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5

The て preceding 綺麗事 is the て-form of the auxiliary verb いる. Dropping the い in ている is very common in colloquial speech, I.E. 思ってる. This just gets slightly more confusing with sequential て-forms. You might think of it like this: 思う ー> 思っている ー> 思っていて。。。 ー> 思ってて。。。 In this case the second て is just there to let the person continue their sentence. So for the ...


0

1) I think this is essentially a shortened form of 思っている. 2) Apparently it is. Edit: The link I've previously posted in the answer might not be accessible for everyone, it seems - it showed a Google Books preview of a page from a paper called Sounds of the Heart and Mind: Mimetics of Emotional State in Japanese by Debra J. Occhi that was published in ...


6

"X" is not a glyph, it's a type of mark often used in manga in situations of surprise or similar reactions with some sudden emotional response. The same mark also appears above the woman on the left of the girl. (See also @broccoli's link.) The うわー written next to the little girl can also be used to convey surprise, like "wow!".


1

Its simply a more masculine way of saying you dont want to do X, where X in this case is 死ぬ。死に+たいー>死にたくないー>死にたくねぇ。When attached to the stem of a verb, ~たい means to want to do something, and it conjugates as an いーadjective.


3

じゃあ今日は普通においしいものにしよう This にしよう is the volitional form of にする. The same にする used for making choices in, for example, a restaurant order. コーヒーにします = I'll have/choose/make it coffee. The volitional form turns it into "let's have/choose/make it..." So the girl is saying: "Lets have something with an ordinary level of tastiness today." (the shop doesn't have ...


5

I believe this おめっち is singular "you" because this person is speaking to one person in front of him. おめ corresponds to お前. っち is probably a suffix explained here (oh, it's your question). おめっち is not common but I sometimes hear おれっち/おらっち, which means "I" rather than "we". And this からかわれている is not "から + 変われている" but the passive form of からかう. から meaning "...


3

This 月【つき】 means "per month". You may know に is used for this purpose, but [1日]{いちにち}, 週, 月 and 年 work like a shorthand and you don't have to say に. (いち must be used only before 日. 週/月/年 is preceded by nothing.) Examples: 年1回 once a year 1日3錠 3 tables/pills per day 1日1時間 an hour a day (not "a day and an hour"; see this) 月5本 5 episodes/lessons/etc a month ...


0

Correct, it is a free verse poem. There is no rhythm. For me, this reminds me of 相田みつを poems. See these images and see if you agree with me!


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