New answers tagged

1

Yes this is one of the common ways to write numbers in vertical writing. 一九 and 十九 are both common, but the former style is usually preferred in the following situations: When you write a code number, zip number, telephone number, room number, etc. (Imagine when you read 19 as "one nine" rather than "nineteen".) When the number is larger than 100 (三千五百二十七 ...


4

Yes it's just "or (else)", but the remaining part is left unsaid because it's obvious (涙だったのか) in this context. Isn't this possible also in English? お茶だったのか、はたまた…。 Was it tea, or...?


1

Let's compare some sentences: 1A くびになっても真実を言うつもりだ。 1B たとえくびになっても真実を言うつもりだ。 2A 本当だとしても証拠がない。 2B たとえ本当だとしても証拠がない。 3A 彼が何と言っても言うことを聞くな。 3B たとえ彼が何と言っても言うことを聞くな。 1: Even if it costs me my job, I will tell the truth. 2: Even granting that it's true, there is no evidence. 3: No matter what he says, you must not listen to him. In these examples, the ...


4

First of all, 必要 is primarily a na-adjective rather than a noun. It means "necessary". ✅必要な量 ❌必要性な量 necessary amount ✅それは必要だ。 ❌それは必要性だ。 That is necessary. ✅必要になった。 ❌必要性になった。 It became necessary. If you have really used 必要 only as a pure noun, this is the most important difference you have to remember. (And I think this is why your question looked confusing ...


0

Dictionaries say 必要性 means そのものが、どれだけ必要であるかの度合い. That is "the degree of necessity". For example, we can say 日本語を勉強するうえで、この教科書の必要性はとても高い. 必要 can't be replaced with 必要性 in this sentence.


2

クラスの会えないのは残念です。 "It is unfortunate that the class can't meet." I can understand what you're trying to say, so I think you could leave it as is. If you want it to sound more natural, you could say it like this: [授業]{じゅぎょう}がなくなったのは[残念]{ざんねん}です。lit. It is unfortunate that the classes have been cancelled. (なくなる "gone, disappear" → cancelled) ...


1

歩きつつタバコを吸わないでよ sounds strange since つつ sounds literary (文語的) and doesn't go well with the latter half of the sentence タバコを吸わないでよ which is pretty colloquial (口語的). This 古語辞典 says: 「つつ」は現代語では、文語の中で用いられる。現代語の「つつ」は、「道を歩きつつ本を読む」のように、二つの動作の並行か、「今、読みつつある本」のように、動作の継続かの意味で用いられる。


1

They are very different. A だけで B: B just by/with/using A (quite straightforward) cf. A だけに B: B, true to its (name, form, nature, reputation...) being A A(-u)ばかりに B: so much A that B [some ironical result] cf. A(-ta)ばかりに B B [unexpected result] merely due to A cf. A(-u)ばかりで: only to A; only keep doing A cf. A ばかりで B: usually a negative comment of the ...


1

It doesn't make sense. Dictionaries say that ただそれだけの原因・理由で、事態が悪化するような結果が導かれることを表す. For example, 「ちょっと油断をしたばかりに、とんでもないことになってしまった」 「ちょっと口をすべらしたばかりに、すっかり怒らせてしまった」. If the speaker doesn't like to be seen as a Japanese. 外国人だけど、着物を着たばかりに、日本人みたいになった makes sense.


1

わざと is a fixed adverb listed on any dictionary. It does not inflect, and you should treat it as one word that means "intentionally" or "purposely". わざ (業) on its own is an old word meaning "action", "act" or "behavior". Etymologically, わざと is indeed わざ followed by と, but that does not mean わざで means something in modern Japanese. Basically you need to ...


6

What an unreasonable demand! :D But anyway... 鶏肉味の人参だと思って食べて 鶏肉の味がする人参のつもりで食べて ふり and まね only work when someone changes their own behavior to display to others: 警官のまねをする act as if one is (mock/play) a police officer 気づかないふりをする feign that one does not notice and not when you force yourself to feel something.


2

Usually I see "pretend" represented by 振【ふ】りをする. The basic grammar rules are verb / i-adjective + 振【ふ】りをする: 何【なに】も知【し】らない振【ふ】りをする。- Pretend you don't know anything. 気【き】持【も】ちを傷【きず】つけたくなかったから、おいしい振【ふ】りをした。- In order to not hurt his feelings, I pretended it tasted good. Noun + の + 振【ふ】りをする: 彼【かれ】と会【あ】いたくなかったから、風邪【かぜ】の振【ふ】りをした。- I pretended to have ...


4

「平凡{へいぼん}」should mean "mediocre" and「ありきたり」should mean "frequently/often happens" here. So, "ordinary, common" is not off. Probably the author would like to mention that things are not the routine. In other words, it's like normal distribution in mathematics. You will very likely to encounter a mediocre thing in the world, but at this time it is different....


