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To me, both (a) and (b) are correct though I feel (a) sounds more accurate as the letter 秘 itself means a secret so with める it sort of becomes a verb meaning "to secretly possess" or "to have something (that usually refers to something spiritual or a special power) without anyone's knowledge" so "to hide" in this instance and in ...


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喜んで~する is more like "to be delighted/honored to do ~". It might be okay if the subject were "I", but you should not use 喜んで when the subject is "you". Instead, you can say 何ができるの or 何をしてくれるの (if the implication is "what can you do for me/us"). 生き残る is "to survive" and 生きていく is "to live on" or "...


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"お正月には「初詣」という" doesn't make sense. On the other hand, the sentence in question would make perfect sense if it were not for 「初詣」といって: お正月には、人々は神社やお寺にお参りに行き、お守りやお札をもらう。 So I think this 「初詣」といって should be parsed like a parenthetical aside. This type of ~といって is relatively common and it works like English "..., known as ~, ...". お正月には(「初詣」...


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In this context, I would think of ...といって as expressing the idea "we could talk about New Years Day Observances"


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The question literally translates as: Is it (the) swiss Mr. Kremer or is it the german Mr. Kremer? (It could could be also Mrs. instead of Mr. depending on context.) You might be confused by the literal translation since it implies that there are 2 Mr. Kremers, one from Germany and one from Switzerland. But despite this somewhat strange phrasing (which ...


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While 不思議 itself has a few different usages, the set phrase 不思議に思う generally means 'to wonder' or 'to wonder why' (when どうして is included). You could say that the literal meaning is 'to think of as being strange', but that can sound a little strong. So the elements of your translation are intact but instead of 'think strangely', I would use 'wonder why'. More ...


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First, I don't think "grotesque" is a particularly accurate translation of 気味の悪[い]. "Creepy" is much closer and would be fine in some contexts; here, a less colloquial alternative like "uncanny," "disturbing," or "sinister" would be better. Second, nothing in this passage compares the flapping of the owl's ...


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生き残るために which is the nuance of "in order to survive" is used in a more competitive situation than 生きていくために which is the nuance of "to continue living". However it can be almost the same depends on how you use it. I think 生き残る is more concrete and sounds more demographic-conscious than 生きていく which can be your personal opinion. の here ...


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According to the article cited below, the correct counter for mermaids is indeed 一人, 二人, etc. It says that because mermaids have a somewhat similar physical form to humans and that they share the same basic emotions as humans, the counter for people is used. https://chigai-allguide.com/%E4%BA%BA%E9%AD%9A%E3%81%AE%E6%95%B0%E3%81%88%E6%96%B9%E3%81%A8%E9%AC%BC%...


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This 研究員たちが後に続いた means "The researchers followed (by saying 天使か悪魔か/気まぐれなだけか)" or "The researchers continued the doctor's statement" in this context. This 後 refers to the end of the 博士's statement (神秘の力を...). This に is merely a particle commonly used with 続く. Unlike follow in English, 続く is intransitive and you need に instead of を (see ...


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Yes, I think so. The structure is that "The flapping of wings was so creepy because it induced the smell of fallen leaves and the signs of strange creatures like the splashing of a waterfall or ~". As for the smell of fallen leaves, I think that it doesn't have cultural background but just Akutagawa's sense.


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Not わずかに, but しか does get a negative verb at the end while maintaining a positive meaning. There is a pattern: しか+ないverb meaning "only something" (positive sentence). eg: この学校で田中さんしか知らないです。- I only know Tanaka-san in this school. 朝ごはんは、トーストしか食べなかったんですよ。- I only had a toast for breakfast. For further reference. So if we breakdown the sentence ...


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“ことになった” is Passive. In this case, you didn't decide to use zoom, rather it happens that you started to use zoom. In English, we normally use active sentences (we are praised to do so too) but in Japanese, the passive form is preferred. ZOOMを用いて重要な打ち合わせをすることになったが使ったことがない。 We started to use zoom for important meetings, but I have never used it before. (the ...


