We changed our privacy policy. Read more.

New answers tagged

0

今度{こんど} is a combination of 今{いま} and 度{たび}. If you look up what both mean, you'll find that 今{いま} can mean "now", "the present time", "soon", "immediately" and 度{たび} means "times" as in a counter for occurences (e.g. one 1 time = 1x / two times = 2x and so on). Together their meaning is combined and means ...


1

The following is my intuition. I think for most verbs, you can use dictionary or タ or テイル forms interchangeably without changing the meaning, even if there are some nuance difference. In particular, the sentences in the question mean mostly the same with any of those forms, as long as they are acceptable. dictionary -タ -テイル English 〇知る ×知った 〇知っている as far ...


0

I had the same question after reading DoBJG, Wasabi JPN and even this 日本語の森 video. What helped me the most, was this explanation I found here: なくて connects a negative clause ending with ない to a main clause (via the negative て-Form), and it expresses the cause or reason for the action or state expressed in the main clause. This cause / effect relationship is ...


1

In the video, I think Yama-chan says: 「YOUさんに、『婿にしたいランキングぶっちぎりのビリ』と言われた (or 言われて)...」 YOUさんに...言われた means "I was told by YOU-san" (i.e. "YOU-san told me"). 婿にしたい literally means "want to make (someone) one's husband". From the surrounding context in the video, Yama-chan got lost in a supermarket in Hawaii and YOU-san told him 「...


1

Your understanding of ようだ is correct. It does mean something like “parece ser.” ようで and ような are both derived from ようだ. The former is the conjunctive form whereas the latter modifies a noun like a な-adjective. In this case, 恋をしているよう and 躍らされてるよう are connected by で and they both modify 鼓動, which is also modified by 高鳴る. 踊らされてる is the result of the following ...


6

I was wondering why there is a を there. I thought that if the first verb is intransitive, and if the second one is transitive you could put a を? Right. Here 土日 is the object of transitive 過ごす. Please refer to: How can verb て become an adverb? Can the を in ~を通して be replaced with は? From @naruto's answers in the pages above: the first verb before て ...


2

Yes, 難しく and 考える are grouped here. The ku-form is a form used to modify a verb, in other words, it works like an adverb. See this article, too. 速く走る to run fast よく考える to think hard 弱く叩く to hit/tap lightly 格好良く踊る to dance in a cool manner Likewise, 難しく考える means "to think in a difficult/complicated way".


1

Nouns never conjugate. There is no such thing as "the te-form of a noun" in the first place. That で is a case particle because it directly follows a noun. Semantically, で like this broadly marks a condition/situation/scope, and it corresponds to various English prepositions such as in, with, by or among. noun + で + いい is a common construction used ...


3

I learned at school that we can infer the verb type from its ない form: the sound right before ない has an あ(a) vowel ⇒ 五段(godan) verb the sound right before ない has an い(i) vowel ⇒ 上一段(kami-ichidan) verb the sound right before ない has an え(e) vowel ⇒ 下一段(shimo-ichidan) verb For example, you can infer that... 聞く is 五段 verb from its ない form きかない (kika-nai) 見る is ...


1

They are not interchangeable in this circumstance. In general, boarding a vehicle takes the particle に with 乗る. Getting off a vehicle often takes the particle を to mark the object of the action of getting off. As a memory trick (if it helps), think of getting on something as movement upwards (stepping up onto a train, getting up on a bike, climbing on a ...


-1

I think I understand now from the comments, I was getting hung up on a complex meaning of nara - that may not exist. The iu just stands for “say”, so “if you say you will return to .., then, …” Silly, I know


2

書く方が難しい or 書くことの方が難しい is the way to go. 書くの方が難しい is 100% ungrammatical. As I said in the linked question, 書くのの方が難しい is not 100% incorrect but it sounds fairly awkward at least to my ears. I suppose that heritage Japanese speaker felt the same way I did, but made a simple mistake while correcting it.


0

No, your sentence is not grammatical. What is that な before ちゃう supposed to be? ちゃう must follow the 連用形 of a verb, and な is not even a verb. If you want to use the ~ないといけない construction, you can use ちゃう after the main verb before ない. 帰っちゃわないといけませんでした。 But this sounds wordy, and I feel 帰らないといけませんでした should be enough. If you are speaking politely, you can ...


