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1

も is a very common particle. Some describe it as "inclusive", and it's often translated as "even / also / too". In this particular context, the も implies that "even this suburb[an area]..." The underlying value judgment is that the subway is just so darn convenient, that it makes things so much better even in this area outside of the downtown. Side note: ...


4

「若殿{わかどの}の遊{あそ}び相手{あいて}をしてほしいものじゃ。」 Is the construction in bold suitable only for the folk tale style? No. Only the sentence-ender 「じゃ」 has anything to do with stories. The rest of the part in bold is just very normal. As discussed in this Q&A, 「じゃ」 is a common sentence-ending used by older characters in stories. It is role language that means ...


2

Both translations are correct, although in yours you wouldn't say "do a barbecue" in English. The "party" part is implied by "having a barbecue"; it doesn't need to be explicit. 「みんなで」 (notice the で) means "with everyone" or "altogether". The root verb is 持っていく ("take"), not もってくる ("bring"). Note that in Japanese, there is a fairly strict distinction ...


7

I think なり is more nuanced. I found there is an article about this, but I was not very satisfied with his investigation, so the following is basically my own observation. なり indicates the first verb is either a trigger or a precondition of the second verb. The subject is waiting for, or at least anticipating, the realization of the first event. The first ...


0

This ばかり means "nothing but", and the meaning is applied to the quote marked with と. Something like 思っていました is omitted at the point of the ellipsis. (てっきり)~と(ばかり)思っていました is a common pattern that means "I believed ~(, but I was wrong)" or "I was under the (wrong) impression that ~". See these examples. You have overlooked many grammar points of this sentence....


3

This ひら doesn't mean 平(flat, plain) but ひらり. Dictionaries say ひらり means 1: すばやく身をかわしたり飛び移ったりするさま。「ひらりと馬に飛び乗る」 2: 物が軽くひるがえるさま。「木の葉がひらりと舞い落ちる」 ひらっと is almost the same as ひらりと, which means "lightly", "nimbly".


3

「ひらっと」 is not a very common onomatopoeic adverb to use in the context of passing by someone. It would, however, mean "casually", "quickly", etc. More commonly, you would encounter 「さっと」、「さーっと」、「すっと」、「すーっと」、「ふらっと」, etc. Not sure what dictionary you use, but 「ひらっと」 just could not mean "flat or "plain" in the context. You would not pass by someone "flat(...


0

Japanese relative clauses never need particles. First off, as others have stated, プレゼント買う心配がありません means "(I) don't have to worry about buying presents" or literally "(I) have no worries about buying presents" If we swap 心配 with 必要, then we get "I don't need to buy presents." or literally "I don't have the need to buy presents”. 「プレゼント買う」is basically ...


3

Both 書ける and 書けます (and so too 書けるか and 書けますか) have the same meaning, in so far as both are a non-past potential form of the same verb, 書く. However, 書ける is the 'plain form' of the potential verb, while 書けます is the 'polite form' (or 'ます form') of the non-past potential verb. The difference between them is that you are conveying a sense of politeness towards ...


1

Without complete predicate, it is hard to generalize the difference between 〜ないでいる and 〜ていない. So, I'd like to use 食べていない and 食べないでいる from your example. And, I have not understood what "instrumental adjunct" states clearly,but I'd like to answer. The author in the link might be explaining the sentence : 食事を食べないでいる implies "I want to be in the state of not ...


6

「プレセット買{か}う心配{しんぱい}がありません。」 First of all, "present(s)" is 「プレゼント」. Next, 「買う心配」 is grammatical because 「心配」 is a noun in this context; It is not a na-adjective here. Since it is a noun, the 「が」 can directly follow the 「心配」. As a noun, 「心配」 can mean "worry/worries", "care", "anxiety", "fear", "uneasiness", etc. So, the sentence means: "I/We/You have ...


3

The 心配 is a noun here. It's a common pattern of modifying nouns. Try searching for "modifying noun". Basically there is a main clause and a sub-clause ending in a plain-form verb. The verb doesn't have to be in present tense.


