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10

I'd translate it "cultural climate". Personally, I don't think it's a very well-defined word, as I often see it used naively i.e. confuses geographical, biological, inherent conditions with sociological, acquired conditions when explaining a social phenomenon. I don't know whether yours is the case or not.


9

Does this class of words have a name? I don't think so. Do words like "banana" and "indivisibility" have a special name in English? Are these words more poetic in a way? As wordplay, a poem that contains many such words may exist somewhere, but it's not popular at all. Are there other, longer, words like this that I missed? Japanese has only 5 ...


6

It's a "slurred" version of 好き. In this context it expresses he was too overwhelmed to pronounce it well, but it's typically used by a female speaker in "lovey-dovey" scenes of manga. Variations include ちゅき, だいしゅき, いっぱいちゅき, etc.


5

This ~だったら~はずがない is counterfactual hypothesis (事実に反する仮定). "If... were..., ... wouldn't have done...", implying "As... is not..., ... did..." So it's like: それに本当に自分と同じ色だったら同族嫌悪して自分から近づくはずがない。 i.e. 「本当に自分と同じ色ではないので、自分から近づいた。」 (「自分から近づいたということは、本当に自分と同じ色ではないということだ。」) It means: "In addition / Also, if they really were the same color as myself, I would never ...


5

First of all, please forget the "matching" translations you found. You're somehow seeing something totally irrelevant. 性懲り on its own means something like "learning (by a bad experience)" or "feeling like not repeating something any more". But this word is used almost exclusively in the idiom 性懲りもなく ("without 性懲り"), which you should learn as a set phrase. ...


5

You're right that the subject (須藤) shows his growth. Here, the subject of the causative verb のぞかせる is 須藤. And the object of のぞかせる is 精神面での成長. So the subject/agent of のぞく "peep out" is 精神面での成長. [精神面での成長も覗かせている]須藤 (≂ 精神面での成長も見せている須藤) ⇒ 須藤が(=subject) 精神面での成長を(=object) 覗かせている (causative "make something peep out") (も has replaced を in your example) "Sudo ...


5

This may be the first time an answer to a question on this site was "the automatic translation got it right". However, this time the automatic translation did get it right. 偽 is a fairly common prefix that can be attached to other words to mean a fake version of that thing, although it has slightly broader applications than the English word fake and can ...


5

There are two main meanings/functions to ため. One, which you already know, is the「目的のため」, used to express purpose (translating as "for the sake of", "for the purpose of", or "in order to"). The other is the 「原因・理由のため」, and which I assume you haven't come across, is used to express cause/reason (translating as "because of" or "owing to"). This is a ...


5

This ったら is not really a conditional in the way なら is, although it does look like etymologically it came from the conditional たら. In terms of meaning, it's used to gently express a combination of mild surprise and embarrassment or criticism. See here (in Japanese). There's a fairly good explanation here on HiNative, but basically 私ったら is expressing mild ...


4

With a bit more context, he is saying ははー ボウズ!! その海【うみ】ガメ オレさまに よこさんか? [...] カメを おいていけば 命【いのち】を助けて【たすけて】やると いってるんだが・・・ まさか さからおうっ てんじゃ ないだろ? So here といってる is used to cite his previous sentence (where he already asked them to hand over the turtle) and が is used with its usual meaning of "but" (and could for example be ...


4

I don't see any deeper nuance to the phrase 身を包む. It literally means 'to wrap yourself up', or in other words 'to wear'. To me, it simply conveys that they were dressed in uniforms. You don't mention the source but I am assuming it is from a novel perhaps? As with English, writers often use alternative ways to express something if they feel it is too prosaic....


4

示す to (take out and) show; to demonstrate; to tell; to exemplify; to make apparent​ to point out (finger, clock hand, needle, etc.)​ to indicate; to show; to represent; to signify; to display. This is meaning 1 of course. 見せる/みせろ show display. It means to "make (something) clear" to the school, like "show them what's wrong". ...


4

As you already figured out つーか = というか, you can see by analogy that this expression is というかなんというか in its full form. This is an idiom, close to filler. If broken down literally, Xというかなんというか means "not sure if it is X or something other". It embraces more "hesitation" than mere というか, and is used chiefly in two kinds of situations: when X is close but there ...


4

If you want to express desire for a 2nd person to do something, you can use these phrase, Aに~してほしい or Aに~してもらいたい. So you can say あなたに戻ってきてもらいたい or あなたに戻ってきてほしい.


4

決定 can be used as a する-verb to mean 'to decide'. Also from 大辞林: ① はっきりときめること。また、きまること。 「活動方針を-する」 Now, 'confirm' is just more natural in English than saying 'decide' I suppose.


4

So this is the original context: I must say in the beginning that the sequence 性懲りも無く頭を過ぎった would be hard to make sense if there were no specific context, though both 性懲りも無く and 頭を過ぎる are common idioms (see @naruto's answer). The main reason is that this expression is a transferred epithet which is not conventional. 性懲りも無く "despite one's failures" should ...


