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0

The matter is in the permitted kanji. The kanji 稀, 'rare,' is the proper choice for the word (cf. Chinese xīliúsuān 稀硫酸 same). It, however, is not included in the Jōyō list (though it is permitted for names), so, say, chemistry school textbooks cannot use it to teach. The need to write words with rare kanji frequently leads to the phenomenon called kakikae, ...


2

量産型 (“mass-produced”) can be used in a similar fashion. It has the literal meaning when used with something actually mass-produced in a factory, but can be used idiomatically on things that are not mass-produced to insinuate they are cookie-cutter, all the same, boring, lack creativity, etc.


0

First, I’d say a word of warning: あります and います can be confused with verb conjugations in ます form (specifically present progressive form). あります and います indicate existence, like where something is. It’s similar to estar in Spanish if you know that. あります is used for inanimate objects and います is strictly used for living things. です is much more like ser in ...


7

Legend has it that a long ago, a prankster saw the sign that read 「らーめん」 in front of a tiny restaurant while walking down the street. "What a boring sign! Think I'm gonna spice it up a bit.", thought the prankster. He took his permanent marker out of his North Face backpack and changed the hiragana 「め」 to a 「ぬ」 on the sign. "らーぬん! Damn, am I creative!",...


1

There is almost no difference. To be exact, 永久 is used for material things while 永遠 is used for abstract notions. For example, 永久 is used for tooth(永久歯). Perpetual motion machine is 永久機関 in Japanese. And for instance 永遠 is used for time(時間).


2

Yes. There is the difference what environment to be mentioned. However, I think the difference is already almost listed up in the definition you gave. 野外{やがい} seems corresponding really well between English and Japanese. But, "suburbs" is bit odd to me. If you are in 「野外{やがい}」, there should be few buildings around you. So, the word is not really relevant ...


2

光の差さぬ=光の差さない Yup, this is correct. Please see the 「ぬ」 section here, but basically it's just an old fashioned negation. I mostly see it in relative clauses. As for: 光の差さぬ暗い影にうごめく、怪しい気配 You have translations of all the pieces done pretty well, you just didn't put them together quite right. The whole thing looks like one big relative clause to me, for ...


1

As you can read in the following website (https://biz.trans-suite.jp/26489), both words are currently used with the same meaning. Though, いとおしい sounds more old, since it is indeed 古語 (old language), while いとしい is more 現代語 (current Japanese).


6

It is not that one of the two is any more correct than the other; Both are "correct". Certainly, neither one sounds better or more interesting. 「散髪屋{さんぱつや}」, however, is mainly used in Kansai as explained in this dictionary of Osaka dialect. Around Tokyo (or eastern half of the country in general), it would be safe to say 「床屋{とこや}」 is far more common. In ...


5

Scientifically speaking, 湯気 does not mean vapor but steam because 湯気 is a visible thing whereas vapor is invisible gaseous thing. I think 蒸気 corresponds to vapor in English, but we don't usually distinguish between them same as in English so there is not much difference between 湯気 and 蒸気. Setting aside above, 湯気 is more common phrase in spoken language than ...


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This is what my boyfriend has to say (who is fluent in Japanese): 女性戦士 is more like female warrior, and female soldier would be 女性兵士. But depending on what you need it for, note that neither of them really sound cool.


5

Although both are on-yomi compounds, I feel 祖先 sounds more technical and academic. 先祖 tends to be used in daily conversations and religious contexts (e.g. 墓参り), whereas 祖先 tends to be preferred in biological, archaeological and programming contexts. This I think is why we commonly say ご先祖様 with respect but not ご祖先様. That said, this distinction is not very ...


-1

I'd say 連絡させていただきます is "more humble" than 連絡いたします. That said both are acceptable in similar situations.


2

でわ is an incorrect form (it's written では instead). In terms of nuance, じゃ or じゃあ are very colloquial (whereas では is not). じゃ is a bit more "light" IMO. As in, it can just be a filler. For example, じゃ、バイバイ! just means "Right, bye!". じゃあ means it has real semantic meaning - for example, じゃあ、バイバイ! means "In that case, bye!". For example it can express ...


2

警 means "Warning" or "caution"; 注意 means "Attention" ;報 means a "report" or "Notice" I am trying to provide a word-by-word break down to give you more insights, hope it helps :)


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In the weather warning context, 警報 is more critical than 注意報. Currently the Met Agency defines three alert levels: 特別警報, 警報, and 注意報, for each translated by them Emergency Warning, Warning, and Advisory. They are usually painted with purple, red, and yellow colors on a map. Also see: Forecast Services (the JMA site)


4

「寝落{ねお}ちする」 could not mean "to lie down" regardless of the context. It means "to unintentionally fall asleep", "to fall asleep while doing something", etc. As far as nuance, it is somewhere between "fall asleep" and "pass out". The safest phrase choice for "to lie down (without sleeping)" would be 「横{よこ}になる」. That is because 「寝る」 can mean both that and "...


1

While ひどい can mean "cruel" when describing a person or behavior, it can also be used similar to the English "terrible" to describe bad or undesirable (but not necessarily cruel) situations or outcomes. A common translation for あんまりひどい is "It was(is) [just] too much" though it doesn't quite work here.


8

Such overtones are not a direct function of ている but rather an indirect result of the situation you’d be using the form in. In particular, the ている emphasizes the currentness of the ability to do something, and is used on occasions where you are able to tell(/judge) from the situation at hand whether someone is able to do the thing or not (or reminiscing/...


3

You're absolutely right about いいえ not being used as "no" in most cases. I can't recall the last time I heard a native speaker actually use it. Here are some of the most common ways I've heard the meaning of "no" being expressed: 違うよ - "to differ". Speaker 1: お寿司が大好きだったよね? Speaker 2: 違うよ!お寿司が嫌い! ううん Speaker 1: もう寝る? ...


11

ひ弱 is usually straightforwardly negative and derogatory. The word sometimes has the implication of "sickly". か弱い often refers to a type of weakness that stirs someone's sympathetic feeling or protective instinct. か弱い is not necessarily negative, and you can even find articles that says か弱い女性はモテる, in which case the nuance is more or less close to that of ...


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