4

The core verb here is 過ごす【すごす】, which means "to pass or spend [a period of time]; to pass over something". This is the transitive form of 過ぎる【すぎる】, which means "to pass by; to surpass; to be excessive". As a transitive verb, 過ごす【すごす】 can take a direct object. In your sample sentence, this is 土日【どにち】 ("Saturday and Sunday"): ...


3

In most cases you can use them interchangeably. My feeling is that 日本人女性 sounds more like an individual while 日本の女性 more collective. (Somewhat similar to a Japanese woman vs. Japanese women, but maybe not always.) For example, 私は日本の女性が好きだ means I like Japanese women in general; 私は日本人女性が好きだ is acceptable, but it would be more natural to use it when you like a ...


1

It looks like らぁ in your examples denotes quickly pronounced/slurred るわ: 人には忘れちゃならねーもんがあらぁ → 人には忘れちゃならねーもんがあるわ おまえを男にしてやらぁ、ジム。→ おまえを男にしてやるわ、ジム。 あと勇気があらぁ → あと勇気があるわ(or possibly あと勇気があるな) ほとんどなんでも塩梅してくれらぁね。→ ほとんどなんでも塩梅してくれるわね。 これでPS2でも録画できらぁ → これでPS2でも録画できるわ Going by the Stevenson’s quotes on Weblio, it seems to be used for “rough men” speech. Originally it ...


0

Generally, this kind of phenomenon seems to be called 格の交替 in Japanese linguistics. 中上級を教える人のための日本語文法ハンドブック says this happens (p185) 出来事を描く立場が変わる場合 出来事の状態的な側面を描く場合 1 is the one that happens by changing active/passive. Your case is (probably) included in 2. If you google a keyword like "ヲ格 ガ格 交替", then you see lots of research articles - so it is ...


2

As the comment says, this is a deformed version of the common idiom 三度目の正直 "third time lucky". It's common to "hide" a part of a well-known long cliché/proverb using なんとやら, etc (see this). By not saying everything, you can convey a you-know-what-I-mean sort of sentiment. This 的な is just -ish or -like, but it is applied to 何度目かの正直 as a ...


3

The た-form would be correct if the sentence ended there. 日本語をずっと前から勉強してきた。結局はやめた。 The compound verb 勉強してくる is used in its て-form to connect these two sentences into one, in one of the most basic functions of the て-form. 日本語をずっと前から勉強してきて、結局はやめた。 The sentence sounds a bit unnatural to me, though. I would probably use an adversative conjunction. ...


4

Grammatically, rather than 如何に ~ か being a construction on its own, the pattern is <疑問詞> ~ か when embedding questions. So か is the usual question marker. 如何に is more or less the same as the English how, and just like how, can be used for questions and exclamations. Embedding questions and exclamations are done by <疑問詞>~か: I realized how ...


2

Regardless of how you interpret 逆に, your second interpretation of 俺の事件が連続殺人とは関係なく is syntactically improbable. This is because 俺の事件 is necessarily the subject of 関係ない in it. For your interpretation to be possible, the subject must be something else, such as the question of whether or not Yu is the serial killer, and 俺の事件 must be put inside a subordinate ...


1

何の~ is "what (kind of) ~". 役に立つ is a set phrase meaning "to be useful/helpful", but this 役 is a noun ("role/function"), so it can be modified by 何の. って after 来たから is short for といって. っていうんだ forms a rhetorical question in this context. See the links in the comment. それに Besides, たとえ こいつが来たからって even if he came, 何の役に立つっていうんだ? what ...


2

I’m not sure I get the context right. Let A = 俺の事件  B = 京子の事件 C = 連続殺人事件. Now 京子ちゃんの事件は連続殺人事件とは別件なのだろうか? means the speaker's suspect B ≠ C and 俺の事件が連続殺人とは関係なく means A ≠ C. These make contrast whence 逆に. It is more or less or here. 関係なく here is used synonymously with 別件(だ), that is to be unrelated. The passage describes the following line of thoughts: The ...


4

い-adjectives For い-adjectives the く-form is used in a number of contexts. As you noted, if you wanted to say It's not dark. you'd say 暗くない If you want to say It'll get dark. you'd say 暗くなる So, in the example sentence you provided もう暗くなったから、帰りましょう。 Because it's already gotten dark, let's head home. な-adjectives And for completeness sake, let's look ...


