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5

The keyword is あ ("Ah!"). In (a), the speaker is saying あ and この ("this"), which means his desire is something that just occurred after seeing the dish. In Sentence (c), the speaker is saying 一度 ("at least once", "some day") and その ("that"), which means he is thinking about the rare fish and saying he has ...


1

I think c is more appropriate than b with this information you provided. 今日はユリさんのうちで手料理を食べてみたいものだ。 I think this sentence is a little bit awkward. I think we need some emphasis in it for 心からの希望. If I make (b) more natural, I'd like to add ユリさんの料理は美味しいと評判だから、是非. The whole sentence should be ユリさんの料理は美味しいと評判だから、是非今日はユリさんのうちで手料理を食べてみたいものだ。 "Because I've ...


1

どこからか and どこかから are interchangeable in your examples, and they are almost always so. But since どこからか is a set phrase, it tends to be used by itself, modified by nothing: 日本のどこかから来た人 (natural) 日本のどこからか来た人 (a little questionable to me; see the hit counts below) In addition, どこからか sounds a little more literary to me. Here are the numbers of examples from ...


0

初めてで最後 may be grammatical but doesn't make much sense to me. The expression you need is 最初で最後. ALC: 最初で最後 これが最初で最後になると思います。って英語でなんて言うの? ~するのは最初で最後にする。 I'll make this the first and last time I ~. (But judging form the English version, you probably wanted to use causative-passive 友達に行かせられるのは / 友達に行かされるのは.)


0

If you read a lot of sentences with those verbs you will start to feel that they are used in slightly different cases. Thanks for adding all those examples in your question, it is helpful to see the distinction. Inspired by their usage in those examples (and my experience), I would say that to me the nuances sound like this: 言う feels more like it refers to &...


0

If you and the other person are talking about the decision, you can just ask "どうしてそう決まったんですか?" or "どうしてそうなったんですか?" To be more polite, you can also ask "どうしてその決定になったのか、教えていただけますか?"


1

It depends on context. ・どういう理由ですか? ・どういう理屈ですか? More polite way 「そのご意見の理由をお伺いできますか?」


4

食べる is just "to eat". It does not have the meaning of "to end/finish" at all. If you want to use 食べる to say "to finish the meal", you have to add 終える and say ご飯を食べ終える (literally "to finish eating the meal"). 済ます and 済ませる both mean "to finish". Grammatically, they are two different causative forms of 済む, which ...


5

Some of these words are not even similar to the others, so please learn how to search for the differences. I recommend you use ALC, which is mainly aimed at Japanese people, but has more definitions and much more decent examples. Jisho.org is better at rare Japanese words, but when it comes to understanding common words like these, ALC is almost always more ...


2

I would personally phrase it in the following 2 ways: 1:この作{さく}文{ぶん}の中{なか}で、(私{わたし}の)好き{すき}な場{ば}所{しょ}について話{はな}していきたいと思{おも}います。- I would like to talk about the place I like in this "essay". or 2:この作{さく}文{ぶん}の中{なか}で、(私{わたし}の)好き{すき}な場{ば}所{しょ}を紹{しょう}介{かい}していきたいと思{おも}います。- I would like to introduce (to the reader) the place I like in this "essay&...


0

In the question you stated that I am going to talk, however, in your Japanese translation you simply state this fact, i.e. 話します - I will talk. In Japanese there are two structures which you could use, namely 話したい - I want to talk 話すつもり - I intent to talk Next, if you want to talk about something I think that について is more appropriate について話すつもり (you could ...


2

I'm Mikiko Iwasaki. すみません。My name probably appears in Kanji. I am a native Japanese speaker and a professional Japanese language teacher. Historically, 「じ」and 「ぢ」have different sounds, and「ず」and 「づ」have different sounds. But in modern Japanese, they are pronounced the same in most areas in Japan, じ[ji], ぢ[ji], and ず[zu], づ[zu]. As Ellettさん writes, ざ[za] and ...


0

好きなところについて話します/話す or 好きなところに関して話します/話す The other guy is right, you can also use 場所 instead of ところ but I personally don't think it makes much difference in a conversation.


5

From what you've written, I think this is the clause you're having trouble with: 皆が想像している通りのものになる will be what everyone imagines it to be. I don't really understand why you think has to be 期待 here, but 想像する can be used similarly to mean "imagine" or "expected". So in that case: 想像している通り just means "as imagined". And then if ...


1

I think the both provided translations in English are quite similar, so it is pretty difficult to decide which one is better. The key point in the sentence is ものになる which means that it will become. According to my knowledge an appropriate translation could be Gameplay of the weapon will become the same as everyone imagines, I think. 想像 sounds more poetical ...


2

I think that 場所 is more appropriate than ところ for your sentence because ところ means not only "place" but also "point" such as "それが彼のよい所なんだ。(That is his good point.)"


2

夜が明ける is so-called "a neutral description" or 現象文; basically it's a vivid description of the event this person is currently experiencing. On the other hand, 夜は明ける is a description of a fact which is "known" to the speaker. Therefore 夜が明ける is more like "(I'm seeing) this night is dawning", whereas 夜は明ける is more like "Nights (...


1

頑張る sounds more "making strenuous effort" which can be positive or negative. It can imply you are giving it your best shot or you are just wasting energy/trifling in a different context. However, 最善を尽くす sounds one is trying to find the best scenario as much as possible. It does not sound like "brute-force". Probably, in a medical ...


1

夜が明ける describes how night is about to break in this moment. On the other hand, 夜は明ける argues with common sense that night is supposed to break.


7

The most standard way to say it is: AとBのどちらかを選んでください。 Although there's plenty of ways you can spin it: AとBのいずれかを選んでください。 Choose between A and B. AとBの中から一つ選んでください。 Pick one from A and B. AかBか一つ選んでください。 Choose one, A or B. AかBを選んでください。 Choose A or B. A、またはBを選んでください。 Choose A, or choose B. A、あるいはBを選んでください。 Choose A, or choose B. ... and so on. This is without ...


11

または and どちらか (いずれか is more the formal version, どっちか is more casual) can only be exclusive. AまたはB、一つだけ選んでください。 This a pretty strong way to say only choose one. In cases where you don't have to be so emphatic, AかBのどっちかを選んで。 is a normal way to say it.


0

[矢]{や}   :arrow [矢]{や}じり :arrowhead [矢]{や}の[先端]{せんたん}:the tip of an arrow [矢印]{やじるし}  :arrow symbol / arrow mark      (this is what is used to type out arrow symbols →↖↩↑ on a keyboard) [石鏃]{せきぞく}  :flint arrowhead (specifically, an arrowhead made out of flint stone)


3

The word recognized by laypeople is 矢じり. People simply say 矢の先端, too. 石鏃 is a technical term for "arrowheads made of stone" as the kanji 石 suggests. See this Wikipedia article. This 鏃 (on: ソク/ゾク, kun: やじり) is a single-character kanji for "arrowhead", but this is not a joyo kanji and most people cannot read it without furigana. Arrowheads ...


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