New answers tagged

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I believe the most popular form is か っ こ い い, at least among the most popular search terms cited here. However, you can test other variations and update the graph in Google Trends. Thanks for listening. Google Trends https://trends.google.com.br/trends/explore?date=all&geo=JP&q=%E3%82%AB%E3%83%83%E3%82%B3%E3%81%84%E3%81%84,%E3%81%8B%E3%81%A3%E3%81%93%...


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I did a quick search for both headwords in two well-known corpora. The results are below: BCCWJ: (Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese) 贈り物 668 entries プレゼント 3268 entries Tsukuba Web Corpus 贈り物 5672 entries プレゼント 21974 entries It seems that プレゼント is indeed more common than 贈り物. Having said that, 贈り物 shouldn't be considered a rare word ...


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This question is all but same with the following one except the word itself. どのvsどれ- can I use them interchangeably? の is a case particle which lets a noun modify another noun. Unlike English where you can directly attach a noun to another (summer vacation, Disney movie), Japanese always needs の between them. Only personal pronouns retain the rigid ...


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事【こと】 is used to nominalize (not normalize) verbs, in other words turn a verb like "to eat" 食べる into "eating" 食べること as in 食べることが好き "I like eating". 事 can basically be translated as "thing / matter" and in the case of 他人事 it means "the things concerning other people" / "other peoples affairs". Note ...


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襲う and 襲撃(する) are a wago-kango pair (wago-and-kango). They are often interchangeable, but 襲撃 sounds more formal, and its usage is limited to violent attacks by brute force. 襲う has a little broader usages, and we can say 彼を不幸が襲う, (サッカー)選手がゴールを襲う and ウイルスが町を襲う, too. 撃つ is just "to shoot someone (with a gun, cannon, etc)" or "to shoot (a gun, etc)...


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There's a very interesting article on exactly this topic. My explanation below is a brief summary of said article. https://okurukotoba.tokyo/archives/4120#:~:text=%E6%9C%80%E5%88%9D%E3%81%AB%E3%80%81%E3%80%8C%E5%90%8C%E3%81%98%E3%80%8D%E3%81%A8,%E3%81%9D%E3%81%AE%E3%82%82%E3%81%AE%E3%81%A8%E3%81%84%E3%81%86%E6%84%8F%E5%91%B3%E3%81%AF%E3%81%82%E3%82%8A%E3%81%...


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It is much simpler than I think you are putting it. First of all, if you are speaking Japanese the best advice is to learn your partners name and use that. If it is a case where you don't know their name, あなた is a fine option as it is the polite way to address someone else. 君 is often used when your are talking to someone who is below you in some way, and it ...


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As you have correctly suspected, this type of 何よりだ is a common and polite set phrase used simply like "(I'm) very glad to hear/see (that)". You have to remember this usage as a fixed pattern. It can still mean "more important than anything", depending on the context. Compare the following two sentences: 子供には親の健康が何よりです。 For children, the ...


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何より = Above all else, or sure most importantly より means more than, though it crops up in places where the translation to English seems odd to our ears. This in one good example of where simply knowing the language from a text may not assist. Why? Because if you really want to speak a language (in this case Japanese) then you must approach the concepts that ...


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一般 is so-called a no-adjective, so you have to say 一般の人. (Jisho.org says 一般 is also a na-adjective, but I don't know when one can say 一般な.) 一般のな人 is always ungrammatical, and you can never say AのなB in general. Related: So-called の-adjectives - how does の *really* work? If a word is both a na-adjective and a no-adjective, should I use a 'no' or a &#...


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I remember once I found that saibo also means cyan in Japanese but now I can't find the romaji that is saibo but means cyan.


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It depends on the context: 帰る is usually used when returning to one's own house/home/homeland, whereas 戻る is used when returning to a place that isn't those things.


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Your take is basically right. お先に失礼します doesn’t work that well because it would essentially a little unexpected — it is a given that you would leave before the guards, and plus, it’s not like the guards know or need to know you’re leaving for the day the Xth time you walk past them. お疲れ様でした doesn’t work perfectly because they aren’t near the end of their ...


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The footnoted answer to your question leads to a distinction between the adjectival “-na” and adverbial “-to” suffixes. I stumbled into an expression which seems to be a hybrid. In the Netflix version of 僕だけがいない街, Episode #1, Satoru’s mother tells him she’s there to help him after he was injured in a traffic accident. She points out, 「いろいろと不便だべさ」. This ...


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ノーマル is the simplest and the most common word to refer to this, and there is usually no derogatory implication at all. ノンケ is the second most common word, but it's slangy and argot-like. Although some people who dislike ノーマル may use ストレート intentionally, ストレート is rare in Japanese. If you don't like ノーマル, there are ways to refer to this more euphemistically: ...


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