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1

This し simply means “and”. It means “Interpreter job can widen your view and make you grow.” や can’t replace し in this sentence because や can’t be after a verb or adjective. And し can’t be after a noun. Sometimes し means から(because). 今日は寒いし、外出はしたくない。 I don’t want to go out today because it’s clod. When し is used as から(because) like the example above,...


1

右折する、左折する refer only to cars, bicycles, busses, and other vehicles on road (I think airplanes can 右折 while on road, not flying) 右に曲がる 左に曲がる is used in various ways. この線は右に曲がっている。 コンビニまで歩いたら右に曲がってください。 鳥は右に曲がった。


4

「とろとろ」 in this context would mean "melting", "very soft", etc. 「とろっとろ」 is an emphatic form of 「とろとろ」. That small 「っ」 for emphasis appears at different places in onomatopoeias, but that is another topic. (We say, for instance, 「もっちもち」 ("sticky"), but not 「もちっもち」.) Person A: "Such a villain, he is. How many women has he made cry? With that sweet, ...


4

Just as you think, it means “I recommend the movie ‘Sea Monkey.” In this sentence, て means って or という. I think this abbreviation is often used in Kansai.


1

Because you are interpreting the English use of the word 'so' in your sentence literally as 'consequently', you are equating that to ので, but the result in your sentence doesn't follow the action/behavior. You can use だから in this sense, but ので doesn't really work this way. It is more logical. ので shows a natural or expected cause and effect behavior. 'I eat, ...


6

I think ゲームを遊ぶ and ゲームで遊ぶ are both perfectly correct. Although some dictionaries say 遊ぶ is only intransitive, you can find some transitive usages of 遊ぶ on BCCWJ, including: ゲームを遊ぶ マリオを遊ぶ 月を愛で歌を詠み、御座の間などでも花を遊ぶ 何を遊ぶかということではなくて、どのように遊ぶか 渋谷の夜を遊ぶ ホノルルを遊ぶ (although this を may be taken as a location marker) The difference is usually subtle and unimportant, but ...


1

毎~ 日本語基本文法事典 (A Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar) defines 毎 as: a prefix which means 'every (unity of time)' It is used as a prefix for nouns which express a unit of time (毎日、毎朝、毎回、毎時, etc...). It is mostly used with words of Japanese origin of one or two syllables or shorter words of Chinese origin. In Hibiya Ryuto's examples that are considered ...


3

Though I'm not sure whether a real chat room has ever existed in English-speaking world (after a bit of Googling), and I'm not sure it's the perfect match for the hypothetical concept, I know that some facilities actually have 談話室【だんわしつ】 for close or private small-group conversation. A number of diners (mostly cafés) seem to have it as a part of the trade ...


14

By definition, 型 means die, matrix, model, mold, or a tool to cast something into a certain shape. 形 means, as you said, form, figure, shape or the overall outline an object has. And naturally, 型 has an extended meaning just like that of English model (or type, pattern etc.) which stand for discrete classification of objects by certain criteria, as if they ...


2

友{とも} 'tomo' is basically not used in everyday modern Japanese. You may sometimes encounter it in literary writing, or in fiction to make a character sound archaic. 友達{ともだち} 'tomodachi' is the ordinary casual word for 'friend'. You can use it in most situations, though formally you can also say 友人{ゆうじん} 'yuujin'.


6

The English word 'some' is pretty versatile and can be attached to many other words. In Japanese, what tends to happen is that 'some' gets translated differently according to what kind of things you are talking about. Here are some examples (pun intended): 誰か somebody 何か something どこか somewhere いつか some day / some time いくつか some items いくらか some ...


4

I would suggest 「お金を貯{た}めている。」or a more polite conjugation if circumstances require. 節約 would mean you are being 'economical' with your usage of money, rather than emphasizing the saving of money. 貯金している might be alright, but I believe it has a stronger connotation of the physical accumulation of money, rather than the more abstract sense of just '...


1

For No1. You are putting money into somewhere you can rely on such as Postoffice or something for buying MACBOOK. 貯金 is normally talking about actual amount. Putting money into Banking is normally called 預金, I might say 貯金 to my friends though. For No2. You are saving money just stopping smoking Tabacco to reduce spending money than previous month in order ...


5

逆走する is the most common expression for that. Often heard on the news. Because of the aging society, incidents of elderly people accidentally getting on highways in the wrong direction, going backwards on one way streets, and so on are increasing.


1

意訳 : 私達{わたしたち}の(凝{こ}り固{かた}まった)固定観念{こていかんねん}で(物事{ものごと}や相手{あいて}の)善悪{ぜんあく}を判断{はんだん}しないで下{くだ}さい。 その善悪{ぜんあく}(の決{き}め付{つ}け)を超{こ}えた所{ところ}(field)で、私{わたし}はあなた達{たち}に出逢{であ}うでしょう。 Your super translation is more easier to understand than direct translation. 平和を目指すためには、どちらかが強制したり無視したりしてはいけません。話し合い、許し合って、前へ進まなければなりません。 Is there any original sentence related to this? ...


4

暗闇からの光 is the standard way of translating this because 暗闇から is modifying a noun, 光. See: using の with と,で, から, まで However, 暗闇から光 is still correct and understood. In this case, people feel some verb is omitted because 暗闇から without の must modify a verb. So this phrase is like an abbreviated version of "Light is coming from darkness", and therefore it sounds ...


3

So, you are already allowed to visit the place and enter their reception/guest/meeting room? And you are trying to ask for a detailed tour of the lab/factory/etc where employees are actually working? In this case, ファシリティの訪問 doesn't convey your intention; it usually just means going there and talking to someone at the front desk, which is already accepted. ...


2

I would probably say 「あいつ、"死にそう/かけてる"とか、それほど"ヤバい/ヒドい"ってわけじゃないでしょう?」.


3

つい doesn't necessarily stand for habit but that you do something unintentionally. がち stands for tendency and means that something is expected to happen to some extent frequently, whether it's intentional or unintentional.


2

A phrase like this can be asked a lot of ways, in a casual tone. Simplest I think would be: xxって何{なに}? This can be used both for meaning and also identification of objects. If you want to be specific about asking for a meaning, I'd try: xxの意味{いみ}は何{なに}? Or, say, something with two possible meanings, I'd go with: xxって、何{なん}の意味{いみ}? or xxって、...


2

Since there's nothing much to add to the grammatical analysis by @naruto, I'd just suggest some extra "best" Japanese expressions: ... that you are a soldier, and thus capable of the things a soldier can do, regardless of the fact that you are weak. In other words, being weak does not change the fact that you are a soldier. たとえ弱くても、お前は軍人だ。 (たとえ)弱かろうが、...


6

Yes, English still has several meanings, and you have to distinguish them when you translate it into Japanese. As you have correctly suspected, まだ軍人だ is perfectly grammatical, but it's appropriate only for someone who is nearing their retirement. B looks good to me. C is fine in this context, but it can be rude in other situations because お前だって is "even (a ...


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