New answers tagged

2

いいですね is a conversational expression which can be used with the meaning "That sounds good!", "Good idea!", "Great!", etc. When used in this sense, I would think most people would write it with kana. (Often it would be strange to say よいですね instead.) On the other hand, writing 良いですね can also be read いいですね, but it feels like 良い is used with a more precise ...


5

As you can see on jisho.org's entry, 可愛がる has two different meanings, "to love/cherish/dote" and "to haze/beat/torment". The former is the basic meaning, and the latter is a derivative slangy meaning used by gangs, delinquent youths, sport players and such. For example, if a yakuza said 可愛がってやれ, it probably means he wants his men to beat up someone. This ...


2

クラスの会えないのは残念です。 "It is unfortunate that the class can't meet." I can understand what you're trying to say, so I think you could leave it as is. If you want it to sound more natural, you could say it like this: [授業]{じゅぎょう}がなくなったのは[残念]{ざんねん}です。lit. It is unfortunate that the classes have been cancelled. (なくなる "gone, disappear" → cancelled) ...


4

This ~もクソも(ない) is a dirty version of ~も何も(ない) described here and here. In slangy speech, 何 in ~も何も can be replaced by クソ, ヘチマ, へったくれ, etc., which are basically metaphors for crappy/meaningless things (see this discussion in Japanese). In this context, he is saying asking "何(か)" to him is meaningless. 何してるの? What are you doing? 何かもクソも、寝るだけだよ。 = ...


7

In your example, わしたショップも出来て結構経ちました it’s “Quite a bit of time has passed since わしたショップ opened here (too/even).” — or even technically it could be “Quite a bit of time has passed (since I was last here), with even わしたショップ opening.” (The scoping of the adverbial clause is a little ambiguous.)


2

One of meanings of 目当て is "target", or "something conspicuous that you eagerly look for". 2 心の中で目指しているもの。行動のねらい。目的。「目当ての品」「金目当て」 X目当てに literally means "with X as the target", an adverbial phrase that qualifies a verb, which is omitted in this sentence, but easily assumed as 来る or something like that. X目当てにさらに (enemies) が [omitted verb]! → "(Enemies) ...


0

the 目当 characters translates to "see at this spot/point". It does not say anything about "more". I think the character says that "do it mr.x attack the enemy in front of you"


4

I don't quite understand what the speaker is saying overall, but the structure is clear. [風]か[水やがらんとした空]か So it's 空 followed by か. 見えやしないか is a colloquial pronunciation of 見えはしないか (What is this や in 大きすぎや?), so the や has nothing to do with the enumerating particle. 見えはしないか is basically the same as 見えないか "Doesn't one see...?" except that the whole phrase ...


4

かたじけない is an older word that roughly means "mentally indebting". Is 忝い(かたじけない) used in contemporary language? It is an i-adjective, but you can take it as a samural/ninja way to say "thank you" (= it indebts me). しのぶ seems to be a female name. かたじけない しのぶ!! Thank you, Shinobu!! In manga, normal punctuation is rarely used so that you have to pay ...


2

奴{やっこ}さんしっかり叩いて: firmly beat him 次から: from the next time (and so on) 標的を儂たちだけに絞って: narrow the targets into only us もらおう: let's let him じゃないか: Why not? "Let's beat him firmly and let him aim only us from the next time, don't we?"


3

Translation B is correct. Here's why: "Unknown" is in the passive voice, but 知らない is in the active voice. The literal translation of 知らない物語 is always "story (someone) does not know" rather than "story that is not known". This の is a subject marker rather than a possession marker. See: How does the の work in 「日本人の知らない日本語」? To say "your unknown story", ...


3

Your translation is fine. Did you notice that 同士 is actually "reflected" in your English? I mean: subjects 同士 might be a tricky word, but not totally untranslatable to English if you bear with a disproportionately lengthy definition, that X同士 means those each of who/which is (equally) a X to each other. And this may explain why it is usually "not ...


1

Shichi-Go-San (七五三) is a traditional rite of passage and festival day in Japan, held annually on November 15, in which three- and seven-year-old girls and five-year-old (and less commonly three-year-old) boys, along with their parents, visit shrines to pray for their growth and well-being. As it is not a national holiday, it is generally observed on the ...


