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0

夢に触れる is not a common expression and it's almost impossible to determine the author's intended meaning without referring to the entire context. From the context, I think the line roughly means "To what extent are you conscious of your (own) dream", "How much are you thinking (or doing) to realize your dream", or something along these lines. Perhaps just ...


1

In your case, simple verbs like 語る and 話す should work because the poem is just a part of his story. Or you can avoid any verb corresponding to "tell" and say something like 彼の話は詩から始まりました. (詩で物語を始める is a little puzzling.) You may not need them, but verbs commonly used with verse/poetry include: 語る (this can refer to dramatic storytelling like that of a ...


3

This ひら doesn't mean 平(flat, plain) but ひらり. Dictionaries say ひらり means 1: すばやく身をかわしたり飛び移ったりするさま。「ひらりと馬に飛び乗る」 2: 物が軽くひるがえるさま。「木の葉がひらりと舞い落ちる」 ひらっと is almost the same as ひらりと, which means "lightly", "nimbly".


3

「ひらっと」 is not a very common onomatopoeic adverb to use in the context of passing by someone. It would, however, mean "casually", "quickly", etc. More commonly, you would encounter 「さっと」、「さーっと」、「すっと」、「すーっと」、「ふらっと」, etc. Not sure what dictionary you use, but 「ひらっと」 just could not mean "flat or "plain" in the context. You would not pass by someone "flat(...


3

「奥手{おくて}すぎて手{て}も繋{つな}げていない」 「奥手すぎて」 means: "too slow in sexual developement and ..." The whole phrase, therefore, means: "They haven't (even) been able to hold each other's hands for being too slow in sexual developement."


4

に対して and に向かって are being used in similar ways here to mean "in regards to" and "towards" respectively, to indicate who is being 呼びかけた'd. Separately, 一年生が三年生に対して『雪乃さん』などと呼びかけてしまったのだ。 means "A first year (accidentally) addressed a third year as Yukinoさん (among other things)." and 一年生が…部のエースに向かって『雪乃さん』などと呼びかけてしまったのだ。 means "A first year (...


5

Can I add ママ after any name and that will mean I'm referring to their mom? Generally speaking, no. But people often drop の between nouns when it's an important and/or recurring concept to them. For example, when two people are casually talking about 木村さんのママ, they may start contracting it to 木村ママ during the conversation. In your case, 彼ママ is not a common ...


6

I know バッチ means batch But it does not. 「ばっちい」 is an informal adjective meaning 「汚{きたな}い」 ("dirty"). https://jisho.org/search/%E3%81%B0%E3%81%A3%E3%81%A1%E3%81%84 Thus, 「バッチい手」 means "dirty hand(s)". "He keeps on touching/pressing the button with that dirty hand." This person kept biting his fingernails, touching his beard, pimples, etc., which is ...


5

「ワル」 is a colloquial word meaning "villain", "delinquent boy", etc. It is pretty much synonymous to 「悪人{あくにん}」. 「よのう/よのお」 is a dramatic-sounding sentence-ender of exclamation. It is synonymous to 「だねえ」 in meaning. 「お主{ぬし}」 just means "you". お主もワルよのぉ thus means: "You are as shrewd/bad as I!" The phrase is heard mostly in fiction and it is almost ...


0

Joshua - ジョシュア Kate - ケイト I think using katakana is the most suitable in this case.


6

出るべきところ (literally "the parts that should protrude") is a common Japanese euphemism for (usually female) breasts and hips. It's a paraphrase of 胸や腰など. 出る(べき)ところが出ている (literally "where the parts that should protrude are protruding") is almost a set phrase to describe a glamorous female person. メリハリの利いたグラマラスボディ modifies nothing, because it's just a predicate ...


2

うなじや is うなじ ("nape") + や ("and"). うなじ and 鎖骨 are the subjects of the sentence. The simplified version of the sentence is うなじや鎖骨は色香を漂わせている. ~とは裏腹に is an adverbial set phrase, "despite ~", "in contrast to ~", "contrary to ~". So the sentence is basically saying that although her overall appearance is clean, her うなじ and 鎖骨 are voluptuous.


3

「どんなスポーツでもこの三{みっ}つがなければ上手{じょうず}にならないと考{かんが}えられている。」 「でも」 in this context means "any" in the sense of "regardless of". The basic pattern is: 「どの or どんな + Noun + でも」 「どんなスポーツでも」 = "in any sports" 「どんな人でも」 = "anyone", "everyone" 「どんな国でも」 = "in any country" In my head is something like "although it's expected sports to be good, they aren't going to be ...


