New answers tagged

0

これからの話を(する)The last part just being excluded.


0

笑っちまう is the colloquial form of 笑ってしまう, here meaning something like “laughing involuntarily/despite oneself”. 程{ほど} can be literally translated as “degree” or “extent” and A程B usually means something like “B to the extent of A” or “so much/enough B that A”. I.e. 笑っちまう程 立場が 変わるぜ Means The situation will change † (so much) as to make one laugh † The ...


0

Not a literal translation but “read the room” or “feel the atmosphere” have similar idiomatic usage in English.


2

We often say ~ますように! in many situations, but in a toast, we commonly say 「~~を願って、乾杯!」 or 「~~を祈って、乾杯!」「~~をお祈りして、乾杯!」 Examples: 「〇〇社のますますの発展を願って、乾杯!」 「〇〇家のますますの繁栄を祈って、乾杯!」 「〇〇さんの今後のご活躍とご健勝をお祈りして、乾杯!」 ... We usually use these phrases in formal parties.


5

言っとき【いっとき】 is a colloquial contraction of 言っておき, where this おき is the masu-stem of おく, which is a subsidiary verb that adds the nuance of "leaving the resultant state". See this question, this chart and this article. This 人のこと is closer to "things about someone" rather than "things to people" (see this). This 言う is using the A + を + B(だ) + と + verb pattern (...


-3

As a matter of the fact, contrary to the Naruto's answer, 「何一つ」does not necessarily follow the negative indication (though frequently). As goo 辞書{じしょ} defines, [副](多くあとに打消しの語を伴って)何も。ひとつも。すこしも。「その件については何一つ知りません」「何一つ不自由のない生活」 Translated [Adverb] ( often follows the negation sentence ). None. Even an one thing. Without little left. Example [I don't know ...


9

This 何ひとつ is a negative polarity item. This means 何ひとつ is always followed by a negative expression, and 何ひとつ by itself is an intensifier. You asked about "何ひとつ in a negative sentence", but there is no such a thing as "何ひとつ in an affirmative (non-negative) sentence"! (何ひとつ思い出せる is simply ungrammatical.) The translation of your sentence is "I cannot remember (...


3

こんな憂鬱なバレンタインは初めてやワクワクイべントのはずなのに! your translation : "Valentine's day is always depressing, but this one should be the most exciting day. ". I think it's almost there, however, I am not sure about from where "always" comes. It contradicts to 「初めてや」: "for the first time". So, you don't need it and add "for the first time" into your sentence (Probably I will ...


7

This だけ means "only", and この中だけ means "only inside this (capsule house)". He said だけ because this light had its effect only within the capsule, which was surprising to him. Of course the real daylight normally fills the entire environment. Note that English "just" has multiple meanings, and "just" as in "She had just turned on the light" or "I just started ...


2

In my opinion, calling しっとり untranslatable in the context of food is a rather flippant exaggeration. The English word 'moist' is a perfectly good translation in many cases. It is common to describe a cake as 'moist', invoking the idea of it being soft or luscious. しっとり has a similar sense of a high moisture content giving the food item a pleasing feeling in ...


4

According to the search on cookpad, at the moment「しっとり」has the hit of 51,369 menus. For instance, "Gateau chocolate" :「しっとり濃厚★ガトーショコラ」, "Chocolate cookie" :「 バレンタイン♡しっとり生チョコクッキー 」, "Chicken Ham" :「しっとり鳥胸ハム」, "Banana Cake" :「しっとりバナナケーキ」, "Tofu Donuts" :「しっとり簡単豆腐ドーナツ」, "Rice flour crepe" :「もちもち&しっとり米粉クレープ」, etc. If the texture of food is "moist", you can ...


0

in sentence "忘れられない夜にする" does verb "忘れる" have the function of an adjective? Yes, because it is modifying a noun. The meaning of it here is as if the English adjective "unforgettable". What is the meaning of the phrase? It means "Make this an unforgettable evening". The "ni suru" part means "make this". Who is making it so depends on context but usually ...


5

This is one of the Seven Wonders of English Education in Japan of which my poor English is a product. Long story short, I can guarantee as an average native Japanese-speaker that 「~~ほうがいい」 is closer in both meaning and nuance to "should" than to "had better". I was taught the complete opposite in junior high school in Japan (I was indeed taught "had ...


0

does verb "忘れる" have the function of an adjective - You usually call it an embedded clause, or a relative clause (in English grammar). The meaning is: the night that I cannot forget. But you are right, technically it serves as an adjective, is this case as an i-adjective. is there any way to make Verbs have a Japanese adjective function? - Every clause in ...


7

次期族長{じきぞくちょう}に期待{きたい}されているが 村{むら}の外{そと}の話{はなし}を聞{き}くことが好{す}きな 好奇心旺盛{こうきしんおうせい}な側面{そくめん}もあるようだ。 「好きな」 is the 連体形{れんたいけい} ("attributive form") of the na-adjective 「好き」. What that means is that it modifies a noun. In this sentence, both 「村の外の話を聞くことが好きな」 and 「好奇心旺盛な」 are adjectival phrases that modify the noun 「側面」 ("side, aspect"). Thus, this ...


-1

It is just a construction describing the person, which is modifying the part about curiosity. "He is a promising new leader but someone who has a very curious side to him and likes hearing things from outside the village".


3

かぶる - base form かぶら - negative/irrealis/mizen form かぶらず - add the negation ず. ず is a way of negating a verb that is more old fashioned/formal/archaic. It's still used quite often though. Here is a link to an answer about ず: What is the difference between the negative forms -ず and -ぬ? As for the に, I suppose the simple answer is that 被る{かぶる} is ...