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So the real answer is, Learn your radicals, and use that 辞典. If you use software like that you will not be forced to learn and your brain will not try to remember. I have several ノート from over the years, just words I have heard/come across and have thereby studied and learned. If the meaning is so easy to look up each time, you will have no incentive to ...


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This speaker is calling his/her own father 母の夫 or 彼女の夫, but it sounds really awkward at least in Japanese. While it's grammatical, the listener will probably think the speaker has some complicated reason not to call his/her own father father. The first sentence looks perfectly natural and there is almost no ambiguity. If you really care, you can make it more ...


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This 送れて is the te-form of the "potential form" 送れる of 送る. The potential form is sometimes used to mean that something was done successfully メールを送れた I (successfully) sent the email (lit. I was able to send the email) In the sentence 返事をしたつもりだったが、送れていなかった the te-form (which together with いる may be used to express a state) is used to express a ...


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It's the past-negative-potential-teiru form of 送る. This (て)いる refers to the continuation of state. 送る: to send 送れる: (potential) to be able to send 送れている: (potential-teiru) have been able to send 送れていない: (negative-potential-teiru) have not been able to send 送れていなかった: (past-negative-potential-teiru) had not been able to send The sentence means "I ...


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"Kitaku(帰宅)" literally means "to go home". It may make viewers imagine that workers go home or that come to our office as your home. If you want to know a cool Japanese phrase that means something like "return back to my roots, back to a safe place", I come up with the phrase "Gentenkaiki(原点回帰)".


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When asking people's mailing address, 住所 is the correct word. However, instead of あなた, you should use your penpal's name and title, or perhaps a nickname if you have been using one before. ~さんの住所は何ですか。 It would be even better to ask it a bit more politely: ~さんの住所を教えていただけますか。 Be sure to know how to write your penpal's full name on the envelope correctly. アドレス ...


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This is the context: 僕は歌うよ 笑顔をくれた君が泣いてるとき ほんの少しだけでもいい 君の支えになりたい 僕が泣いてしまった日に 君がそうだったように You can see the perspective is swapped symmetrically between the former and the latter stanzas. (1) 僕 (subject) : 君が泣いてるとき : 君の支えになりたい (2) 君 (subject) : 僕が泣いてしまった日 : そうだった Thus it is natural to think that そうだった could be replaced, with correct tense and mood, by ...


2

As a non-native English speaker myself, I advise you not to try to understand the English translation, specially if English is not your native language. I think it's more useful to just understand the situation in which you can use each expression, so you don't need to rely on other languages to understand those expressions. Let's imagine you are appointed ...


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It's the word 魔女 with a simplified version of 魔 which uses マ to represent the phonetics of it. You can read more about this kind of thing on the Wikipedia article about ryakuji.


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An example will help with 鈍い and 脈あり A similar line appears in Netflix’ 僕だけがいない街. Satoru’s mother is ribbing him for failing to recognize a possible love connection with a young woman who has just introduced herself. Satoru claims the young woman is merely a colleague from work. Mom calls him “鈍い” and declares the girl certainly has a “romantic interest” ...


3

ないで is the te-form of ない, but it can be a continuation marker (if it's in the middle of a sentence) or a request marker (if it's at the end of a sentence). 見ないで! Don't look! 見ないで答える To answer without looking You seem to understand this. So the real question here is "Is there an imaginary period between 言わないで and 自己申告制"? However, no one can tell ...


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言わないで is a negative command, "don't say."


3

This translation seems wrong. Even when there are no explicit personal pronouns, it's often possible to infer who this speaker is talking about. 出てます (short for 出ています) indicates someone is already away from home. It never refers to something in the future like "I will be out". This そうです is a hearsay marker, and it's unlikely to describe the ...