2

乗る on its own only describes the action of mounting or boarding itself. The "destination" marked by に must be a vehicle (or a boat, a horse, etc), not some geographical location. 東京に乗る or 仕事に乗る does not make sense (although "to ride to Tokyo" is a valid expression in English). 車に乗る does not necessary mean you travel to somewhere; you may ...


2

It is very confusing. I’m guessing from the following part that she grabbed one of the leaves that fell off her wings during the last series of attacks and she was still holding one when it was over. 彼女の持つ剣だけじゃない。俺の周りにある葉も剣になっているからできる攻撃だ。 I don’t know how she spread out her arms when she was still holding one big sword with her both hands, though.


3

I'm a native speaker and was also confused at the 二刀流 part. (I have no prior knowledge about this work.) 秘剣・燕返し (p. 83): Okay, 燕返し usually refers to something like this 両手には刃物のようなもの (snip) 一枚の巨大な葉っぱ (p. 84): So she's holding one huge leaf as a two-handed sword セラは剣を持った両手を広げる (p. 86): Huh? How can she do this while holding a big sword? 二刀流で切り刻む (p. 87): Why ...


0

The word 両手【りょうて】 specifically refers to "both hands" as a single unit. This makes it more likely, in my non-native-speaker understanding, that this is a single sword held in "both hands". Later in the text, we get further confirmation that this is one sword held in "both hands", when we get a description of what Sera is ...


3

For "Please do A or B", I think you can use ~するか~してください, as in: 「更新をスタートするにはシャットダウンするか再起動してください。」(Windows) 「事前に窓口でお求めいただくか、インターネット予約をご利用ください。」(バス会社) 「このままお待ちいただくかしばらく経ってからおかけ直しください。」(電話が混んでるときの音声メッセージ) Likewise, for "You can do A or B", I think you can use 「~するか~することができます」, as in: "In my work break I can either eat my sandwiches ...


1

This is not the volitional form, as @lélecteur pointed out. The meaning of the sentence is not about intention to stop. (It may help you to know, or remember, that the そう suffix means something seems or appears like something. Some explanations on its use: here, here.) そうになる is a formula meaning something almost happened. 足が止まりそうになった means that it seemed his ...


0

It's a direct quote. Like when folks say things like わすらないように or かぜをひかないように. That's the complete utterance. So, what the father said to the mother was just the words 渡すように, "[please] hand it over". (Without more context it's a bit hard to say more than that.) This is just an abbreviated form of 渡すようにしてください So for example わすれないように, "[...


4

Yes, here「時に」means sometimes, like 時々、たまに. Per Google's definition: 《副詞的に》 時々。また、たまに。何かのはずみに。どうかすると。 凍えそう: the verb stem of 凍える{こごえる} (to freeze) + clitic suffix そう looks like (it's) about to freeze になるほど is explained in detail here in this answer. It expresses a degree to which something else is described as (by a modifier). でも時に凍えそうになるほど人の世は厳しい can be ...


5

What 時に means? sometimes? Right! 時に means "sometimes". 時に sounds more literary than [時々]{ときどき}. Does 凍えそうになるほど人の世は厳しい mean "friends can be strict to the extent that makes you to tremble"? [人]{ひと}の[世]{よ}, literary "world of human", is almost synonymous to [世間]{せけん} or [世]{よ}の[中]{なか}, "the world", "society". ...


2

ひ in the sentence is 歴史的仮名遣 (Historical kana orthography). Japanese 語頭以外の「わ・い・う・え・お」の多くが「は・ひ・ふ・へ・ほ」であり、「ゐ・ゑ・を」であるものもある。  例:かは(川) こひ(鯉) あふ(会う) まへ(前) かほ(顔) あゐ(藍) こゑ(声) あを(青) English The series of kana ha hi fu he ho are used to represent, in some words, the sounds wa, i, u, e, o, respectively. Japanese So しまひたい is しまいたい in modern writing = しまう (finish/...


2

I guess it is difficult to give a clear answer to a register question like this, but つつ can be used in speech; It is more likely to be used by grownups. At least I don't expect a small kid to use つつ. Another factor might be a rhythm of the whole sentence or collocations, which I'm not really able to explain. Two verbs that may be frequently heard with つつ ...


