Hot answers tagged

5

Your attempt at translation is pretty much spot on in terms of meaning; I think all you're missing is an understanding of のではない, which is more commonly seen as んじゃない and is used to make statements into rhetorical/tag questions confirming something the speaker believes is likely true. You can read about this here and here, and in many questions on this site ...


5

Given your context, the speaker is mentioning specific word forms 食べて and 待って, and they have no grammatical connection with other parts of the sentence. To be a little reader-friendlier: 「なんでこの時は、『食べて』になるのに、『待って』になるんですか?」 "Why does it become 'matte' while 'tabete' in this case?" But few native speakers would be confused by this kind of insertion ...


5

おとり。 It's a mild command form of the verb [取]{と}る. It means (お)取りなさい, "(Please) take it." 「お+連用形。」 form as a mild command sounds pretty old-fashioned. It's informal, and used by 目上の人 (eg mother, teacher) towards 目下の人. Some phrases are still in use in our daily conversation. eg: 「お[帰]{かえ}り。」≂ お帰りなさい。 as a greeting 「お[休]{やす}み。」≂ お休みなさい。 as a ...


4

年度 is the financial year (or maybe academic year if it's a research paper), so 2020年度 would the the financial year of 2020. So why do the numbers look weird? I think in your example the year is measured in eras so 30年度 would be the 30th year of the 平成 (Heisei) era. This ended with 平成31 in 2019.


3

The meaning of that sentence goes something like this: Lights out, your mother, wrapped in something white and in a trance, let out moans of pain in the dimness. 「夢心地」is thus defined in goo 辞書: 夢のようなうっとりとした気持ち。ぼんやりとした心持ち。夢見心地。 I'd say it denotes a dreamy state that's not necessarily always "ecstatic", although "ecstasy" is listed ...


3

This arguably falls into the category of "could be answered with a simple dictionary search", but I think in this case it would be hard to know what to search for, because it's made up of arguably three different things (願って+も+ない). To answer your question, the original translation of "heaven sent offer" is pretty close to accurate. The ...


2

Both are natural, and they mean exactly the same thing. I somehow feel the former is slightly more literary or "refined", but I cannot explain why and other people may not agree with me.


2

First of all, "イッてる" is an adjective(or present continuous) form of "イク", which is basically "行く"(iku) -- to go -- but written in カタカナ(katakana). When such non-foreign words are written in カタカナ, usually it is a slang or its meaning is slightly changed. Therefore, the sentence means "Are you gone?" but in this context, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible