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0

A more grammatical alternative without くれる would be いっしょにきますか? which can be used e.g. as an invitation (i.e. you’re not asking for a favor but just making a suggestion). Yet another variation is いっしょにきませんか which negates the verb and makes the suggestion more indirect, so could be used if you don’t want to insist and give them an easier way out. Although now ...


1

VVayfarer’s excellent answer covered many of the less obvious usages but I wanted to talk about the second example: 「よく聞いたら試験は、明日だった。」 In fact, this sentence does use the normal meaning “well” although it might not appear such on first glance. Literally, よく聞いたら could be translated as “when/if (I) asked well” but a more natural translation of the ...


6

It has quite a lot of uses outside of "often" and "well". In the form of 「よく食べる」 ~ "(They) eat a lot", it would translate to "much", "to a considerable degree" etc. This may sometimes be easy to confuse with the "often" and "frequently" definitions. It can also be used (often in the form of「よくぞ」) when someone says/does something that the speaker finds ...


3

The most natural (and also the easiest) way to express this would be: 私は会議に呼ばれませんでした ...using the passive voice. 会議に呼びませんでした is grammatically correct as a matter-of-factly statement, but it would sound fairly indifferent and unnatural. If you want to use the active voice, please remember there is a set of "subsidiary verbs of favor" in Japanese. ...


1

呼びかける is a compound verb of 呼びます and かけます rather than a かけ form of a verb. I also think more context to your question is necessary. Has the meeting already happened or is it in the future? To me, in English, "call me for the meeting" and "invite me to the meeting" have different meanings. "They didn't call me for the meeting" could imply that you would ...


5

は absolutely, definitely does not mean 'am/is/are'. That role is played by です in your example sentences. は marks the topic of the sentence i.e, Thing I want to talk about は what I want to say about it. There is no equivalent concept in English so it causes a lot of confusion for many Japanese learners. It is commonly translated (very clumsily) as 'as ...


4

The て-form of a verb followed by くれる (polite form くれます) indicates that the verb is being done as a favour to the recipient of the verbs action. くれる literally means 'to give', so いっしょにきてくれますか would translate as "Will you give (me the favour of) coming with me, i.e. "Will you come with me". There are other verbs that do similar/related things: あげる, もらう etc....


8

The closest equivalent would be それとも in both cases. "Or do you want me to (do it)?" could be translated as 「それとも私がやりましょうか?」, while "Or did you not see it?" could be expressed like 「それともまだ見て(い)ないんですか?」 etc.


1

I watched the video of the short speech and Shigeru Miyamoto definitely says 作り始めましょう、っていうことになったんですけど... First off, it doesn't matter if there's a period or a comma. Like in English, the meaning stays the same ("I accept it. However..." / "I accept it, however"). Then - like you've already demonstrated with 対談 - ことになった means "it was decided". So what ...


1

日本語として自然な表現をすると、次のような感じになるかと思います。一部、意訳を含みます。 “I just woke up and I work later.” 今起きたところなので、もう少ししたら仕事に出かけます。(If later means few minutes. Sometimes 「もう少し」means more longer time, like one hour later or so, but it depends on 文脈 or situations.) しばらくしたら仕事に出かけます。(same as or a little longer than 「もう少し」) or 今起きた所です。何時間かしたら仕事に出かけます。(if later means few hours) ...


4

This is just ので, as you surmised. Since the sentence ends there, it probably refers to something the speaker said just before this. Here you could translate the ので/んで kind of like the ", you see." in "There's a wide variety (of goods etc), you see.", although in many contexts this would sound weird in English.


2

You can think a verb like 考え(て) or して is omitted after と. Volitional + と is a very common pattern, and it can be translated simply as "thinking ~", "trying to ~" or "in order to ~". Despite its name, quotative-と has a wide variety of usages, and it doesn't have to mark something actually said by someone. Note that none of the examples in this link includes ...


5

私に何かできること translates to a noun phrase "something I can do". This こと is not a particle but a simple noun meaning "thing". And 私に何かできる is a relative clause that modifies こと. This seems to be the first time you asked about relative clauses on this site, but real Japanese sentences are full of relative clauses, and you probably have seen this construction before....


