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31

In technical documents or technical news media, the name of a foreign website or company is typically written completely as-is. 米国Microsoft社のWindows 日本語についての質問サイトであるJapanese Language Stack Exchange Mass media for general public (e.g., 読売新聞) usually katakanize foreign proper nouns because many of their readers do not understand English at all: ...


18

「先{さき}」 here means "the future", "the future events/developments", etc. 「先が気になる」 therefore means "(I am) curious about the future develpments". 「さき{HL}」 refers to a past event. 「先の国会{こっかい}」 ("the last national assembly") 「さき{LH}」 refers to a future event. 「先が気になる」 Native speakers would never say 「先が気になる」 to refer to a past event. We do say, however, 「...


13

みてー is a contracted form of みたい ("is like ~"). It's an instance of /ai/-to-/ee/ contraction. 上げて is the te-form of 上げる, and 落とす is a verb. Therefore a very literal translation is "It's like I raised it and then dropped it". 上げて落とす is a slangy expression which may be called an idiom. It roughly means "to set someone's expectations and then disappoint them", "...


9

でも 私 あなたのそういうところ すきよ You can interpret it as: でも 私は あなたのそういうところが(orは) すきよ Literally, "But I like that part of you." 「あなたのそういうところが好き」 means "I like that part of you" "That's what I like about you" (implying "That's the main factor I like about you"), while 「あなたのそういうところは好き」 sounds more like "That part of you, I like it" "That part of you is favorable to ...


8

「ほおほお」 is an interjection used when one is impressed or surprised. It roughly means "Oh, is that right?" The dictionary spelling is 「ほうほう」 or just 「ほう」. https://jisho.org/word/%E3%81%BB%E3%81%86


8

I want to thank the people who are helping me on this website. In that case, how about... 「(いつも)いろいろ教えてくれてありがとう。」 「教えてくれてありがとう。」 or just 「いつもありがとう。」 If you want to sound more formal, how about... 「いつもお世話になってありがとうございます。」 「(いつも)いろいろ教えていただいて、ありがとうございます。」 Would 助けてくれて有難う be the appropriate thing to say to everyone? It would be understood, ...


8

I don't know what ぞんぞん means. (I'm from Kansai, by the way.) (In the article you found, they say ぞんぞんする means ぞくぞくする in 土佐 dialect.) The correct answer is どんどん. どんどん can mean not only "rapidly" "steadily" but also "one after another" "do...more (and more)" "do...a lot" "keep on doing" "continuously" etc. どんどん食べてください。 "Eat a lot." "Eat more."


8

It literally means "There is no excuse", or "I have no excuse". Let's break it down: 申{もう}す is the humbling version of 言{い}う 言{い}い訳{わけ} means "excuse, explanation" so 申{もう}し訳{わけ} is kind of a humbling version of 言{い}い訳{わけ} ございます (or 御{ご}座{ざ}います in kanis but that's very rare; ござる in plain form) is polite version of ある, so ございません is a more polite way to mean "...


6

So you are asking which of the following two parsing strategies is correct: ((暑いところでできる→)芋から作った→)食べ物 (暑いところでできる→)((芋から作った→)食べ物) And the correct answer is 1. 暑いところでできる is modifying 芋 as a relative clause, and this できる means "(for a plant) to grow". The whole phrase means "food which is made from tubers which grow in hot places". Why? Because 1 is simpler ...


6

He is addressed as [陛下]{へいか} ("Your Majesty"). Directly calling him [天皇]{てんのう} would be rude. Princes and princesses are addressed as [殿下]{でんか} ("Your Highness").


5

[運転手]{うんてんしゅ} is responsible for driving the vehicle like the car, the bus or the train. As you suppose, [車掌]{しゃしょう} only applies to the person who works on the train. [車掌]{しゃしょう} takes care of other than driving the train duties like... Closing door while maintaining customer's safety Informing the next station name Taking care of the sick ...


5

巡り【めぐり】 is the masu-stem of the godan verb 巡る, which means "to go around" or, by extension, "to concern". 少女を巡り can be translated as "concerning a girl", "about a girl" or "over a girl", depending on the words used with it. For example, you can use 巡る like so: 彼らは座席を巡って争った。 They fought over a seat. 3匹の犬を巡る物語 a tale about three dogs More examples ...


5

So this is an interesting translation, because what is actually being said, and the translation do not have the same literal meaning, but they carry the same general meaning as a figure of speech. In short, a Japanese idiom is being translated to an English idiom. 山は越えたよ。 Literally translates to: I crossed over the mountain. 山 = mountain は = ...


5

No, 作った人たち is "people who created (the movie)", i.e., the staff. This is simply because 作る means "to make/create" and there is no passive voice involved. The guy is saying "I could feel the passion of the creators."


5

独り言 is anything that is said to yourself, typically when you are alone. Today, 独白 is mainly used in the context of acting. A 独白 is meant to be heard by the audience, not someone else in the plot. In this sense, モノローグ is equally commonly understood. But in older novels, you may see 独白 used in the same manner as 独り言. In addition, recently I sometimes see 独白 ...


