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13

でも うちで売ってるアイスじゃないんじゃないかしら 「~じゃないかしら。」「~じゃないかな。」 can mean "I suspect..." "I think..." "Isn't it...?" うちで売ってるアイス means "ice cream that's sold in our shop". (うちで売ってる is a relative clause that modifies アイス.) So the sentence basically means... "But, it is not the ice cream that we sell, is it?" "But, I think it is not the ice cream that we sell."


9

Yes. エセ = 似非 = pseudo; fake; quack; etc. (似非関西弁、似非医者、似非学問, etc.) インテリ = intellectual


6

「チャラにする」 is an often-used colloquial/slangy expreession meaning "to call it even", "to forgive a debt", etc. The more formal and synonymous phrases would include: 「帳消{ちょうけ}しにする」、「差{さ}し引{ひ}きゼロにする」、「相殺{そうさい}する」, etc. 「チャラ」 by itself means "banter", "wise-cracking", etc. It is, however, rarely used by itself.  If you are familiar with the word 「おべんちゃら」 ...


5

Here's the difference. 会うべき人がいます。/会うべき人がいる。 There is someone you should meet. 会うべき人がいるはずです。/会うべき人がいるはずだ。 There must be someone you should meet. I believe there is someone you should meet. This はず(だ) is a basic grammatical pattern, so please read the following articles: Maggie Sensei: How to use はず ( = hazu) Tae Kim's Guide to Learning ...


5

The sentence can be changed to ドイツ語で読んだことがある本. の is used as a subject marker in some cases. したことがある means "have experience in doing", and present perfect tense is used for it such as "Have you been to Japan?(日本に行ったことがありますか?). ドイツ語で読んだことがある本 is a relative clause. It is translated as "The book that you have read before in German". It means almost the same ...


5

If it gets rewritten as: 今の(を)ちゃんと[討伐補佐]{とうばつほさ}に数えておけよ I think you get the gist of it. But to make sure, though, 討伐, in this case, is the act of taking down the titan, and 補佐 is assistance. That whole phrase can be translated as just kill assist. While 数える usually means to count, I'd translate it as add on to in this case. The ておく form has a ton of ...


5

I think かわいい doesn't have a negative nuance even if it is used for adults. Not only Japanese elementary school students but also even Japanese adult women often use the word かわいい. Japanese people, especially women, say it to everything as a word of praise. They use it to things because of not only its superficial cuteness but also its interior cuteness and ...


4

This could be pretty loosely translated something like "You got nothin' to do?" or "Somebody's got a lot of free time," said in a sarcastic manner. Thus, I'd say it would fall under the "spare/free time" category.


4

The text on the right reads 有田焼 (Arita-yaki), which is porcelain produced in the Arita (Saga-ken) region. The text on the left reads 弐峰, which is a particular maker of Arita-yaki, but I don't know how to read the name. Maybe Futamine?


4

向こう側 refers to a place beyond some landmark, e.g., 虹の向こう側 "somewhere over the rainbow", 地平線の向こう側 "a faraway place beyond the horizon". Judging from the explanation of the book of the same title (NSFW), this word seems to figuratively refer to an extremely fetish interest of 僕, a person who has "gone too far" in terms of sexual interest. I don't know what the ...


4

The word itself is nothing lewd. It's an intentional nonstandard spelling of ご奉仕【ほうし】 "serve / service to somebody". ご is the polite/humble prefix that usually doesn't translate into anything in English. For the connotation of using the long vowel mark instead of う, see: Why is it spelled やっほー instead of やっほう? ー vs small kana vs long kana for writing long ...


4

"入門者向け" is used when you should be instructed by teacher , instructor, person who can teach properly. "初心者向け" can be used by when you have just started to practice sports, video games, etc. When you use it, you do not need a person who certify your level of sports, video games, etc. "初級者向け" is used when the level of something already set, such as books of ...


3

Because 漢字 are not words, it can’t generally be said that they have, by themselves, a meaning. Chinese characters used to function as stand-alone words in classical Chinese, a language that was ‘fossilized’ (as a literary language) already in the 3rd century BCE (whenceforth it only became increasingly different from actual, spoken language). They were ...


3

多過ぎる works as an intransitive verb, and 多すぎて is its te-form. This te-form describes a reason/cause. Recheck the grammar of ~過ぎる. 気が張る is a set phrase that means "to feel nervous", "one's nerve is stretched". 気が張っている is its progressive form. せい is a special noun (形式名詞) which translates to "due to", "because of". (This seems to be categorized as a N3 grammar ...


3

やって is basically just the te-form of the verb やる, which has various meanings. As @Leebo points out, most expressions in the form やって + another verb can be understood using the ordinary grammar of subsidiary verbs such as (て)みる or (て)くる. やってみる: to try doing (it). See: What is the difference between "verb+て+みる" and "verb+(よ)う+とする"? やっていく: ...


