistake. ...


4

If you want to express desire for a 2nd person to do something, you can use these phrase, Aに~してほしい or Aに~してもらいたい. So you can say あなたに戻ってきてもらいたい or あなたに戻ってきてほしい.


2

ちゃんとした手術をするのかと思ったら、獣医さんはその場で切開を始めた かと思ったら here is not a question, the か is being used as speculation, so it means something like "I thought he would..." or "I imagined he would..." I think that means the veterinary is going to do a proper surgery and he begins an incision, but I'm not sure about that construction's meaning. That そのば means "right there ...


1

Note, the OP amended their question after this answer. This is a bit of an strange question. Perhaps I'm misunderstanding you but the fact that you are talking about weather has nothing to do with the choice of particles. The same rules apply to weather as they do to anything else. Let's take your example sentence: 雨が降っている。 This would be what you ...


0

It's possible but people will probably still expect something in between the 歳 and the 大 even if just a space or a comma: http://naritamasatsugu.com/2019/01/13/map-9/ この時僕は20歳 大学生。 https://www.hayato0606.com/business/sitadumi/ 僕は20歳、大学生の時に起業したんですが、 https://oshiete.goo.ne.jp/qa/1330006.html 僕は20歳大学生の男です。 . I feel that 20歳 is used as an ...


-1

でも、お腹がすいたし、おいしかったので、たくさん食べました。 But I was hungry and it was tasty so I ate a lot. What is happening with this mix of し and ので? Nothing is happening. It seems the ので clause has some sense of "and because it ended up being tasty", while the し clause seems to relate to her reasoning before she started eating. し is just listing the reasons why she ate a ...


-1

As someone already mentioned ちらっと is just one word. As for your second question, this is from 明鏡国語辞典: (I believe this def. best fits here) ある事柄の生起や認識のきっかけを表す。「トンネルを抜けると海だ」「家に帰ると食事の支度ができていた」「そんなことを言われると照れるな」 ちらっと見ると、彼女も寒さで震えている As I look at her, I realize/see that she is shivering as well.


-1

ちらっと見ると The と in ちらっと is just part of the adverb. The closest possible translation of this into English would be "with". Edit: ちらっと , is the と here part of an entire word? or is it acting as a particle Yes, it's part of the word. See the link above. But in this case, the conditional does not make sense as "when he glanced at the girl? , she was ...


1

I can't figure out the meaning of 美しくいる It's the second meaning of いる here: 居る "to stay".


1

If I have guessed right, you are somewhat confused by the ambiguity of English be. Be itself is a verb that has a meaning when you say "I think, therefore I am". Meanwhile it has another usage as almost meaningless bridge between words in a case like "I am Sam". And English adjectives need the aid of the latter (copula) be to correctly inflect, which ...


2

あなたは私を駅で降ろしてもらえませんか? is unnatural. It is generally 私を駅で降ろしてもらえませんか? and it means "Couldn't I have you drop me off at the station". The subject is "I". It is the same as "私はあなたに車で迎えに来てもらえるかしら?" and "私はあなたに写真を撮ってもらえないでしょうか?". As for いただく、the subject of いただく is "I" and it is commonly omitted. The structure is 私は、"あなたが私と会うことを" いただけますか?


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