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Instead of trying to use something else, just drop わたしは altogether. わたしは げつようびは べんきょうしませんでした。かようびは べんきょうしました。 And it's usually perfectly fine to drop the first わたしは as well. As long as you can infer the subject from the context, you don't have to (or shouldn't) specify the subject explicitly. げつようびは べんきょうしませんでした。かようびは べんきょうしました。 Japanese is a topic-...


4

Dictionaries give multiple possible translations for a word so that you can understand the nuance of the verb. You should not ignore them. ドアを閉じる means "to close an (open) door". ドアを塞ぐ means "to block/barricade/seal a door (so that it cannot be opened)". Likewise, 目を閉じる means "to close one's eyes (usually voluntarily)", whereas ...


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がたい is really formal and limited in usage compared to the others. For example: 信じがたい話 Someone's story that is hard to trust or believe. づらい means that something is emotionally or mentally trying for the doer Thus 食べずらい would mean that is difficult to eat because it takes a lot of effort to get through it. にくい is the most general and often refers to ...


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そうして means in that way, as such, like that,... in English. 例文: どうぞ、そうしてくだ下さい。 Yes, please do it so. Synonyms for そうして is そのようにして. そして was originally shortened form of そうして, but in the present Japanese, そして has become conjunction. そして cannot be used like そうして. そして means and, and then, thus,... in English. 例文: 僕は宿題をしました。そして、買い物をしました。 I did my homework. And ...


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I came across this question while having the same discussion. The 大辞林 dictionary (3rd edition) gives 2 meanings for seppuku: A synonym for harakiri, kappuku, and tofuku, suicide by stomach cutting. An Edo-period sentence for a Samurai, where the Samurai cuts their stomach but is beheaded by a second from behind. So the difference is in the second meaning.


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Both meanings are common. To me, those two meanings are actually closely related. ざっくり or ザクッ is primarily an onomatopoeia for the coarse "friction" noise produced when you deeply cut fiber-rich objects (cabbages, pumpkins, thick cloths, etc), trample snow/gravel, or dig in the soil with a shovel. You can hear typical ざっくり sounds in this video. (By ...


9

かぶり is an archaic word, and it's used almost exclusively in this idiom in modern Japanese. It's probably an example of a fossil word (an obsolete word that remains only in a certain idiom). かぶりをふる is a literary fixed phrase that only means "to deny/reject", and you cannot put another modifier like 横に in between. When the physical motion is ...


4

tl;dr: きた is used to indicate physical movement here, like in 持ってきた In your examples, such movement verbals refer to a person, not the apartment It's not natural-sounding here to use a non-person after きた Without きた, the speaker and the apartment's locations could be separate Sentence modifiers restrict grammar/particles, enabling ambiguity Since 引っ越す can ...


2

The correct choice is 音色. In Japanese, コーラス normally refers to 合唱 or group singing, so バイオリンのコーラス doesn't make much sense. (Experts of music may say something different, though.)


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Although @naruto's answer already clarifies the current distinction between the two words, it may be good to know how come those two are differentiated. 電気製品 is literally "electric product" that covers everything it should. Meanwhile, 電化製品 is literally "electrified product", which is originally used to advertise a new modern lifestyle—now ...


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Native Japanese speaker here. "食べる物" is a phrase and is totally different from "食べ物". "食べる物" means "something to eat"; there is a noun and a verb in that phrase. On the other hand "食べ物" generally means "food", and it's considered one word. Same with "飲み物" and "飲む物"; "飲み物&...


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電化製品 is synonymous to 家電 or home/consumer electrical equipment such as cleaners, refrigerators, laundry machines, microwaves, and air conditioners. 電気製品 is less common and just means "electric products/devices" in general. Centrifuges, escalators, oscilloscopes are 電気製品, but they are usually not called 電化製品.