7

いやあ = No / why いい = say いやあ here is a colloquial pronunciation of [言]{い}えば, which is the conditional form (仮定形) of the verb 言う. いい is [良]{い}い. はやくいやあいいのに means [早]{はや}く[言]{い}えばいいのに。 literally "though it would be good if (she) said soon" → (She) should have said it earlier.


6

After seeing the context I think it means... "Come to think of it now, there was something fishy/strange about it from the beginning (but we somehow followed the command)." The は is contrastive. It marks, or limits, the "scope" of であった. (部分的な肯定?) It's like "I must admit that it sounded strange/fishy, at least partially/to some extent, if not totally." ...


-1

To answer your question in the simplest way, I'd say "では" is a formal way of answering. ではある literally means "It was / There was" (pointing towards an inanimate / non-existent objects hence, ある, animate objects are described as いる). i.e. If i wanted to say "my best friend is not an otaku" i'd say, 友人がオタクではないです (いない) There's one more way translate it if you'...


0

There could be multiple ways of understing this. One way to make sense of it (perhaps a bit contrived) is to regard the part ending in で as a single object (a noun clause). The particle は turns that whole object into the topic of the sentence. For example おかしな話で would mean "the fact of its being a strange statement" (the specific meaning of 話 depends on ...


5

The contrastive は can mark the scope of negation. (From the context, the は in ジャックは is the topic/thematic particle.) Compare: ジャックは多くのパーティに行きます。-- 肯定文/affirmative sentence ジャックは今日はパーティに行きません。-- 今日 is negated. (implying he might go on another day) ジャックは車ではパーティに行きません。-- 車で is negated. (implying he might go by some other vehicle) ジャックはパーティには行きません。-- ...


2

Under normal circumstances, the sentence: 「これはペットボトルを再生{さいせい}したものです。」 would only mean one thing which is: "This is an object/thing made from recycled PET bottles." to borrow your translation. One would say this sentence by pointing, for instance, at fleece. Fleece is made from PET bottles, which is why it tends to be inexpensive. Your other ...


1

Actually you're right From my understanding 漫画 refers to "manga", 研究 refers to "laboratory", the prefix "会" means "gathering" or "meeting" (of a group with very few members, not big enough to be called "Club") but when used after 研究 you could literary translate it as "Manga laboratory group" or "gathering of Manga appreciation" Japanese schools use "部" as ...


7

You're on the right track. 研究会 is commonly used as the name of a culture (文化系) club at high school, and no one thinks 漫画研究会 (or 漫研 for short) refers to a serious academic society. Usually "Comic Book Club" should be enough. However, there's one catch; depending on the school, the name 研究会 (or 同好会, 愛好会, etc) may be used to refer to a smaller group which is ...


3

「月{つき}の起源{きげん}」 would be just about the only term used in the real Japanese-speaking world that means "the origin of the moon". If you used 「月(の)本」, regardless of how it is read, you would need to explain what you intended to mean by that. It sounds highly fictional/creative (or plain nonsensical) without an explanation.


5

Assuming the beginning is 「どうぞ」 and not 「どくぞ」, then it is quite simple. The sign says ごじゆうに おとりください. The store owner's intended meaning is ご[自由]{じ・ゆう}に, which means "freely" or "feel free to". However, if the sign was written only in hiragana, the person might have mistook it for ごじゅうに (notice the small-sized ゅ instead of the larger ゆ). In this case, as ...


2

量産型 (“mass-produced”) can be used in a similar fashion. It has the literal meaning when used with something actually mass-produced in a factory, but can be used idiomatically on things that are not mass-produced to insinuate they are cookie-cutter, all the same, boring, lack creativity, etc.


3

You can break this sentence in two: Sentence 1: 400年以上前の白い壁が残っています Sentence 2: 建物の形が白鷺という白鳥が羽を広げて休んでいるように見えるので白鷺城【しらさぎじょう】とも呼ばれています。 You got the first sentence, so I'll skip the explanation for sentence 1. So, let's look at the very base part of the sentence 2. The base sentence is 白鷺城と呼ばれています ok, now, you want to add the reason why it's ...


2

This 姿 is modified by 芳江が泡を吹いてノビている, not ノビている alone. 姿 means "figure/picture/appearance", but it's often omitted when translated into English. This 姿もある is simply "there is a 姿, too". The topic of your sentence is その中(に), which cannot "have" a thing. (A sentence like 彼女には夢がある is usually translated like "She has a dream", but it's literally "Within her, ...


2

Your translation is actually good overall. You can split this long sentence into two and interpret them individually. 本式のメリーゴーランドの馬のように大きくはないけれど、それにしたって持って来る時は国雄さんとお父さんと二人がかりだったっていうんですもの、 It's not as large as a genuine merry-go-round horse, but still, I heard it took two people (Kunio and dad) when they brought it there! っていう (=という) describes hearsay ("...


2

君がしてくれるみたいに + 日付が変わったらすぐお祝いしてあげたかった I wanted to congratulate you as soon as the date changed + like you do for me She's saying that he celebrates (perhaps by sending him a text) her birthday at right as the clock hits midnight and the next day starts, and that she wishes she could have done the same for him. The whole thing is in past tense presumably ...


4

While my English is not as good to propose a translation phrase, I hope I can give some clues on what a Japanese reader would think of on this title. It's archaic; I must confess that this is the first time I have ever seen the word, and it's not a common word at all today. As the dictionary cites 日葡辞書, which was compiled near the end of the Sengoku period, ...


-1

I would say 1)しかも歌うんかい→(Moreover) Is he singing? (in informal words, I would say 'is he singing lol') Is correct interpretation. 2) それて上手いんかい→ I would say this interpretation does not suffice. それで上手いんかい usually follows up after he/she has done something extraordinary before. In english interpretation, I will say '(after some extraordinary action) and he ...


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