-1

I would go with 世界観作り. If you’d like, you could be more detailed, i.e 小説の世界観作り or ゲームの世界観作り.


4

This 'の' should most naturally be regarded as an apposition, rather than possession. So it refers to a 姉さん, who is your 親戚. Looking up a dictionary, the definition of the word 姉さん usually starts with these two: older sister (広辞苑: >「あね」の軽い尊敬語…) young lady (広辞苑: > 若い女性を呼ぶ称。) In the phrase 親戚の姉さん, it falls somewhat in between. I think "a female, comparative ...


0

A quick google search gave me this as the context for the sentence you're asking about: an online tool to search for Japanese pitch-accents on a word-by-word basis. Before we take a look at translating, let's first define some words: ・共通語 - the common language (in Japanese this is most likely going to be referring to 標準語, but depending on the context ...


0

I think your sentence is great. The only real choice left here is the tone you want to adopt. You chose a polite form of speech with lots of glue words, which conveys a certain signal. In contrast, if you chose a bit more blunt form, it can convey a stronger conviction, with more emphasis on "I". Also, since your fluency is already pretty high, I shall ...


4

In Japanese, like in English, we can use multiple question words all at once in the same question when we want to ask for multiple bits of information. 誰が何を買ったの? → Who bought what? 誰がいつどこで何をなぜどのようにしたのですか? → Who did what where, when, in what way, and why? In your question, the writer has combined 「何」(what) and 「どう」(how / in what way) to ask (though ...


1

My translation attempt is: At first glance, her appearance looks a bit stern, but actually she is just shy and innocent. I believe your interpretation of the sentence has no problem at all. ややきつめの目つき means she has somewhat sharp and stern eyes, basically describing her appearance as not very friendly-looking. 根は in this sentence means "essentially" or "...


3

「ややきつめの目{め}つき」 やや = 少{すこ}し = slightly きつめ = きつい (harsh, intense) + め (~ish, on the ~ side) The form is 「Adjective Stem + め」. The confusing thing here is that this suffix め can also be written 目 in kanji. Thus, we actually have two 目's in this phrase with only the second one meaning "eyes". 目つき = one's look or expression Putting it altogether, we ...


4

「飲{の}み友{とも}か或{ある}いはもっとより良{よ}い関係{かんけい}を結{むす}べるか」 It is difficult to translate this phrase accurately without further context because grammatically speaking, a few words are left unsaid. That is why I chose to use the word "phrase" rather than "sentence". What we know for certain is that someone is trying to choose between two options. Option A: ...


2

I am not a native speaker, but I think I have a word that will work in this case. In English, "on that note" essentially means "let's end there," or even "well then." It is a phrase that you use to essentially close a topic of conversation, table it for later, or to create an opening to physically leave if needed. In my Japanese experience, a lot of ...


1

「気」here means "feel"/"feeling" in the sense of "to feel like doing something". 行く気がない → to not feel like going やる気がある → to feel like doing (something) So 僕に愛される → to be loved by me 僕に愛される気 → feel like being loved by me 僕に愛される気あんの? → "Do you (even) feel like being loved by me?" which sounds more natural as "Do you (even) want to be loved by me?" ...


4

「あいつ にしちゃ 思{おも}い切{き}った な。」 Without any context -- without even another word or any explanation of the context -- native speakers will know two things for certain from this short sentence. 1) This dude (あいつ) made a big decision and executed it. We know that because 「思い切る」 as a verb means "to get up the nerve to do something drastic/unusual". The fact ...


0

I think the definition of jisho and goo辞書 is correct and 「激しい勢いで差し出す。」 matches the sentence you provide. Your interpretation seems almost correct. But I guess basically teachers are bidding/disciplining/educating their students rather than just presenting/announcing additional exam to them. So, I think the sentence probably means "Since how difficult ...


2

I think this song saying about the mental state of a rapper challenging free style rap competition. So based on this, シラフ seems saying rather "sane", "normal", "calm," etc. than being "sober". ミスターハスラー楽屋から火だすな ミスター probably means self proclamation to represent something. ハスラー probably means a drug dealer as you said and a rapper from their own indie ...


2

くせに doesn't change the grammatical connection. It is nothing but a のに in the syntactic layer, but adds a sense of disapproval (What's the difference between にしては、 わりに and くせに?) in the pragmatic layer. In other words, the nuance くせに has doesn't go against any particular word in this sentence. If I had to merge it into an English sentence, I'd choose to ...