1

Tbh both sound odd to me... IMO the following would be more natural: このアパートには、三ヶ月前に引っ越ししてきました。 このアパートには、三ヶ月前に引っ越しました。 The first sentence definitely sounds better, because "このアパート" implies you are close to the apartment in question (so it's natural to say you came to it via 引っ越し).


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「行きたくない」would sound very direct, stilted, if not rude in this context. Saying「別に」is a little like saying "nothing in particular", "not particularly", "nothing much" in English. As a phrase it has a lot of functions and is often used to equivocate what one says. If the response is just a brusque「別に」, it means 「別に行きたくない」(I don't ...


5

You can actually write it in both ways, and they will mean slightly different things. 過ち will imply error in moral judgement. 誤ち will imply accidental mistakes. So it's better to write 過去の過ちを責めてはいけない rather than 過去の誤ちを責めてはいけない because in this case, you are not talking about accidental mistakes. Similary, it's better to write 計算を誤った than 計算を過った.


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you are collect. "○○シリーズが終わった" is right. natural. "てしまう" is like "would be end". ”世界が終わってしまう。” == "world would be end."


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過ち = your past mistake 誤ち = now mistake; normally used in text or books, not in conversation


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態度 / と / いったら / なかった/。 態度 == attitude と == (i don't know how to explain) いたっら == is なかった == bad (in only this sentence) normally ”なかった” meaning is "nothing" and this is past participle. "ない" is now participle.


5

The expression is 「といったらない」with several variations. ~といったらありはしない ~といったらありゃしない ~ったらありゃしない ~といったらない ~ったらない 『精選版 日本国語大辞典』により 状態を表わす語をうけて、それが、度がはずれていて、はなはだしいことを、驚いたり、あきれたりしていう。…ときたら大変なものだ。としたことが。とだしてはない。 ※牛肉と馬鈴薯(1901)〈国木田独歩〉「其時の心持といったら無(ナ)いね、何だか斯(か)う馬鹿野郎!といふやうな心持がしてねェ」 『実用日本語表現辞典』 主に形容詞の後ろにつき、その形容詞を強調する口語表現。「ったら」の部分は、「と言ったら」が略されたものである。例えば、「羨ましいったらありゃしない」...


2

確度の違いかと思いました。 猫だと思った の方が 猫かと思った よりも確信度が少々高い。 英語であれば、 猫かと思った -> I thought it'd be a cat. 猫だと思った -> I thought it was a cat.


3

Well, I think you have explained most points on your own, so I'm just going to make good the rest: Grammar X に優れる / X に秀でる "excel in X" These verbs only take what field they are good at, and for comparison with others you have to add ~より or ~に比べて. X に Y で勝る "outperform X in Y" This one can have both the target of comparison and the ...


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まじなう is an outdated rare reading. If you see 呪う in modern Japanese texts and there is no furigana, you can safely assume it is read のろう. Semantically, のろう is simply "to curse" in the sense of "to pray or cast magic for misfortune". まじなう has a broader meaning as seen in this entry.


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If you want to shift the point-of-view to focus on them, you could describe them/their ability with 無双・無敵・無比. 無双の美女 → Girl/Woman of unequaled beauty 無敵のチーム → An unbeatable team 天下無比の歌手 → An unmatched singer


3

今も and 今でも are almost completely interchangeable in your example. They are interchangeable in most other cases, too, but 今でも may have a stronger sense of "even" or "still". For example, お父様は今もお元気ですか is fine, but お父様は今でもお元気ですか may sound a little inconsiderate.


0

They are often times interchangeable, but of course there are some nuances that can get you in trouble. If you look them up in a Japanese dictionary, they are defined as follows (from https://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/): 結構 1 すぐれていて欠点がないさま。「結構な眺め」「結構なお点前 (てまえ) 」「結構な御身分」 2 それでよいさま。満足なさま。「お値段はいくらでも結構です」「サインで結構です」 3 それ以上必要としないさま。「もう結構です」 4 気だてがよいさま。「一つ汲んで下されと、下々にも―...


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