4

に対して and に向かって are being used in similar ways here to mean "in regards to" and "towards" respectively, to indicate who is being 呼びかけた'd. Separately, 一年生が三年生に対して『雪乃さん』などと呼びかけてしまったのだ。 means "A first year (accidentally) addressed a third year as Yukinoさん (among other things)." and 一年生が…部のエースに向かって『雪乃さん』などと呼びかけてしまったのだ。 means "A first year (...


4

Your translation is correct, and どんな意味が込められているのか考えるもの(=形) is a completely natural Japanese phrase at the same time. Grammatically speaking, I think this is something called a gapless relative clause explained here. Other similar examples include: 英語を学ぶ楽しみ the joy of learning English (not "the joy which is learning English") カエルが水に飛び込む音 the sound of a frog ...


4

Your translation is 100% spot on. However, this usage of 考える is neither colloquial nor poor use of the language. Following your same logic, パッと見て何を模したかわかる形 would imply that the 形 is the thing doing the looking and the understanding, but we know that to not be the case. We know that the thing doing the looking and understanding is a general person, the '...


5

Habitual actions require the 〜ている pattern. This is a habitual action since you specify 毎日.


0

Here's my suggestion to try to make it clearer for you. I don't know how familiar you are with linguistic terminology so this is a little simplified. But I hope it helps. Radicals can be confusing but a simple way to think of them is as a reference method. You can use the term 'component' to generally mean an individual part within a kanji character. And ...


5

In Japanese, as a general rule, the more important a piece of information is, the closer it will go to the end of the sentence. In 「この建物にいいレストランがあります」, the feeling is that the most important bit of information is the fact that there is a good restaurant. Whereas in 「いいレストランがこの建物にあります」, the feeling is that the most important bit of information is its ...


3

「どんなスポーツでもこの三{みっ}つがなければ上手{じょうず}にならないと考{かんが}えられている。」 「でも」 in this context means "any" in the sense of "regardless of". The basic pattern is: 「どの or どんな + Noun + でも」 「どんなスポーツでも」 = "in any sports" 「どんな人でも」 = "anyone", "everyone" 「どんな国でも」 = "in any country" In my head is something like "although it's expected sports to be good, they aren't going to be ...


3

そうか is "Is that so" or "I see". そういや is colloquialism for そういえば ("That reminds me", "Speaking of that"). 昔のユト is a typo for 昔のコト ("things in the past"), ないひとつ is another typo for 何ひとつ ("(not) at all", "(not) a thing"). As for 思い出せねえんだったっけ, it's colloquialism for 思い出せないのだったっけ. This った is something called a modal-ta. 思い出す to recall 思い出せる can recall 思い出せない ...


2

Yes you can omit 2nd appearance of お肉。 Here is one another way to put it. お肉をナイフで切ってフォークで食べます。 In this you can connect 2 sentences by verb's て form. Just like we would say in English "Cut the meat by knife and eat by fork." no need of 2nd occurrence of object as its already implied.


4

Yes, 2つの~(の間)に何か関係はありますか is a perfectly natural sentence. の間 is typically optional, but dropping it may make the sentence ambiguous depending on the context: 2人に何か関係はありますか? Are the two people related to each other? Are the two people related to (the problem / it / him / etc)? Adding の間 makes the sentence refer only to the connection between ...


14

された in your example is the past form of される, which is an honorific form of する. The auxiliary れる/られる can express 受け身 (passive), 尊敬 (honorific), 可能 (potential), and 自発 (spontaneous). For more on these usages: Is this sentence correct? courtesy/honorific use of the passive Need help understanding causative and passive form: 外国人に質問を聞かれたが、答えられなかった。 創造された ...


3

According to Weblio it's used to strengthen 万が一, which is a set phrase meaning "if by any chance; in the unlikely event that".


2

One of the cool things about 「もの」 is that it can refer to a person (者), OR to a thing (物). And depending on how you use it, it can even be used in a sense to refer to both at once, or even to something as both. When I read: 異形のもののことを、あえて忖度しない、というよりも、気に留めようともしない、らしい。 I get the sense that, by going out of their way to use もの instead of 者, the speaker is ...


0

I think your sentence is great. The only real choice left here is the tone you want to adopt. You chose a polite form of speech with lots of glue words, which conveys a certain signal. In contrast, if you chose a bit more blunt form, it can convey a stronger conviction, with more emphasis on "I". Also, since your fluency is already pretty high, I shall ...