4

だからこその調査任務。というわけで(冒険学部の長にコネを持つ)俺にも協力要請が飛んで来たのだ。 (って言っても、俺は雑用みたいなものだけど) In this context, 「雑用{ざつよう}」 would be synonymous to 「雑用係{ざつようがかり}」. "Even so, I'll be more like a handy-andy." To be completely honest, I have no idea how you get "expenses".


3

料金分{りょうきんぶん}はきっちり 仕事{しごと}させて貰{もら}いますから In this context, 「きっちり」 means "properly", "exactly", etc. 「料金分はきっちり」 literally means "exactly the fee's worth". My own TL: Literal: "I shall work for exactly the fee's worth." Free: "I'm going to work exactly as much as you are paying for."


1

兄さんが私の相手をするはずなんてないもの。 There is no way my brother would pay attention to me, you know. This is a combination of the following three grammar points: The はずがない sentence pattern Learn JLPT N4 Grammar はずがない なんて that replaces が/を/etc Learn JLPT N3 Grammar なんか・なんて・など もの as a sentence-end particle used to justify/explain something (often もん in informal ...


3

味合わない is just a common misspelling of 味わわない. Since 味わう is a regular consonant-stem verb, its nai-form is あじわわない and its causative-form is あじわわせる. 「味あわせる?」 「味わわせる?」 Q 「味あわせる」「味わわせる」のどちらが正しいのでしょうか。 A 文法的には「味わわせる」が正しいことになります。 However, some people type or pronounce it as あじあわない or あじあわせる instead, and IMEs that don't recognize this wrong spelling may ...


5

[都合の悪いところは破っておいた日記と一緒に持ち帰った]、小型デストロイヤーの足を見て判断したそうだ。 The "、" clearly shows that the whole 「都合の悪いところは破っておいた日記と一緒に持ち帰った」 is a long relative clause that modifies 小型デストロイヤーの足. "... the destroyer's foot, [which I brought back (from the quest) together with the journal...]" Without the 「、」: 都合の悪いところは破っておいた日記と一緒に持ち帰った小型デストロイヤーの足を見て判断したそうだ。 It can be ...


-1

From 新完全マスター N1 文法: 〜といったところだ is a grammar point that has a meaning of 程度は最高でも〜で、あまり高くない. It's used to show that the quantity of something isn't very much. 当地は夏もそれのほど暑くありません。最高に暑い日でも26、7どといったところです。 この山歩き会では毎月山歩きを行っていますが、参加者は毎回せいぜい6、7人といったところです。 From a dictionary of advanced Japanese grammar, p633: といったところだ is a phrase that the speaker uses to ...


3

都合の悪いところは破っておいた日記: a diary with undesirable parts trimmed と 一緒に持ち帰った…足: legs that she took home together with (the diary) 足を見て判断したそうだ: She said that she judged it from legs All in all, "She said that she judged it (how much the reward should be?) from legs of the mini-destroyers she took home together with the diary with undesirable parts trimmed".


2

This should be a variant of がつがつ or がっつり. The person in the video uses onomatopoeia uniquely, and you should not seriously worry about its literal meaning in this case. It's used merely as a vigorous-sounding onomatopoeia and the meaning of "greedy" is not important. パラライカ is also a meaningless 地口. ガッツリーナ in the latter half of the video is also in the same ...


5

Yes, when 半ば is used as an adverb, its nuance is often close to "almost" rather than 50%. Your translation seems fine. Other examples: もう半ば諦めています。 彼の本業は芸人だが、普段は半ば作家のような生活をしている。 彼の気持ちは半ば決まっていたが、それでも迷いがあった。


2

In addition to 撫でる and よしよしする (良し) there is いいこいいこする (from 良い子). Also, there is a variant of 撫でる which is 撫ぜる. From that is derived the word 撫ぜ撫ぜ(する) (not to be confused with the 何故-derived なぜなぜ, as in なぜなぜ分析). By the way, if the pet comes to you and rubs itself against you, that is すりすり.


2

A: でも好きな子ぐらいはいるんじゃないですか B: そういうのも含めて分かんなくなりました 誰も僕の話を聞いてくれなかったから You're close, but I'm going to break it down just a little bit, and see if I can help with this. I'll start with person A: でも- But 好きな子- A 'child' (subject) likes. As you have noted in your translation, they aren't talking about a child, but rather a girl, as this seems to be a ...


5

「西部{せいぶ}で一番人気{いちばんにんき}タイトルは日本へ!」 The two parts that native Japanese-speakers will instantly find unnatural-sounding are the word 「西部」 and the particle「は」. 「西部」 does not mean "the West" in the sense of the "Occident". It just means the western part of a town, region, country, etc. For the U.S., for instance, 「西部」 means states such as California. The ...