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So this is from 時間停止勇者. I initially thought this フォー is "four" (i.e., ショゴス is one of the four mid-bosses collectively called ダークネス) because having four mid-bosses is a very common trope (aka 四天王 or "Elite Four"). However, in a recent episode, I found that a small unnamed enemy is also called a フォー・ダークネス, so now I think this フォー is "...


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かける can be used as an subsidiary verb to mean "start to [verb]", so 崩れかけた is indeed the 連用形 ren'yōkei (masu-stem) of 崩れる followed by かけた. 崩れかけた門 means "a gate, which has started to break down / deteriorate". Of course you would usually translate this more directly, maybe (for lack of a better word) "deteriorating / wrecked gate"....


4

The label translates to "wasabi paste containing real/true wasabi" 本わさび入り means "containing real/true wasabi" [練り]{ねり} is often used as a prefix to mean "ground X" or "X paste" (for example ねりごま ≒ tahini) and the word here is ねりわさび (even though ねり and わさび are written in different fonts)


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本わさび(ほんわさび)the base ingredient in a processed mix of horseradish and wasabi. This is somewhat different to the more expensive and authentic wasabi plant because it has some kind of processing to allow it to exist in tube form. It contains some real wasabi derivatives but it is often less than 50%. See here for more details. 入り(いり)containing ねり paste ...


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It depends on the context: 帰る is usually used when returning to one's own house/home/homeland, whereas 戻る is used when returning to a place that isn't those things.


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No, that translation is incorrect. This ブレッド is "bread", not "bled". The Japanese language does not distinguish the L and R consonants. ホテルブレッド just means "hotel bread", and is the name of a kind of bread. I suppose it was so named because it is typically served at classy hotels. In general, it contains more butter and has ...


3

(Moved from comments to answer by request) 戻る means that the subject returned. 戻す means that the subject returned the object. 元に戻った means "I went back to normal". 元に戻した means "[...] put me back to normal," where [...] here is either "I" or "the medicine" (or perhaps "the act of having drunk the medicine"). &...


6

You can use either based on how you feel about your contribution to the outcome (i.e. you are now back to normal). 「戻った」is based on「戻る」. This is an intransitive expression that can be used when you feel you didn't commit to the outcome or you just want to describe what has happened. 「薬飲んで、元に戻った」is something like "I took medicine and my health has ...


4

一斉に is used when many people do the same short action simultaneously and often individually (e.g., visiting a website). On the other hand, 一緒に is just like "together"; it can be used with a long action (like 買いものをする), and it can be used when there are only two people, but it's usually not used when many people do the same thing individually. In ...


1

水際 vaguely refers to the area near the coast, the area that contains both A and B. People usually don't want to get wet, so your sentence usually means they walked through the B area, and the use of を is perfectly natural. If the sentence were something like 博士達の船は水際で魚を捕っていた, then it would refer to the A area.


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It's gonna depend heavily on the context, but it could mean a few things: The others walked along the shore... If everyone was for example at the beach but still on the dry part, i.e. they wouldn't be getting their feet wet from the tides coming in. Alternatively, if they were walking along the edge of a lake. The others walked on the shore... If ...


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I think that も might be a little more natural than を here, because it reflects the idea that it is something "extra" (like an extra activity, an extra benefit, etc.) that is "added" to the main idea of meeting up for a study session. In your translation, you could incorporate this nuance more directly by adding "also": Want to ...


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No, there is no connection between the words. The phonetic sharing of 'ya', 'ku' and 'za' is just a coincidence. The word ヤクザ is thought to have derived from the scoring system of gambling games (see this explanation), with the numbers 8, 9, 3 (= ya, ku, za) being an unwanted or useless combination. This is thought to be the origin of the name of the ...


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A simple and unsurprising translation should be 赤い雪 (akai yuki, "red snow"). If you want something more nuanced, "crimson snow" is 深紅の雪 (shinku no yuki) and "blood-soaked snow" is 血に染まった雪 (chi ni somatta yuki). By せきせつ/あかゆき, did you mean 赤雪? How did you come up with this? It's not a word recognized by an average Japanese speaker,...


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