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1

I'm just wondering if できれば・できたら at the beginning of a sentence has any difference in nuance? In real life they're interchangeable. But I tend to read too much into things :-) Well, you asked for it... actually there are subtle differences technically speaking. できたら = "If such thing was to be accomplished" When you shout "できた!" it ...


2

Sort of. I think you might be reading a bit too much into it. できれば has a bit more formal tone, but the meaning is the same and they can be used interchangeably.


1

This may not be correct, but my impression is that with 一斉, it's multiple "copies" of an action happening at the same time such that it really only feels like one action. 一斉メール → Sending one email to multiple recipients at the same time 選挙の開票は全国一斉に行われる → Ballot counting will begin simultaneously [at the same time] throughout the country. So even ...


0

I am wondering if there is any nuance or difference between them ? Yes, there is. I'll try to explain my opinion. I am also wondering if there is some politeness attached to it ? No, politeness isn't the factor 一斉に I would say "along with" Timing is not important compared to 同時に Larger scale compared to 同時に Dynamic and impactful compared to ...


1

The word "一斉" is used when a lot of people do something at the same time. e.g. コンサート会場{かいじょう}に居{い}た人々{ひとびと}が一斉{いっせい}に拍手{はくしゅ}をした。 The people in the concert hall clapped in unison. On the other hand, "同時" is used when (not a lot of) people do something at the same time. e.g. 路上{ろじょう}パフォーマンスを見{み}ていた人々{ひとびと}が、同時{どうじ}に拍手{はくしゅ}をした。People ...


3

お疲れ会でもしよう would sound as if the professor is already pretty much determined to hold a party and expects the students to agree to join him. でも sounds a bit out of place in this case because the speaker already knows what they are going to have and there is no need to make it vague with でも. He would more likely say お疲れ会(を)しよう. This could be one of the reasons ...


1

Possibly the tag "提案" is misleading in the paper. In the suggestion of the professor, 行為者=SH and 受益者=SH/H and 決定権者=H, so it is actually 勧誘(グループ型). Between しよう and しようか, the presence of か makes it more explicit that the decision maker is the hearer, the students in the example. As such it sounds softer, and seems more appropriate because otherwise ...


0

Not a native language speaker, but I've seen a phrase in a Chinese historical romance (set in ancient times) that went something like this: meiren (美人) is easy to find, jiaren (佳人) is difficult to seek. Which in this context I interpreted as meiren referring to outer, superficial beauty--i.e. anyone who is very very pretty suffices to be called it. Whereas ...


0

Maybe 堕落 . We do say: 堕落する 堕落した 堕落するな We don't say: 堕落る 堕落い Example: 堕落した人生を過ごしたいのか? (Are you sure you want to spend your life in a state of 堕落?) https://ejje.weblio.jp/sentence/content/%E5%A0%95%E8%90%BD Not to be confused with 脱落 . Here's why... Your question is: Which is the best way to translate "disrespect" in this context? So you ...


0

This quote from Miyamoto Musashi fits this bill very well. I having been living by this for the past few months: 身【み】を捨【す】てても名利【みょうり】は捨【す】てず It is frequently translated as, "You may abandon your body, but you must preserve your honor." Perhaps a more literal translation would be, "Even if you throw away your body, do not throw away your honor.&...


3

What about something like 自分【じぶん】に誇【ほこ】りを持【も】て! or even the simpler 誇【ほこ】りを持【も】て! ? This translates to "have pride in yourself" or "have pride".


4

There are a couple of things going on here. First, you could certainly say the following. 効果の高い頭痛薬はどれですか That would translate to Which of your headache medicines are highly effective? If you were instead to drop 高い, then you're left with an ungrammatical sentence 最も効果..??..頭痛薬はどれですか First, how are you going to connect 効果 with 頭痛薬? You need some kind ...


0

ピエロ and クラウン are almost interchangeable in Japan. I think ピエロ was more common than クラウン at least before Joker's movie. Since Japanese do not distinguish l and r, I imagine "crown" which is an ornament for the king more often than "clown" which is an actor in a circus. Maybe people see ピエロ juggling ball in a pachinko game setting. However ...


2

The representative phrase that contains 姓名 is 姓名判断, which is based on a superstition that the fate of a person is determined by the number of strokes of each kanji in their name. This is surely related to 名前のつけ方 or how to name [a child]. This is a fixed phrase, and you cannot replace 姓名 to 氏名 here. Aside from this, 姓名 may be used in stiff and formal contexts ...


2

According to this chiebukuro answer, the use of のむ is dated. はい、昭和40年代ごろまでは、「のむ」はまだごくふつうに使われていたと記憶していますし、 古い人ほど「のむ」を使い、「吸う」は新しい言い方が次第に優勢になって定着したものだと思います。 (昭和40年代 = 1965 - 1974) As given in the comments, I personally never heard it used either. To me, のむ sounds sort of natural with 水たばこ (obviously due to the word 水). But I know nothing about how Hookah ...


2

The noun 思い vs 考え vs 思考 vs 思索 may sound differently using some modifier. For 1. and 2., I think you can use all 4 nouns if you explain background of what you want to say. 主観的な...を排す sounds very definitive predicate, so only 考え and 思考 sound natural since 思い and 思索 sound more sentimental and speculative the former two. 哲学的な...にふける sounds more of a mind ...


4

First I guess acceptability is inevitably subjective after all, so the following may apply only to me. Generally 思い is more about emotion while the other can be reasoning. As for 思考 and 思索, they are more the (inner) act of thinking, less of its result (though they can be). Between 思考 and 思索, there is more emphasis on process in 思索 (hence 思考過程 is fine while ...


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