5

「日本{にほん}の歴史{れきし},文化{ぶんか}と神話{しんわ}について投稿{とうこう}する.」 This is a nice try and virtually all Japanese-speakers would understand what you are trying to say. If I were asked, however, whether or not that sentence was 100% natural-sounding, I would have to say 'no'. It would be more natural if you used the verb form 「投稿しています」 if you have already been doing it even ...


5

You ask why a conditional is being used here, but I'm not quite sure why it doesn't sound right to you. なら is being used here in the same sense as "if" in English. ~ようなら is sort of a set phrase used in a similar sense to "if it seems like", with ~よう meaning "seem like"/"looks like". We also say ~ようだったら. わかった。 → Cool. / Got it. / Alright. 九時過ぎるよう → ...


4

Yes, this 聞かせられる is causative-potential. But ヤツ is trying to make コイツ (=女) do something, not the other way around. In other words, this に is part of the AにBをV(さ)せる construction rather than the AにV(ら)れる construction. Here's the breakdown: 言う事: what someone says (hereafter translated as "what is told") 言う事を聞く: to do what is told 言う事を聞かせる: to make someone do ...


1

I think your understanding of the sentence is basically correct. For the part of 「大人数で」, it is natural to think they ring the bell in their turn and throw some coins into the offertory box to make a wish for the new year at a shrine on 正月{しょうがつ}. I suppose it is not like trevi fountain where many people throw coins at the same time around the water fountain....


-2

歴​史と文​化と神​話 - there is no enumeration comma.


2

くせに doesn't change the grammatical connection. It is nothing but a のに in the syntactic layer, but adds a sense of disapproval (What's the difference between にしては、 わりに and くせに?) in the pragmatic layer. In other words, the nuance くせに has doesn't go against any particular word in this sentence. If I had to merge it into an English sentence, I'd choose to ...


5

Your understanding of ながら and のに seems correct. ながら can be used as a more formal conjunction to form a contradictory connection like "although" and "despite —ing". Your translation is, however, not correct. It should be: Despite knowing that the classroom had been changed, my friend did not tell me. In fact, the problem is not about the nuances of ...


2

This is (quote Jisho.org) the past polite conjugation of the verb する. 週末に何をしましたか。 What did you do this weekend? (polite) Your intention of using した is correct, however it is the casual (for a lack of better word) conjugation of する. You would end up with a sentence like this: 週末に何をしたか。 However, this is still kind of awkward as when speaking in a ...


3

I think you should count でなし, じゃなし (ではなし), and でもなし special idioms. They are unrelated to し in ~ないし. Grammatically, they are highly unique that they are allowed to connect directly after the dictionary form of a verb, which is an almost lost particle usage (連体形準体法) except for several combinations of に (2, 3, 4) and a few sporadic cases. ○ 誰が待っているわけじゃなし ...


3

Let me just explain how your example sentences feel like. Please refer to the previous questions for the generic explanation about those particles. あなたの目はきれいです implies that one's eyes are pretty, but not rest of the their body No, that's not correct. This is usually a plain neutral sentence that just means "(I know) Your eyes are (...


3

「ボロボロになろうとなんだろうと自分{じぶん}で気{き}づくしかない。」 First, allow me to start from the basic. 「Verb in Volitional Form + と or が + Phrase」 is a very common expression meaning: "Verb + ても関係{かんけい}なく + Phrase" = "Even if [verb], [Phrase]." Thus, 「ボロボロになろうと」 means "Even if one/you/I were torn to shreds". Moving on to 「ボロボロになろうとなんだろうと」... The 「なんだろうと」 part does ...


1

I think you are translation of ボロボロになろうと → "Even if they will hurt themselves a lot" is correct. I can't find any reference though, I think this なんだろうと means "or anything", "or whatever". However, you might not need explicitly use "or anything", or "or whatever" since it's redundant and "Even if" mean なろうとなんだろうと. Even if it rains a lot, I will go to work. ...


-1

From 新完全マスター N1 文法: 〜といったところだ is a grammar point that has a meaning of 程度は最高でも〜で、あまり高くない. It's used to show that the quantity of something isn't very much. 当地は夏もそれのほど暑くありません。最高に暑い日でも26、7どといったところです。 この山歩き会では毎月山歩きを行っていますが、参加者は毎回せいぜい6、7人といったところです。 From a dictionary of advanced Japanese grammar, p633: といったところだ is a phrase that the speaker uses to ...