3

行かせられる works for you, while 行かされる doesn’t. 行かせる and 行かす are both valid causative forms of 行く. The former works as a ru-verb (or ichidan or Group II verb), and therefore, its potential and passive forms are both 行かせられる. As with any other ru-verb, ambiguity could arise. Depending on the context, it could mean either “can make someone go” or “be forced to go.” ...


0

Doing some research, I've gathered the following: When the predicate in an adverbial clause is stative in nature, its form does not change, regardless of the form in the main clause. 寒い{さむ}時{とき}、コートを着{き}ます。 "I wear a coat when it's cold." 寒い{さむ}時{とき}、コートを着{き}ました。 "I wore a coat when it was cold." Japanese Stage-Step Course: Grammar ...


3

The following is my intuition. The pattern is Aとき, B, where A is an adjective. (1) If you mean Whenever A, B, then both A and B are in dictionary form. 暑い時はビールがおいしい Whenever it is hot, beer tastes good. In this case 暑かったとき is not possible. (2) If you mean an event in the past as When A, B happened, then B is in ta-form and A can be either in ta-form or in ...


4

Your interpretations are correct. A dictionary definition says 上の内容を受けて、いかにもそれらしく、の意を表す。「喜劇俳優宜しくおどけてみせる」 Some comments: I agree that this よろしく is used like a particle, but it is an adverb all the same. Your interpretation even though it is not X is not off, but it is more simply exactly like X or as if it were X (which I think already contains the meaning ...


1

AFAIK, there is no real difference between adjectives and verbs in terms of when to use their past-tense or non-past forms with 時. Both forms are valid and useful, but they do not mean the same thing. I think the trick here is to understand that there's nothing really special (grammatically) about the 時 constructs: 時 is just a noun, which means "(a/...


4

Wouldn't this make sense if it were 習得したり磨いたりすることより~ ? Yes. Actually it is usually taught that repeating たり is more proper., although the second たり is frequently omitted. There is no difference in meaning depending on its presence. shouldn't it be 習得したり磨いたりことより~ No, this is ungrammatical. It is rather the opposite: If it is the last element of a sentence,...


3

-ていく and -てくる are subsidiary verbs that can attach to almost any verb. They can safely attach to 歩く, too. Difference between -ていく and -てくる -ていく/-てくる are very common and important in Japanese. Practically speaking, 歩きます without -ていく/-てくる may sound unnatural in many cases, unless you want to emphasize the method of going/coming. When you feel like using -てくる,...


5

Before we begin, this may be technical, but "verdict" and 「判決」shouldn't be equated, because "verdict" and "judgment" are not interchangeable and shouldn't be confused, especially in Japanese contexts. A verdict is the finding or decision made by a jury. Japan doesn't have a jury system 「陪審制」, and thus "verdict" doesn't ...


6

彼女は殺人の有罪判決が確定した seems fine. I think Duolingo is just being annoying there. As for the additional で, it's not the verb that warrants it, but the noun. 有罪 doesn't itself refer to a verdict but a person's state of being guilty. If you want to specify what crime the person is guilty of, you should use で. 彼女は殺人(罪)で有罪が確定した。 You shouldn't omit this で in a noun ...


2

I know nothing about the manga, but the first impression I got from your explanation is that it refers to their chances of survival. She could be casually mentioning the probability of people who don’t run away surviving an encounter with her as she coldly calculates. Then, the “defining word” might be omitted on purpose to make her sound like someone who ...


2

If I remember correctly, in GG2, almost every people she met have fled from her sight(Well, since she literally threatened every mankind at very early in the story, so...). Still, those with courage and/or strength didn't run from her, they fought. The number of people who actually fought is unknown since it's not stated in the story, but of course it's not ...


3

確率 may not be explicitly modified by a relative clause when a listener can infer what type of 確率 is being talked about. Here, you can think of it as an abbreviated version of 私が出会う確率の低い方の人たちだ. 確率が低い basically just means "rare", so you can read it simply as "rare people", too. (Judging from the entire chapter, she seems to speak somewhat ...


5

If I'm forced to guess, the following would be what is emphasized and its possible questions that prompted the sentence. 俺はご飯を食う - neutral statement ご飯を俺は食う ← 何を食べますか What do you eat? ご飯を食う俺は ← 何をしますか What do you do? But, in my opinion, word order is not usually used for emphasizing. For 2 and 3, more natural responses would be (especially if the speaker ...


Top 50 recent answers are included