18

If the question "May I pet the dog?" means "May I stroke the dog gently?", then none of the phrases you obtained from your sources look good. 「可愛{かわい}がる」 is the closest if not very good. The other two 「飼{か}う」 and 「ペットにする」 are simply out of the question. My own recommendations as a Japanese-speaker would be: 「軽{かる}くなでてもいいですか。」 「ちょっとなでてもいいですか。」 ...


3

It's funny because my mother language is not English (or Japanese) and I remember being very confused when I encountered for the fist time the English verb "to pet". Because it's so imprecise ! Do you want to touch the dog ? Stroke the dog ? Play with the dog ? So it's the same in Japanese, "to pet" doesn't really exist, you just state what you actually ...


8

The みれば in 言ってみれば is a subsidiary verb (補助動詞), adding the meaning of "try ~~ing". 言ってみれば is the conditional form of 言ってみる. 言ってみる consists of the te-form of 言う + subsidiary verb みる, meaning "try saying". So 言ってみれば literally means "If I/you try saying..." → "If I may say so", "So to speak".


1

I think you often hear that as part of a ~てみれば construct, which would be the conditional form of ~てみる. In this case, the ~てみれば part alters the verb to mean If one tried to ~. Some phrases are rather common and feel like fixed expressions, such as 考えてみれば (if you think about it), which explains you can come across them quite often. An example stolen from ejje....


7

「これアカンやつやぞ何か言わんとハードルガンガン上がってくやつやぞー!」 To insert punctuations and the omitted particles if that helped you a little, it would look like: 「これはアカンやつやぞ!何か言わんとハードルがガンガン上がってくやつやぞー!」 To translate this Kansai speech into Standard Japanese, it would be: 「これはいけないやつだぞ!何か言わないとハードルがガンガン上がっていくやつだぞー!」 「あかん」 means "no good". The 「と」 in 「何かいわんと」 is a conditional ...


3

You seem to be almost there. Just a few things to point out. そんな謙遜ともとれる妹の態度(に) In order to be able to tell you exactly what the に at the end of your phrase is doing, we'd need the rest of the sentence. とれる can be translated into many words, but the closest meaning to the sentence (in my interpretation) would be: 1. to be interpreted as, and 2. ...


4

そんな modifies (妹の)態度, not 謙遜. 謙遜ともとれる is a relative clause that modifies (妹の)態度. As you know, とれる is the potential form of とる(取る), and you're right that the とれる here means "interpret", or "see/consider/take". (It's not the とる in 態度をとる in the sense of "to behave", though.) The と means "as", as in 「AをBととる」 "interpret/take/see/consider A as B". も means "also"...


17

To explain the phrase, it seems the phrase 'I can eat glass, it doesn't hurt me' was collected in a variety of languages by someone at Harvard University in the 1990s. https://web.archive.org/web/19990116232350/http://hcs.harvard.edu/~igp/glass.html "The Project is based on the idea that people in a foreign country have an irresistable urge to try to say ...


1

これは不良・ヤクザまがいの生活を経験しつつも日本の大学に進学して最終的にラッパーになった輪入道本人の半生の歌のようです(ソース)。なので恐らく、この「マガジン」とはマンガ・グラビア雑誌のマガジンのことだと思います。腹部にグラビア雑誌を巻いてパンチやナイフなどから防御するというのは以前に本当にあった話のようです。 https://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/qa/question_detail/q12149865107 これは、昭和期のヤクザ達がよく使った防御手段です。ジャンプのような再生紙ではなく、写真雑誌。(ツルツルした写真のページは密度が非常に高い) 写真のページが多い雑誌を、腹や胸に入れ、細いベルトかサラシで固定するわけです。 密度の高い写真系の雑誌は、...


7

The translation of Google Translate is almost fine, but ガラス is not a glass for drinking but glass as material. See this question. I don't think it's a well-known idiom, proverb, joke, cliche, etc. It's just a weird Japanese sentence that is grammatical but nonsensical. Anyway, how is this bug related to the meaning of the Japanese text?


7

落語は今から三百年以上前の江戸時代に始まりました。 Our story begins over 300 years in the edo period. You must have had a reason for using "our story", so I will not argue that. If I were you, however, I would use "rakugo" and start with "Rakugo started ~~~" in the past tense as in the original. この時代にたくさんの人の前で面白い話をして、お金をもらう人がいました。 In this time, in front of many people,...


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