3

Yes, you can use 是非 as a single-word expression meaning "please do" or "you're more than welcome". 「見てもいいですか?」「ぜひ!」 「お礼状は出すべきですか?」「ぜひ。」 It's a strong invitation or recommendation. I suppose "by all means" may sound forcible sometimes, but 是非 does not have such a nuance.


2

This 掛ける means "to pour". ~を醤油につける is "to dip (something) in syoyu", and ~に醤油をかける is "to put syoyu (on something)". These are two different ways of using say sauce, and neither is more correct than the other. 塩辛い only means "salty" as the kanji suggests, and it often has a negative connotation. 辛口(の) is neutral, and it also means "spicy/hot" or "dry (...


1

You can say お気を付けて, お大事に, お元気で, etc. For the difference, see: Difference between 気をつけて, お大事に and お元気で ご無事で is more like "I prey for your safety" or "Stay alive". Don't use it unless someone is going to be truly in danger. 大事にする by itself means "to value" or "to treasure". To say "to take care of yourself", you need an object (お体を大事にしてください). お大事に is an ...


3

あげる is not a very sensitive word to refer to giving someone something when casually spoken in the receiver's absence. But as you are concerned, using あげる is not always a good choice for telling "give to you" in person. what if I were to give someone something that I am not sure if it will benefit the person or the person might not like In this case, I ...


4

[事]{こと}なきを[得]{え}る is a set phrase meaning 大事にならないで済む, "to escape a trouble" "to get something done without any trouble" "survive without a problem". 事なきを得る(ことなきをえる) [大事]{だいじ}にならないで[済]{す}む。「出発時間に間に合って事なきを得た」 (from デジタル大辞泉) ことなきをえる【事無きを得る】 「なんとか事無きをえた」 Somehow we 「finished it [got it finished] without any trouble. 「都合よく彼が現れて事無きを得た」 His ...


0

も adds a level of uncertainty, so it's like saying "even if this happens". 心配しなくてもいい。 You don't need to worry. The も also has a softening effect. Part of the softening comes from the level of uncertainty, as though saying, "Even if you don't worry, it's okay." It's as though the speaker is allowing for the listener's potential worrying. On the contrary, ...


1

Maybe this type of も is close to "also" rather than "even". For the (subtle) difference in meaning, please see: Difference between てもいい and ていい? For example: 死んでもいい I can die (for it, although I don't want to). 死んでいい I am allowed to die (because I want to die). 行かなくて is just a te-form of 行かない ("not to go"), and it does not have an imperative ...


3

"なので" is ungrammatical when used with anything other than a noun or な adjective, so only the second example you wrote is valid. You are correct that だから and から function in the same way.


0

"Respond" is a little vague here. You can respond to a confession of murder by calling the cops. If the situation is that a woman has confessed her love, and the receiver of said confession is being exhorted to give a spoken answer, then in reality, of course, Japanese people would probably say something like 彼女が告白したんだからなんか言えよ。


0

You can use 返事 and 返答. 答える is another possibility but it sometimes has a nuance of accepting, which you may not want. You can say 彼女の告白に返事をするべきです for example. Note that ~してください means "please do ~", which is different from "should ~".


3

The word "fellow" in English is often too casually used to find an all-around translation. Moreover, in the provided context: As a fellow sweet tooth, let's go to a cake buffet. this fellow practically stands for "me, who am one of" and probably "me, like you guys". In this case, I don't think any literal-ish translation of "fellow" works. Natural ways ...


0

For calling out purpose, how about "甘党諸君?" When you want to just refer them, "甘党仲間" should be fine.


5

標識は「女性専用車」と言っている would be grammatically correct. (標識は「女性専用車」と読んでいる is incorrect.) I would say [車両]{しゃりょう}/[窓]{まど}/[扉]{とびら}に「女性専用車」と[書]{か}いてある, though. eg 「標識に『止まれ』と書いてある。」 「看板に『遊泳禁止』と書いてある。」 「注意書きに『トイレットペーパー以外流さないでください』と書いてある。」


0

In terms of meaning, there is no difference. There is a slight difference in tone, with the させ (the continuative form) being slightly more formal than させて. Because of the minor difference in tone, させ is more likely to be used in written Japanese which tends to be more formal than spoken Japanese. But it is a stylistic difference rather than a semantic ...


4

不死身 is inappropriate because it means "immortal" rather than "immune". It doesn't work even as a joke because ~に不死身だ is not a thing. (If someone is "immortal only to one thing", doesn't that mean he is not immortal in the first place?) "To be immune to ~" is ~に免疫がある (lit. "have immunity against ~"), so you can say 新型コロナウイルスに免疫がある. (Strictly speaking, COVID-...