2

Is the stuff above correct? Looks good to me. But the real language is often more complicated and interrelated than the textbook, that is, I would call this ちゃう = てしまう an "opportunistic action", or some "I didn't expect it, but now there it is, so why don't" feeling. It'll be somewhere in between your #1 and #2. What does the 的な at the end of ...


2

優しさに乗る means to give in to/go along with someone's kindness. (NB: に乗る) The use of しまう here (乗ってしまう→乗っちゃう) conveys an acknowledgment of deriving benefit from someone. By giving in to your kindness, the speaker is gaining something. The しまおう form conveys an intention to do something. 的な is a slang version of みたいな, which, when used to end a sentence, can ...


4

So this is the original context: I must say in the beginning that the sequence 性懲りも無く頭を過ぎった would be hard to make sense if there were no specific context, though both 性懲りも無く and 頭を過ぎる are common idioms (see @naruto's answer). The main reason is that this expression is a transferred epithet which is not conventional. 性懲りも無く "despite one's failures" should ...


5

First of all, please forget the "matching" translations you found. You're somehow seeing something totally irrelevant. 性懲り on its own means something like "learning (by a bad experience)" or "feeling like not repeating something any more". But this word is used almost exclusively in the idiom 性懲りもなく ("without 性懲り"), which you should learn as a set phrase. ...


7

忘れることなど決して 決して doesn't mean what English "never" means, on its own. It is an adverbial phrase paired with negation, much like "absolutely not". Unlike English where most emphatic elements are either shared among positive, question, and negative expressions (if at all / why at all / not at all) or already fused with negative words (nothing / never / none), ...


4

ず is the 連用形 or "conjunctive form" of the negating-particle/verb ず。 What this means is that in order to connect a verb ending in ず with another verb or phrase, functioning in much the same way as ~ない → ~なくて, you keep it ~ず。 不用意に騒がず慌てないこと Here, 騒がず and 慌てない are referring to separate (though I suppose on a practical level contextually related) actions. ...


2

~心地がいい is a useful term which can be applied to many situations. 心地 (ここち)means 'feeling' or 'sensation' and when you combine it with other words, you can express a range of phrases to do with comfort. Note that the ここち becomes ごこち when preceded by other words. Here are some examples: 居心地がいい cozy, comfortable 乗り心地がいい comfortable to drive (a car, a ...


4

I'm just going to go word by word here: 慰め (nagusame) has to do with comforting someone who is grieving or suffering, and is almost certainly not what you want. 便利さ (benrisa), also 利便性 are words that describe the most standard meaning of the English noun convenience in the sense that being able to walk to work is convenient. However, it doesn't sound to ...


4

First, although I'm not sure how far what your "keeps talking even when nobody asks" implies is from my understanding, sometimes people feel compelled to relate their story to a stranger in front of them, even without clear solicitation by the listener. This is what we usually call 問わず語り. Next: My painful heart which keeps talking even when nobody asks ...


4

一通り (adverb, no-adj) means "all, although briefly". For example, 一通り理解している means one has a rough understanding of the entire topic. Your sentence means he got a brief explanation of the entire campus enough to get started. It doesn't necessarily mean every single building was explained, but it at least means important ones were explained. From 明鏡国語辞典 第二版: ...


2

I wonder how this phrase "Justice. Here. Now" motto would be best represented in Japanese. Translating this into a regular Japanese sentence is easy; something like 今ここに正義を為す should work (今 = now, ここに = here, 正義 = justice, 為す = perform/execute). However, this completely ignores the rhythmical or aesthetic quality of the original phrase 悪即斬. Note that the ...


3

First of all, do you have a good reason to write this in all-katakana? It's sometimes a reasonable aesthetic choice (see the last half of this answer for real examples), but it's not a normal way of writing these words. Second of all, do you have a good reason to "translate"? ナイトフォール・アカデミー is often a reasonable option especially when your manga is set up in ...


1

I would have liked to just comment on Ben's answer, but my reputation doesn't allow me to. I am doing the opposite, translating a Japanese website into English, and they use "desu-masu" forms. When they want to refer to their company, they sometimes use "弊社" or "私たち" as in: ユニフォーム胸部分に弊社のロゴを掲載させて頂いております。 私たちが生み出す価値のインパクトは行動の質と量の掛け算で決まります。 And when ...