5

「これでもか」 is an expression used rather heavily in mostly informal speech. I would suggest that you think of it as an embedded question within a longer sentence. The 「か」 is indeed a question marker. This should also explain why the quotative particle 「と」 or 「って」 will always follow. 「これでも」, by itself, means "even (with) this (amount/degree)." So, what is ...


2

It's protagonist's. You can interpret that the protagonist's facial expression made XXX frightened. It it was XXX's, perspective would abruptly change, which is quite unnatural.


3

It's difficult to explain logically, but the form of …して かまわない is practically used when you let other people do something, rather than yourself. When you include yourself, you use …しても いい (recommended) or …するのは かまわない. この映画をみて きにしない means "I watch this film, nevertheless, I don't care", and doesn't work for your intended meaning. Incidentally, …みるのは きにしない ...


0

Im Japanese and just trying translation training by myself now; so, ill do some try. 六義園と言えば、speaking of Roku Gien park, そばに住むようになって三年ほど経ったその頃には、なかに入ってはじめて見ることができる庭園の手入れの行き届いた芝生の明るさよりも、塀際の、伸びるままにまかせている雑木の暗い木立しか、思い浮かべられなくなっていた that is a park where I started live nearby about three years, rebark my mind only through its darkness of trees crossed straighten as ...


3

言葉はいつでも語るでもなくて そこにあるばかりつのるばかり First of all, the grammar in those two lines. When I saw you say "Words aren't always spoken", I knew I had to mention the grammar. 「言葉」 is the subject (action-taker) of all of the three verbs -- 「語らない」、「ある」 and 「つのる」. What words do not do: 「語る」 What words do: 「ある」 and 「つのる」 Thus, the two lines are roughly saying: "...


1

In this case のため means "purpose", so 刑務所のための場所 means "places [than can be used] for the purpose of prisons", so places that can be used as prison; 以上 means "more than", so, 刑務所のための場所以上に犯罪人がいる means "there are more criminals than places that can be used as prisons". のでいつも is made of ので, "because, since"; and いつも, "always", so 刑務所のための場所以上に犯罪人がいるので means "...


7

「これアカンやつやぞ何か言わんとハードルガンガン上がってくやつやぞー!」 To insert punctuations and the omitted particles if that helped you a little, it would look like: 「これはアカンやつやぞ!何か言わんとハードルがガンガン上がってくやつやぞー!」 To translate this Kansai speech into Standard Japanese, it would be: 「これはいけないやつだぞ!何か言わないとハードルがガンガン上がっていくやつだぞー!」 「あかん」 means "no good". The 「と」 in 「何かいわんと」 is a conditional ...


1

私が疲れるのは、暑さというよりはむしろ湿度のせいだ。 I think it's valid sentence. The author feels tired because of humidity regularly rather than being directly annoyed by high moisture of the surrounding air. So,「湿度」fits to the sentence better than「湿気」. 「湿気が多い」could be the reason of your tiredness though, I think it often implies how annoying your surrounding is such as clothes ...


4

As with many things in Japanese (informal language in particular), this is based on context. If you meet someone for the first time in a while, it would make sense to ask them if they are well, rather than asking them if they think you look well. Pronouns are often dropped when it is obvious who is being refereed to. Unlike many other languages there is no ...


5

母から見れば、私が我慢ならない means "In my mother's eyes, I am unbearable." As you know, 我慢(が)ならない means 我慢できない (or 耐えられない). These are interchangeable in most cases. ならない means できない in some fixed phrases, eg 油断ならない, 聞き捨てならない. 我慢ならない, 油断ならない sound a tiny bit more formal/literary than ~できない. You can use it this way: 私(に)は彼の態度が我慢ならない/我慢できない His attitude is ...


1

"By that time wed been in the district for three years, and the name 'Rikugien' brought to mind not the tidy, sunlit lawns seen by visitors, but the dark tangles along the walls" Probably the translator wanted to make it shorter and simple than literal translation like mine. They do not emphasize the scenery after entering inside ,but rather talking about ...


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