3

It is actually much simpler than you appear to somewhat firmly believe. To give you the answer first, you can say: 「私は、柳{やなぎ}(の木{き})ではなく、風{かぜ}である/です。」 「なく」is the 連用形{れんようけい} ("continuative form") of the adjective 「ない」; therefore, it can be correctly used mid-sentence and the sentence can still continue on. Use of 連用形 would surely help you write ...


3

原作を消化する normally means "to consume/finish the (large amount of volumes of the) original (comic) version", i.e., "to read (up)". It corresponds to "to deal with a large amount of task" in the dictionary. But if you heard it out of nowhere in a next episode's preview of an anime, I think it's a metafictional joke, like "we're going to make/show the anime ...


3

I agree with you that this sentence is a bit hard to follow, but the only reasonable reading is that this オッサン refers to himself. The sentence contains a few nuanced words: いい歳(年): a fixed phrase that can be understood "an age that is old enough", but you can take that the whole wording 「いい年して」 corresponds to "despite one's age" (see What is the meaning of ...


3

I think summer project is a good working translation. The dictionary entry suggests it could be literally anything you've done of your own initiative and have achieved, but I did a google search, and there are mainly results for arts & crafts-y type things in the summer e.g. some young children doing calligraphy, some older children doing painting, this ...


3

一概に on its own is not "unconditionally" but "collectively" or "generically". 一概に言う/一概に述べる means "to say (something) collectively" or "to describe a generalized rule/answer/characteristic". 一概に言う: to describe (something) collectively 一概に言える: to be able to describe (something) collectively 一概に言えること: (relative clause) something that one can describe ...


3

All those sentences can be question ("Ready?") or predicative ("Ready."). 準備はいい (junbi wa ii) Q: lit. "(Are you) well-prepared?" ~ "Are you ready?" P: lit. "(I am) indeed well-prepared." This one is based on an idiom 準備がいい "well-prepared". If you use the exact phrase in question, it becomes almost equivalent to English "Are you ready?", or "Have you done ...


2

Let's look at the pieces of your phrase. 日【ひ】 is just "day", pretty straightforward there. 跡【あと】 is the "afters" of something, "leftovers" or "marks" or "scars", the impact or effect made by something. → so 日【ひ】の跡【あと】 parses out to "the aftereffects or marks left by the day". ささくれ is the noun or stem form of the verb ささくれる ("to split finely from the ends"). ...


2

「[insert a single noun/na-adj.]か!」 (exclusively with a falling intonation) is a quite viral slang/meme template for a while, where they find useful to tell roughly the following emotions with as terse as one extra syllable overhead: "Come on! Why are you so —?" "What a (f–ing) — are you?" "Like it's such a —, huh?" I believe this ...


2

Your translation is correct. ばっかり (colloquialism for ばかり) in this sentence is indeed "only", and it's interchangeable with だけ here. It's だらけ that only means "so much/many of something". ばかり has a wider usage. 美しいものだらけだ。: OK, "so many beautiful things" 美しいものばかりだ。: OK, "(almost) only beautiful things", "so many beautiful things" 美しいものだけだ。: OK, "only ...


2

願わくば: "Hopefully, ..." see: What conjugation of 願う is 願わくば, and what does it mean here? このまま: "like this"; "as it is now"; "at this rate" 穏やかなまま: "the calm/peaceful status continues" とはいかねぇ: = とはいかない, "won't pass as ~", "cannot expect ~", See: Where does the いかない in ~わけにはいかない come from? and What does 「そうもいかなくて」 mean in this sentence? と: the quotative ...


2

This ノリ is a slangy term, and it corresponds to the fourth definition here: "(getting into the) mood; (entering into the) spirit; energy; enthusiasm; rhythm; feeling". So ノリが悪い is more about one's vibes, atmosphere, etc. Simply put, by ノリが悪い, the girl is saying her friend seems bored and not energetic when they are together. 付き合いが悪い is relatively more ...


2

According to this and this, when ドロドロ refers to human relationships, it can be translated like: ugly (relationship) messy (relationship) toxic (relationship) like a soap opera I think you can use "dirty", too.


2

This is a kind of rhetoric device called historical present. It's also found in English novels and news headlines, but typical Japanese novels use it extensively. Why did the author briefly jump to present tense in this article? Negative present endings translated as past tense i am confusesd as to what historical present tense is, when it is used, etc ...


1

The verb that corresponds to 背を is 見ろ. He rephrased 俺 with a more concrete and dramatic phrase, 世界のすべて城砦に抱く英雄たる男の背. Since this is not in a casual situation, I feel を is missing before 城砦, but it may be possible if this is recited in a verse-like way. So the "plain" version of this sentence is: 世界のすべてを城砦に抱く英雄たる男の背を見ろ! Behold the back of the man (=俺), ...


1

The かしら makes this a bit confusing, as I don't think that a female shop attendant would use the word in recent years. But, this is a good example when the way you say it (especially intonation) gets crucial. The double negations are very common. Also, even the single <​X>じゃないか? could mean both (although I guess more often it is used in a meaning "...


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