4

This 行って is not いって but おこなって ("to do/conduct/perform"). 行く and 行う look the same in the te-/ta-form in kanji, but 交流を行く does not make sense because 交流 is not a place. Its subject is the school itself, not the students. This (-て)くる after おこなう is a subsidiary verb that roughly means "until today", "over time", etc (see: Difference between -ていく and -てくる and ...


4

For the difference between うち and いえ, please see: What is the difference between いえ and うち? 宅【たく】 is not used as a standalone noun. This kanji is used mainly as part of longer compounds such as 自宅, 邸宅 or 宅地. Or did you hear お宅【おたく】? お宅 is an honorific expression used to refer to someone else's home respectfully. お宅 is also a blunt and/or nerdy second-person ...


4

Yes, this is a fixed pattern that requires two も's. It's hard to explain "why", but Japanese も can be used twice to list two similar things (e.g., 国語も英語も得意です, 泣いても笑ってもこれで最後だ). Meaning of 「X 一緒なら Y 一緒」 What nuances do the も…ば…も structure carry? What is the grammar behind もなければ、なければ? JGram: も~ば~も What nuance would be different if は were to be used? Simply,...


4

For verbs that end in つ, the imperative (command) form ends in て. It's just a coincidence that that looks similar to the same verb in て form. And yes, the pronunciation is not the same, as indicated by the lack of the small つ.


4

最多 is "the most (in numbers)". But "一日の感染者数" means "the number of people infected PER DAY". So it's NOT talking about the number of people infected IN TOTAL. For example: One day 10 people get infected. Another day maybe 12, other 8. In that case, "一日の感染者数の最多" would be 12. Now, yesterday 20 people newly get infected, so it can be said 一日の感染者数の最多が更新された. ...


4

This ~もクソも(ない) is a dirty version of ~も何も(ない) described here and here. In slangy speech, 何 in ~も何も can be replaced by クソ, ヘチマ, へったくれ, etc., which are basically metaphors for crappy/meaningless things (see this discussion in Japanese). In this context, he is saying asking "何(か)" to him is meaningless. 何してるの? What are you doing? 何かもクソも、寝るだけだよ。 = ...


4

You should remember this set phrase as 手を抜く, which means "to cut corners" or "to get lazy". 抜く is a simple transitive verb that means "to omit" here. Its variations can be explained by the basic grammar rules. In potential form, を can be replaced by が, so we can say 手が抜ける / 手が抜けない as well as 手を抜ける / 手を抜けない. See: The difference between が and を with the ...


3

"It's my duty as student president to correct the behavior of my classmates. [Part I'm not sure about] ... I'll give you some guidance." I think you have understood the nuance of the sentence almost perfectly. I am surprised you can't fill the gap of the part where you are unsure easily since you have understood 「...素行を正す」: "correct the behavior...". and 「...


3

These questions are fairly similar, but certainly not identical. I would translate these sentences like this: どんなマンガが好きですか? What kind of manga do you like? Versus, 好きなマンガはなんですか? What manga do you like? The important difference is that when you ask about 好きなマンガ, you are asking for specific manga that the person likes, versus どんなマンガ which ...


3

The structure てある is used to indicate that somebody has of their own volition performed a deliberate preparatory action on an object. Intransitive verbs have no object to perform the action on. Basically, てある describes states of being which have resulted in an object having been acted on to completion, usually with a specific goal in mind for that object. ...


3

(Using the example sentences from the links you provided.) 使わないものはクローゼットにしまってあります。 tsukawanai mono wa kurōzetto ni shimatte arimasu. I leave things that I do not use in my closet. Here しまって is the te-form of the transitive verb しまう "to put away / to store". 窓が[閉まって]{しまって}います。 mado ga shimatte imasu. The window was/is closed. Here しまって ...


3

It means "end up". それがどれだけ無意味なもんかすぐに思い知る羽目になるだろさ‌ You'll soon end up realizing how meaningless they (=things you've learned) are. Here "realizing how meaningless they are" is something unpleasant to the listener.


3

Yes this ~だけに means "exactly because ~", "~, and for that very reason", etc. いい人そうな方ですが… He seems nice/honest/earnest, however... いい人なだけに… it's such a person who... exactly because he is an "honest" person... ね you know (what I mean). So instead of explicitly saying the last part of the sentence, this person said ね, which is working ...


3

「あの店は今、3割引のセールをしています。」"I suspect it means 30% , but maybe it means 33.3% which is 1/3?" "In any case I don’t understand the logic behind this." According to コトバンク, etymologically speaking,「割{わり}」comes from「把利・和利」 which was used for the unit of tax.「把」 was defined as 1/10 of a bundle of rice harvest and some「把」was paid to the mayor. I am not sure where 「和利」 ...


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