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I am not 100% sure but it seems that they just confused vertical and horizontal lines and the correct kanji would be 傷 (wound, hurt, injury). In this case the translation would be something like "storm wound" \ "storm damage". Does it make sense to you?


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The prefix ご and the suffix 様{さま} are used in honorific speech, to speak in a respectful manner regarding someone or something. Here are some more examples of the usage of honorific prefixes. As naruto mentioned in the comments on your question, 本家{ほんけ} is the word that's being mentioned respectfully. Looking around on Twitter, the word is used in slang to ...


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決闘 is used for the one-time win/lose situation to be involved in the honor. It is especially used to refer the stage damage/being damaged in a direct way.(i.e. French mathematician Évariste Galois are believed to have dueled for his fiancée, Kojiro Sasaki and Musashi Miyamoto are believed to have dulled for their art of sword mastery in Ganryu island and so ...


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決闘 specifically refers to this tradition to protect one's honor, fought with rapiers, pistols or such. It usually ends with one of the participant's death. Basically this is something in the past (at least in developed countries), and you won't see this outside of wild-west movies or dramas set in the middle ages. This kind of dueling was mainly practiced in ...


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勝負 is a general term ranging in meaning from a game to a contest which includes such things as fights and contests to settle disputes (which is what a duel in English usually refers to). 決闘 is a particular kind of 勝負 that we generally translate as a duel.


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In some cases you can use なんとかなる to say 'everything will be fine', but なんとかする might be better when you want to convey that you are really committed to improve the situation. Literally なんとかなる means something like 'the situation will just take its course; things will go as they go'. It is in 3rd person, more neutral as such, and does not tell whether the ...


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As you may already know Japanese has a lot of peculiar nuances. In this case it's somewhat contextual. If you are out of reach of a box of tissue and you are asking someone to pass you a tissue then there is an implication that you would like a tissue. Therefore the sentence "ティッシュを取ってください" is more akin to "Can you pick up a tissue [for me]?&...


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In the most straightforward interpretation, いつも modifies the whole of 音楽を聴きながら勉強します, in which the adverbial clause 音楽を聴きながら modifies the main verb 勉強します. This is because いつも is an adverb of frequency, and this kind of adverb tends to work on the whole sentence. Thus, the sentence is talking about the frequency of your habit, and your habit in this case is to ...


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I also wonder why だ is used at the end. It quotes the phrase 「なるようになれ」 as a noun referring to the policy "let it be". So to complement a context, it kind of says: I'll bet on "let it be".


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"なる" = "to be" "ように" = "like" "なれ" = "Be" So it means something like "let it be" in a negative tone. He gets desperate.


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はーい is correct. You can add more dashes or use 〜 if you want, or you might spell it はぁい (or perhaps はあい), but ははい has an extra h-sound.


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In ビルさんは日本語は簡単だと言いました, Bill is the one who said “Japanese is easy.” The statement clause is 日本語は簡単だ. (By the way, 簡単だ is not a verb but an adjective.) Similarly, Mike is the one who doesn’t know who will come in マイクさんはだれが来るか知りません. The original clause だれが来る is a question because it contains a question word だれ. と is the only correct choice in the practice ...


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Don't worry, your translation is correct. Let's break it down one by one: Me(watashi) and my(to watashi no) girlfriend(kanojo) live in tokyo(wa tokyo ni sunde imasu). The reason you're repeating watashi twice is watashi and watashi no is entirely different. I know that it's not the best way to describe it, but it's not the same as saying she's my property(...


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The word "どことも知れぬ" means "No one knows where" or something like that. "どこででもある" is "can be anywhere". If I were to translate this, I would translate it to "This is a country of everywhere and nowhere". Does that make sense to you?


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かい is simply another version of the question particle か. You can read this post for details, but the main nuance is that you only use it when it's a yes and no question. You are correct for the meaning of てもらう and ため. The main subtlety here is that てもらう is used to request the ocean, not someone. The literal translation would be something like: "In ...


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キリ means gimlet. 型means "type" There are some type of screwdriver. Name is different on the shape. I don't know much about when getting stucked キリisn't 切り(cut)


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~ても means something like 'even if' or 'no matter'. Because the sentence pairs it within a question word, here we have 'no matter where one goes'. おまえのような ヒーローきどり is a whole noun phrase, ヒーローきどり itself being one noun. 'Wannabe heroes like you'. しゃしゃりでる essentially means to butt into things that don't concern you. から directly following a predicate means '...


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