0

It's short for「私に何かできることはありますか?」or "Is there something I could help with?" A similar and much more common abbreviated phrase is「私に何か用」, from「私に何か用ですか」or「私に何か用があるんですか?」. I believe the phrase in the example was created as an allusion (for lack of a better term) to this one, and by this I mean that it was likely artificially made to resemble「私に何か用」to make it '...


1

If you want to keep the structure, you could use したり~している as in 「料理をしたり、洗濯をしたり(、掃除をしたり)しているところを見かけたら手伝ってください」 “If you see (the person) cooking or washing clothes (or cleaning), please help (the person).” or if you don’t care about the structure, you could maybe use 「料理とか洗濯とか(掃除とか)手伝ってくださいよ」 “You really should help with cooking and washing ...


5

そういうつもりであげた[金]{かね}ではありません! You'd read the 金 as かね, "money", before you know they're playing 将棋. So you'd read this line as "I didn't mean that / It was not my intention when I gave you the money"... probably like 「別れるときに返してもらうつもりであげたお金ではありません。」 or even "I didn't give you the money for dating me", perhaps.. And you'd interpret: それにこれを取ったらもう終わりってことですよね。 ...


1

こう just means "like this", from このように. He might literally be demonstrating the way he was walking and how he fell as he speaks, but it's more likely that he simply used it as a filler word (in English you might use "like" in this way). As such, I believe it's used here in a similar sense as the "like" in "I was like walking, and then like, I fell, and it ...


1

あれは何ですか means "speaking of that, what is it?" Here, は indicates that the previous constituent is a topic of our discourse: we're saying we're talking about that over there. Japanese doesn't need to have the topic in every sentence; if you don't say it, it is assumed you are continuing to talk to whatever the topic was before, or that it is completely ...


7

In addition to naruto's answer, I'd like to point out that the relative clause "that" that's used in English (even in this very sentence) doesn't exist in Japanese, simply because the structure of the language is different. It might be easier to explain using examples. Let's look at your sample sentence in English. I saw the cow that ate vegetables at ...


2

Thanks to @ZLK 's comment @naruto 's answer: These are called relative clauses. They're constructed by simply writing the clause without the subject and then placing the subject afterwards. Thus, At the shop I saw the cow that ate vegetables becomes 店で野菜を食べた牛を見ました。


1

The grammatical term you're looking for is relative clause (関係節 or 連体修飾節 in Japanese). With this keyword, you should be able to find enough articles, but this answer is a good starter: https://japanese.stackexchange.com/a/14550/5010


2

In short, ~は認められず is "~ is not allowed (, and...)", whereas ~は認められておらず is "~ has not been allowed (, and...)". This (て)おらず is the negative form of (て)おり, which is a masu-stem of (て)おる, which is a variant of (て)いる. Therefore, this (て)おらず describes the lack of the continuation of a state. As you may know, おる is basically a humble version of いる. But (て)おり and ...


0

For this particular example, I would suggest against using「ながら」,「しつつ」,「するのと同時に」or anything like that. I also would not worry too much about conveying the "turn to hide"; fun expressions like this may sound good in English, but more often than not, they have no satisfactory equivalents in Japanese, and vice versa. In other words, you do not want to be too ...


3

これから熱やせきが出るかもしれない The これから means 今から, "from now" "starting now" or "soon". 4月の終わりから5月の初めの間に modifies はしかのウイルスがうつった. ~かもしれない means "may~~" "might~~". The sentence is parsed like this... 厚生労働省は、『(4月の終わりから5月の初めの休みの間に、はしかのウイルスがうつった)人は、これから熱やせきが出るかもしれない』と言っています。 The Ministry of Health, Welfare, and Labor says that [people (who were infected with measles ...


1

https://japanesetest4you.com/flashcard/learn-jlpt-n3-grammar-%E3%81%86%E3%81%A1%E3%81%AB-uchi-ni/ This link might be helpful, an example about a third of the way down is: わたしはその男{おとこ}の姿{すがた}を[見守]{みまも}っているうちに、自分{じぶん}がどれほど恵{めぐ}まれているかを悟{さと}った。 which they translate to "As I stood looking at him, I realized how rich I was" , although it looks like it is in ...