4

One possibility is ところ. Although the most common meaning is 'place', it is also used to describe aspects or points about something or someone. For example: 彼のいいところ His good side (lit. the good aspects of him). 彼女の可愛いところ Her cute side (lit. the cute aspects of her). 日本語のわかりやすいところ Easy parts of Japanese (lit. the easy aspects of Japanese)....


2

おきに is different from the other two because it always implies intervals. X おきに always implies with an interval of X. You can't use it if there aren't any predictable intervals. The emphasis is on describing what happens at what interval. This is different from たびに、ごとに because they can be used without an "interval": 見るたびに、見るごとに美しくなっていく When used ...


1

You say that たびに and ごとに have basically the same meaning but that isn't quite accurate. Think of たびに as 'whenever' in English - describing an event which produces the same outcome every time. In your sample sentences, the 'more' is not exactly a translation of たびに but rather an inference based on the idea of 'every (consecutive) time' something happens. ...


0

Japanese dictionaries give both orthographies as equivalent [1]. The word is Japanese, and with an unknown etymology [ibid.], so both orthographies are examples of 当て字. (In fact, the original pronunciation was ぐわい, with the わい > あい change emerging by analogy with the word 合.) The graphical word is unknown to the Chinese language in either form [2], not ...


1

「事柄」 here probably means "the content" you have been taught. The content can be abstract or concrete idea. Probably there are typical examples you have been taught and the veteran officer knows the pattern new recruit tends to fall into. When you work as the police inspector, probably the one needs to improvise or using ad-lib on the spot in situations to ...


2

You are basically right. 平気: antonym for "damaged", "dangerous", "ill", "negatively affected", etc. 冷静: antonym for "lost one's cool", "short-tempered", "angry", etc. 穏やか: antonym for "anxious", "restless", "bothered", etc.


2

会う can mean to meet people by chance as well as deliberately, and it can also mean meeting people without necessarily interacting with them, but 顔を合わせる means to meet someone deliberately and talk to them or interact with them. So "会う" can be "encounter someone" but "顔を合わせる" is more like "interact with someone".


5

There are two main meanings/functions to ため. One, which you already know, is the「目的のため」, used to express purpose (translating as "for the sake of", "for the purpose of", or "in order to"). The other is the 「原因・理由のため」, and which I assume you haven't come across, is used to express cause/reason (translating as "because of" or "owing to"). This is a ...


0

This「ため」is conjunction which means "result". It was "purpose" before the construction of the dam. 「ダムを建設するために、村は湖の底にしずむ予定である。」: In order to construct the dam, the village is going to submerge into the bottom of the lake. And I think this 「しずんだ(しずむ)」is intransitive verb. It is not a transitive verb :「しずめた(しずめる)」. In either case, I am not sure why it is ...


5

It's quite opinion-based, but I find it mildly funny (as a joke) and works as compliment too. Your specific wording 「あ、お姉さんですか」 doesn't sound weird, except I can't check your pronunciation technically. Also, I may be prejudiced but Americans are generally regarded fond of jokes, so you don't have to worry much if the specific one bombed.


3

The structure てある is used to indicate that somebody has of their own volition performed a deliberate preparatory action on an object. Intransitive verbs have no object to perform the action on. Basically, てある describes states of being which have resulted in an object having been acted on to completion, usually with a specific goal in mind for that object. ...


3

(Using the example sentences from the links you provided.) 使わないものはクローゼットにしまってあります。 tsukawanai mono wa kurōzetto ni shimatte arimasu. I leave things that I do not use in my closet. Here しまって is the te-form of the transitive verb しまう "to put away / to store". 窓が[閉まって]{しまって}います。 mado ga shimatte imasu. The window was/is closed. Here しまって ...


2

Can たい be used to express desire for a 2nd person to do something. No. The 〜たい form to express a desire or wish can only be used to express your own feelings and applies only to the 1st person ("I"). In particular, if you say 戻りたい it will always be interpreted as you yourself wanting to return / go back. If you want to talk about someone else (2nd ...


2

This is basically another wago-and-kango problem. 発見 is a much bigger and stiffer word used in scientific, military or other serious business contexts. You should not use 発見 in everyday casual conversations unless a joke is intended.


2

There was a writing reform of Japanese kanji after WW2 which led to these differences. In a 経本【きょうほん】 (sutra book) you will find the kanji 經, but this is the 旧字体【きゅうじたい】 or 正字【せいじ】 of 経. In modern Japanese it's usually written with the 経. This is one example. In general, how do you select from kanji with the same reading and meaning when you write? Well, ...


3

It means "end up". それがどれだけ無意味なもんかすぐに思い知る羽目になるだろさ‌ You'll soon end up realizing how meaningless they (=things you've learned) are. Here "realizing how meaningless they are" is something unpleasant to the listener.


4

If you want to express desire for a 2nd person to do something, you can use these phrase, Aに~してほしい or Aに~してもらいたい. So you can say あなたに戻ってきてもらいたい or あなたに戻ってきてほしい.


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