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There are many cases where the Japanese "KURU/KIMASU" really means the same as the English "come", and the Japanese "IKU/IKIMASU" really means the same as the English "go", but there's a certain case where it's used differently. Let's look at the following 4 scenarios. This video explains with animations: I'll come or ...


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静かにさせてくれ literally means "(Please do me a favor and) let me be quiet", so "Let me have piece" is the closer translation. The implied を-marked agent of させる is 私 ("me"), although 私を/俺を/etc is almost always dropped in a sentence like this. ~させてくれ/~させてください is a common pattern. 行かせてくれ Allow me to go. 俺を笑わせてくれ Make me laugh.


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I believe 在る here is used not as part of the copula である but in the actual literal meaning of "to exist". This is partly hinted by the use of kanji instead of kana (though it is not a 100% indicator with manga). I.e. the meaning is roughly: "people tend to forget that they exist as humans" and not "people tend to forget that they're ...


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I am at beginner-intermediate level of Japanese, so please do not consider this as an Authoritative Answer having precedentiary value, it is completely based on inference derived by me however, in support I have presented my arguments in support of my answer. So, please correct me, if my reasoning is wrong. Thank you !! It is clear that でしょう when used with ...


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Although the words you listed are all semantically related, they each have quite distinct grammatical roles in the typical usage (with little overlapping) that you never want to miss. As function words: 自分/己 vs 自身/自ら vs 自己 (vs 自) 自分 is a standalone pronoun that substitutes the same referent (noun) that appears in the context. While it certainly can be ...


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This might not be the most complete answer, but I might be able to give a general picture for what they are used for. I'll give a summary of what I have read, mostly which comes from goo.ne. 自分 - This refers to the "self" in both the concrete and the abstract. For example 「自分の体」refers to your physical body. 「自分の考え」is also perfectly valid. 自分のことは、...


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Using 悪くならない for food is a stable choice that means "don't spoil". But just in case, it is not an exact replacement for 日持ち, as the word is a noun "capacity of lasting long" (no derived verb or adjective usage). What replaces 悪くならない as a whole is 日持ちが良い or 日持ち(が)する. 悪くならない保存料 would mean "preservative that doesn't let (food) spoil&...


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廉太郎さんに伝えられましたが、水曜日には面談がありますよね? 廉太郎さんに水曜日には面談があると伝えられましたが。 they prefer using a passive voice It's not that we prefer passive voice but the speaker being the subject of the sentence rather than the third party. (Animacy hierarchy) Anyway, it's true that those example sentences are natural in this regard. Is my correction (the second sentence) better? ...


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In most situations, including ordinary business exchanges, they are completely interchangeable. Maybe 半 is a bit more common in casual conversations simply because it's easier to pronounce, but saying 30分 is always safe. 30分 is preferred in formal written text and technical contexts where consistency and clarity is important, but I guess "half past 3&...


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I think you have already listed all of the common and not-so-common ones. あ い う ア イ ウ 一 二 三 イ ロ ハ (usually katakana) 甲 乙 丙 (explained here) 1 2 3 / A B C / a b c / I II III / i ii iii These letters are often enclosed in parentheses or circles. イロハ is still widely used in legal documents, dictionaries and such. It's at least much more common than 甲乙丙. You ...


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Unless you want a very strict analysis on the differences of the two, it seems to me that both mean almost the same thing when used to mean "let alone". もちろん is used more often in speech while もとより sounds more formal/stiff and can also be used in written texts/書き言葉. A simple google search of the difference seems to agree that the two are pretty ...


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