5

何となく is made up of: 何【なん】と: contraction of... 何【なに】: question-word "what" と: quotative particle "(call/say) that" なく: adverbial form of i-adjective ない ("not be"); "not being, without" As a whole it means "without 'what'", or in more understandable English "without naming what (it is)", thus comes to represent a feeling that you can't pinpoint the ...


5

ようやく理解できたんでしょうね。 In this sentence ようやく means "finally" "at last". "It seems (s/he) finally understood." I'm wondering, when is the last definition relevant? Here are a few examples using ようやく in the sense of "gradually": 人々はようやくに列を乱して*(夏目漱石『趣味の遺伝』)-- デジタル大辞泉 寒さもようやくゆるんできた -- 大辞林 ようやく秋もたけなわになった Autumn has gradually ripened. -- ...


4

The main clause of this sentence is simple: 店もあります。 There are even/also stores. And there is a long relative clause modifying 店. This という is quotative-と followed by 言う, but is a very common combination used to describe a following noun. See my previous answer for examples. In this case, you can use "where" or "in which". ~という店もあります。 There are even ...


4

Just weighing in to say that I found this entry regarding ためらいがちに: 思い切ることができず、半ば思いとどまりながら物事を行うさま。躊躇しつつ行う様子。 "To perform an action with the underlying thought of giving it up; not being able to make up one's mind completely. To perform an action hesitantly." So I'd say you're correct in your assessment. Somebody else may answer you on your made-up ...


4

辞典(じてん): dictionary 辞書(じしょ): dictionary 事典(じてん): encyclopedia (with pictures and long descriptions) Note that 辞典 and 事典 are different words with the same reading. 辞典 and 辞書 are basically synonyms, but 辞典 tends to be used as part of a compound or a dictionary name, whereas 辞書 is more widely used as a common noun for a dictionary. Related: The difference ...


4

First of all, your interpretation of 「ひざっこぞう」 is correct. ひざっこぞう = ひざこぞう = ひざ = most technically, ひざ頭{がしら} By adding the こぞう(小僧)= "a little boy", it personifies the word 「ひざ」 = "kneecap". Regarding the meaning of 「ひざっこぞうをたたいてみるよ」, I have always thought (in Japanese, of course, as I did not speak a word of English when this song came out) that it meant ...


4

Welcome to Japanese stack exchange! Your understanding of the sentence is correct, though you should be sure to translate the が, as "but", which I think adds the contrast needed to make your sentence sound less "wonky"! The answer provided by the book is fine, too. か can be used between two nouns can mean "or", in an exclusive sense. As such, 「朝か晩に」 would ...


4

「まるつけ」=「丸付{まるつ}け」 「丸」=「〇」 「付ける」= "to mark" 「丸を付ける」= "to mark with a circle" 「まるつけ」 is the noun form of above -- "circling the correct answer". In Japanese culture, 「〇」 means "correct" and 「[✖]{ばつ}」 means "incorrect" on tests and quizes. Thus, in the song lyrics you provided, 「まるつけ」 would mean something along the lines of "calling our life, love, way ...


4

In this context, I think that 作った人たち means the people who made [the movie] I will guess a translation for your sentence: 映画を見た大学生は「すてきな絵や細かい表現で、作った人たちの気持ちを感じました」と話していました。The university students that watched the movie were saying that "they experienced the feeling of the people who made [the movie] through the lovely pictures and the detailed ...


4

The crux of the matter is that you are focused around ありません, but you should be focusing on the entire phrase 希望はありません, which you have in bold. ある means (as pertaining to an intimate object) to exist; to have, among other things. ありません is the negative form, don't have/does not exist. You should also check out this webpage about usage for existence verbs, ...


4

Yes. This は is the same as the topic marker は. These expressions were originally the start of a greeting, as in, [今日]{こんにち}はお[元気]{げんき}でしょうか ("You're feeling well today?") or [今晩]{こんばん}はいかがですか ("How are you this evening?"), etc. Over time, through regular and frequent use, the opening portions came to be used independently as simplified greetings. ...


4

From my experience, サッカー is almost exclusively used to refer to the one you use your foot for most of the time, and アメフト for the handegg version. As some fun examples of usage, you might want to check NFL Japan's site or read some of Murata Yusuke's Eyeshield 21.


3

The word 風呂 itself is generic: it can refer to a bathtub, a place for bathing, or the act/practice of bathing. In practice, it almost always refers to a bath at home, except for some set terms like 風呂屋 (bathhouse) or 露天風呂(open-air bath; can be private or shared). You can still say 風呂に入る (take a bath) even when not doing it at home (it can also mean "take a ...


3

This ~きて means ~来て (to come) おいてきて(置いて来て) literally means (I put and came here) Putting it together: 店にけいたい電話おいてきてしまった I left my phone at the store (lit. I put my phone at the store and came here unintentionally) Japanese often indicates the motion following the verb: ペンを買ってくる - to buy and bring a pen here トイレに行ってくる - to go to the toilet and come ...


3

山を越える has an idiomatic meaning, which means "to pass the peak situation of something". For example, 彼女の病気の山は越えたよ(The worst situation of her illness was over), 明日でこの仕事は山は(orを)越えるだろう(The most important part of this job will be done tomorrow) and so on.


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