2

Here’s the technical explanation, according to ‘Intermediate Japanese: A Grammar and Workbook' by Tsujioka and Hamano (2012, Routledge). Basically they describe how Japanese verbs can be classified into two categories: eventive verbs - describing an event. For example, 食べる. stative verbs - describing a state. For example, ある. In general, eventive verbs ...


3

The first point to make is that the first sentence can work without the は (though it’s slightly informal to drop it) and the second sentence can work with a は (though it’s more common/natural to not have it). That said, there is probably a difference in the grammar, which is that あれ is functioning as the topic in the first sentence, while 今 is functioning ...


2

For the translation of sentence number 2, in its current state, the statement itself may be true (It sounds like "It has been predetermined: we will meet at Kyoto."), but since the trip was decided in the past, the translation should have「~へ行くことになった」or something similar. In sentence number 1, the "which means that" is the part that corresponds to「~ということになる」....


2

There are a lot of ways you could go with this. Informal language tends to be a bit different between males and females, for one. In your first example,「好きな季節は?」or「どの季節が一番好き(だ、なんだ、なの)?」would work. Here, だ is more masculine-ish, なんだ is also somewhat masculine-ish and softer, なの is feminine-ish. You also probably wouldn't want to use 大好き here, since you ...


6

Is there a way to use 何 with the general counter ~つ to ask "how many..." No, we don't say 何つ. We say いくつ (幾つ). If not, how do you ask something like "How many ideas do you have", where (I think) one would normally use the generic counter? You could use いくつ, as in 「アイデアはいくつありますか。」「いくつアイデアが浮かびましたか。」 etc...


1

You understand everything correctly. There is no such thing as だとする. It's とする and だ is just there because there was a noun. If it was a verb or adjective you'd just use とする. And following this, obviously you can conjugate it. Noun particles(?) like 為{ため}、様{よう}、余{あま}り, don't necessarily need に after them to function.


-1

You could say: メールアドレスが(person)さんからもらいました。 It directly translates as "[I] received [your] email address from (person)" but I think that is the point you want to get across. If you want to emphasize that it was (person) who gave you the email (like you are answering a question as opposed to stating a fact) I think replace the が in the above sentence with は ...


1

The basic meaning of the both sentence are the same. In this situation, you can emphasize your will by using が instead of を. So it is more natural to say "寿司が食べたい" in the following situation. You are asked which menu you want to eat. You are very hungry. You have little money and you haven't enjoying tasty meal these days. (Japanese people often use Sushi ...


3

It's not incorrect. It sounds a bit "matter-of-fact" and kind of "abrupt" though. Also, this largely depends on who's asking in what context. If it's your acquaintance who is about to order drinks for both of you at a restaurant, you could maybe say 「(私は)水で」or「お水を一杯」etc depending on the tone you're going for. If they're asking out of curiosity (i.e. "what ...


2

The embedded "question" in this case isn't really a question, but it is there 「あなたがどれほど頑張っているか」 is the English equivalent of How hard you're working For a very direct translation that comes out to something like I'm worried about how hard you're working Though it's worth noting that while the English sounds like something you would say to ...


5

Yes, you can safely say 水です. The implied subject ("it") refer's to "what I want to drink". Moreover, in Japanese, it's even perfectly natural to say 私は水です if there is enough context! See: Are possessive particles implied in a conversation?


3

Your guess is correct. He appends the くれる because he is "thankful" to Sakura for staying the way she is (and hopes that she does). 「その状態」 here most likely refers to her state of ignorance, i.e.「何も知らないままの状態が一番いい」. To be 100% precise, it would actually refer to 「何も知らないままでいてくれる状態」. Or, alternatively, you could interpret the sentence as implying「...


4

Yes, the subject of 何も知らない is 咲良, and this くれる is used because 咲良's ignorance is beneficial to the speaker. Of course 咲良 is doing nothing intentional or visible for the speaker, but since he is feeling 咲良's ignorance is desirable and thank-worthy, くれる is still a natural choice. その状態 also refers to the fact that 咲良 knows nothing. 何も知らないままでいてくれるなら、その状態が一番いい。...