0

I was recently hired at a consultancy agency to translate their web page to Japanese. I already with the basic buttons from the webpage and everything. But when it comes to translating page's information that is addressing the reader, I don't know how should I write it (keigo, son keigo?) :( In-company web pages are usually just polite formal Japanese, so ...


0

How about: 自殺は自業自得でした。 "Given his past sins, suicide was the proper outcome for his life. He chose wisely." Presumably, there will be a discussion before making such a weighty declaration (unless this is a book about the philosophy of suicide or a tattoo). In the discussion preceding this sentence, a "context" will be set. And, that "context" will make is ...


2

I think it's a general-use type of idiom, not specifically for formal or written use only. The meaning of the idiom is almost the literal meaning of the words. "As soon as I thought about it, ..." I'm guessing that the "no sooner than" translation is more along the lines of "no sooner than had she arrived, ..." rather than "arrive no sooner than 3pm."


4

I would say: 私にできるなら、あなたにもできるよ。


2

わたしが出来るとあなたも出来るよ! Verb+と doesn't work, it sounds like the other person has to wait until after you've done it. How about: わたし(みたいなひと)が出来るならあなたも出来るよ! If (someone like me) can do it, so can you! Or for example こっちでもできるならそっちも楽勝【らくしょう】だろうよ


1

Since I haven't watched this movie (I really liked godzilla vs mothra though), I hope I am not missing the context. I need help of this entry for 蒲田{かまた}くん on ニコニコ大百科. There is a dialog(probably on the scene) on it. 「この巨大不明生物が上陸することはありませんので、どうかご安心ください」: "Since this unknown giant creature is not going to land on here, please don't worry about that." ↓ 「...


2

So this literally translates into "I landed it." More like "I landed". 上陸 sounds like he came out of the sea, since the 上 implies upwards. For example aircraft etc. are 着陸 rather than 上陸. In English we might say you "landed something" as in you got a good job or achieved something worthwhile. Is that it? As far as I know such an expression doesn't exist ...


4

With a bit more context, he is saying ははー ボウズ!! その海【うみ】ガメ オレさまに よこさんか? [...] カメを おいていけば 命【いのち】を助けて【たすけて】やると いってるんだが・・・ まさか さからおうっ てんじゃ ないだろ? So here といってる is used to cite his previous sentence (where he already asked them to hand over the turtle) and が is used with its usual meaning of "but" (and could for example be ...


6

It's a "slurred" version of 好き. In this context it expresses he was too overwhelmed to pronounce it well, but it's typically used by a female speaker in "lovey-dovey" scenes of manga. Variations include ちゅき, だいしゅき, いっぱいちゅき, etc.


2

学習を習う or 習う学習 in isolation makes no sense, but we say 範囲を習う "to study a (certain) range (of topics/skills)", and thus we also say 習う範囲 "the range which they study". The phrase in question is basically 習う範囲. 学習 is another word modifying 範囲, but it is actually redundant and can be omitted without changing the meaning of the sentence. 学習範囲: the range (of ...


0

... how to read 肝心な2年生で習う学習範囲は, does it mean "the scope of learning that we study in the second grade is crucial"? The basic problem is that you've tried to translate the first half of a sentence as if it's an entire sentence. I'm not sure what 学習範囲 should be in English but the entire sentence roughly means "the curriculum learnt in the important second ...


20

Japanese pronouns tend to be inferred from context. Since there is no context here it is impossible to know whether it should be I, we or you. In real life, either in conversation or in a book you would never have just this one sentence and so it would normally be pretty obvious which pronoun is appropriate from what was said before. Without the context, ...


5

自分 is not an uncommon first-person pronoun. For example please see: Use of 自分【じぶん】as a personal pronoun in direct speech いつから only means "from when", and it is clearly different from いつ ("when"), なぜ ("why") or どうやって ("how"). Do not "extrapolate", please. It's possible that someone who understands "why" and "how" does not understand "from when". For example, ...


2

The last sentence means, 'At least give her a chance (by seeing her and explaining with your own words) to sort out her own feelings so that she can accept it'. She is probably shocked at some fact and at a loss how to deal with it. 受け入れる is the result and 気持ちの整理をつける (= 気持ちを整理する) is the process prior to the acceptance. So they are not the same but the ...


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