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4

This これ ("this") refers to the action in question, namely the pizza-cutting. くらい is used to indicate the marked noun (これ) is not difficult/important/etc. And ばかにする is not "to be stupid" but "to mock someone" or "to make a fool of someone". これくらい...! バカにしないでよね! This is just a...! Don't make a fool of me! ("This&...


3

~たら as a verb suffix has two basic functions: Expressing temporal antecedence, as basically a synonym for (possibly contraction from?) ~てから -- 「A[VERB]たらB」 means "A [VERB], then B". Expressing conditionality, similar to English "if" -- 「A[VERB]たらB」 means "if A [VERB], then B". You'll notice that these translate to almost the ...


3

Yes it's short for ~という話になる(だろう), which is a colloquial set phrase that means "amounts to ~", "would effectively mean ~", "leads to the conclusion that ~", or something like these. In other words, it's almost the same as ~ということになる. これじゃあ僕のこれまでの半月は一体何だったんだという話に(なる)。 It makes me wonder what the hell I've been up to this past half ...


3

でだ is an emphasized "And then", "So" or "Well then". で is a conjunction meaning "and then". It's the same as それで. It can be used to change topics or go to a main topic, just as "So" or "Well" in English can. だ in this context is a kind of intensifier. See: what does としてもだ mean in this sentence?


3

貪欲 is not necessarily a negative quality, unlike English greed (I may be wrong on the English connotation). It can mean something like aggressive, voracious or generally strong willpower. Here the girl says that disliking food without eating (=lack of novelty-seeking quality) implies a lack of aggressiveness, which leads to defeat in competitions. More ...


2

None of your examples is a widely-recognized idiomatic yoji-jukugo, and I haven't regarded 一途 as a suffix. Of course, that is not to say I cannot grasp the meaning of those phrases. Something like 純真一途 is simply two similar two-kanji words put together to form a (nonidiomatic) yoji-jukugo. Similar widely-known examples include 純真無垢, 美辞麗句 and 厚顔無恥. 学問一途 is a ...


2

1回の額: 1回の減給額 = per-event amount (of pay cut) 総額: 減給の総額 = total (or accumulated/cumulative) amount (of pay cut) This is a sentence that says the following two things at the same time (right-node raising): 1回の額が平均賃金の1日分の半額以内で減給する。 総額が一賃金支払期における賃金総額の10分の1以内で減給する。 If you do something wrong just once, a wage of up to 0.5 days will be deducted. Even if you do ...


2

中途半端な時間 usually refers the time between meals, i.e. non-mealtime. The following line goes: いいからいいから!あと一回だけオレに付き合ってくれ! C'mon! C'mon! Come with me just one more time! The context doesn't make it clear if this is an invitation to lunch/dinner, but it most likely is. That is why the other person, B, says この中途半端な時間から... So A invites B to lunch/dinner. But it's ...


2

"なんかもう" is typically used at the start or in the middle of an utterance when the speaker is baffled or overwhelmed and trying to figure out a way to put their thoughts into words. 色々と: "on many levels" or "in many ways/aspects. In a somewhat new and informal usage, "グダグダ" describes a situation where there are a lot of ...


2

From a grammatical aspect, you need の before 代わりに. When you use 代わりに at the beginning of a sentence, の is not needed. However 「かわいい」の代わりに「こわい」と言ってしまった is still a bit strange as 代わりに implies intentional meaning. じゃなくて (or ではなくて) can be used for both intentional and unintentional cases so this time じゃなくて sounds natural.


2

Essentially the linked answer answers the question, it is an instance of 'AということはBということか?'='(I suppose) The fact A should mean another fact B', where という is contracted to って. The twist may be that the predicate is implicit after 点滴. The sentence can be (彼が)点滴(をしている)ってことは…栄養が足りてなかったってことか? What can be dropped depends on contexts. Some other examples: ...


2

Using たら in a question at the end of a sentence is a way of giving advice or suggesting something. It can come off rude if you use it with someone you aren't familiar with though. In the text you provided, the wolf is suggesting bringing flowers by saying 持っていってあげたら? It's similar to saying "Why don't you..." in English.


2

These are not well-organized sentences since they are from an interview, and the second sentence is a bit "abstract", but they have nothing to do with poetry, haiku, famous saying or anything specific to the Japanese culture. These sentence are saying that his great ideas come directly from a "condensed mishmash" of what he wants to do, ...


2

As the comment said, a verb is omitted (or rather, a lot of the sentence). The full sentence is probably something like あんたらはいつもいつもそんなことをしている. Literally, that sentence is just "you guys always always", and so in English, the part left out is "do this".


2

泳いでいるように見えた is the only correct choice in your context. 泳いでいて見えた is grammatical but it would mean something like "I could see it (e.g., a shark) while I was swimming". -て見える takes an instant-state change verb whose teiru-form ta-form has an adjective-like meaning. 違う is a typical example of this. However, it does not need -ている to express the ...


1

完全に見切り and 最小の動作で are separated. The sentence can be それを完全に見切り、最小の動作でかわすと、.... 見切り means "seeing through", so the translation will be something like "After she had completely seen through the attack and dodged it effortlessly with minimum movement".


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