1

In this particular case, the おう(ろう、こう、etc) or まい for a negative indicates a person's intention. So you are correct, in this context it is similar in meaning to ために or ように, although these two are more objective / place less emphasis on the internal thoughts of the person. と + a complex sentence indicates the way in which this intention is related to the ...


2

You can use ~べき when this "to ~" means "which one should/must ~". This is unambiguous but relatively stiff. やるべき作業がまだある。 There are still tasks to do. 読むべき教科書を教えて下さい。 Please tell me the textbook to read. あれは絶対に見るべき映画です! That's definitely a movie to watch! You can say やらないといけない作業, 読む必要がある教科書, 見た方がいい映画 and so on, too. You can also use plain ...


1

しなくちゃダメ、しないとダメ、しなくてはダメ are all used very frequently in Japanese, as a simple Google search (with quotation marks) will quickly demonstrate. 駄目 itself is often considered somewhat informal (compared to なりません, いけません etc)though, so maybe that's what your other Japanese source was referring to.


2

For 1, you could use one of the following: 「すみません、もう一度お願いします」 (すみませんが is okay too, but I wouldn't use it by default as it changes the tone quite a bit) 「すみません、上手く聞き取れませんでした」("Excuse me, I couldn't hear (/make out) what you just said." 「すみません、もう一回言ってもらってもいいですか」(You can use 一度 here, too. It's interchangeable with 一回 in this context.) 「...


1

It literally means people praised it, saying (/thinking that) its long (lion-like) fur and small eyes were cute. In this context と simply indicates that whatever precedes it is the words of a specific person, an opinion of some people in general, etc. So yes, you could think of it as a 'quotation particle'. Another example of how you could use it is 「...


2

That is correct.「~する必要はない」(lit. "There is no need to (...)") or「~しなくても大丈夫」(lit. "I'll be fine even if I don't (...)") are some alternatives. They have different connotations, so which one you would want to use depends on the actual detailed context where you would use the phrase.


4

This と before 続く is a "friend" of quotative-と. If I have to choose one, it corresponds to this definition of デジタル大辞泉. (文や句をそのまま受けて)動作・作用・状態の内容を表す。引用の「と」。 It says と can broadly mark "the content of an action/effect/state". The well-known quotative-と is actually a subset of this type of と. I don't know how this is usually taught to Japanese learners, ...


5

Adding onto Ringil's post. The crux of the question what I do not understand is, what kind of form is 「強から」. To understand this, we need to look more deeply into how い adjectives can be inflected or conjugated. Some background: inflected forms of い adjectives As Ringil notes, this derives from base adjective 強【つよ】し (classical terminal [sentence-ending]...


3

強し{つよし} - base adjective 強から - 未然形 強からむ = 未然形 + auxiliary む 強からん = 未然形 + auxiliary む with sound change As the thing in Chiebukuro says, む is usually used to express volitional/speculation. I think in this case, it doesn't add too much to the meaning and that 暴風雨の更に強からん事を祈る means to pray for stronger/more dangerous storms.


5

Translating this まさか as "Really!" is not wrong, but may be a bit too weak. I feel it's closer to "That can't be!", "Unbelievable!", "I never dreamed of it!", etc. It's not an intensifier but an interjection-like expression on its own. That is, it's not directly connected to the remaining part of the sentence. 自分は is necessary in this case. This is because ...


0

If I am not mistaken, one thing to add to Ranquil's answer is that 彼 and 彼女 can have the respective meaning of "boyfriend" and "girlfriend", something never conveyed through the series こいつ, そいつ, and あいつ.


6

Omission of は/を (and sometimes に) is ubiquitous in casual conversations, including not-so-serious business conversations with your colleagues. これ何? ペン貸して。 お昼食べました? どこ行く? But if you think naturalness is important, note that something like 私 is usually also omitted along with は. 死んでる! He's/She's/I'm dead! (after you found someone was dead,...


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