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1

You are over analyzing this sentence. You have mistakenly concluded that だけは is a special kind of grammatical construct. It is not. だけ is just a part of the topic of this sentence. The sentence then moves on to saying that the person in question doesn't understand said topic. In this case (only) themselves. Source: それでも彼には、自分のことだけはわからない。 Translation (...


15

「~~だけ + は + Verb + ない」 is the pattern you will need to learn as it is commonly used. It is an expression that describes the single or very few exceptions to a phenomenon. It means: "Someone [Verb] everything but/except ~~." Thus, 「それでも彼には、自分のことだけはわからない。」 means: "He, however, knows/understands everything but about himself." or "Things about ...


1

Because you are interpreting the English use of the word 'so' in your sentence literally as 'consequently', you are equating that to ので, but the result in your sentence doesn't follow the action/behavior. You can use だから in this sense, but ので doesn't really work this way. It is more logical. ので shows a natural or expected cause and effect behavior. 'I eat, ...


4

Both デマ and ガセ refer to false information (thus it's intangible), but the biggest difference is that デマ must be prevailing; it is always intended to be widely spread through rumors or SNS, and thousands (or millions) of people are affected. Fake news on Facebook is usually called デマ. See how the words like 噂, 流す, 扇動 are included only in the definition of デマ. ...


1

デマ is an abstract idea as you mentioned in the statement. ガセ is a concrete stuff which you can qrasp by your hands. so, you can say ガセネタを摑{つか}まされる。 I would not say デマを摑{つか}まされる。 ガセ is close to パチモン. デマ is not. See the link : コトバ解説 「デマ」と「ガセ」の違い


0

I'm not familiar with the manga, but this is likely a colloquial way of saying 「いいでしょう!」or 「いいよね!」. Please visit here for a little more background (assuming characters are speaking one of the northern dialects). Keep in mind, this is not a particle and not necessarily always sentence-ending either.


5

Clearly, Goo is lacking another set of definitions and it is a major one necessary to understand the present-day Japanese -- in particular, the less formal Japanese. That lacking set of definitions, in my own words, would be: just, only, no more than, etc. used for placing limits or boundaries on the piece of information or word at hand. With the above ...


0

In the japanese dictionary, あくまでも have two "opposite" meaning. https://www.weblio.jp/content/%E3%81%82%E3%81%8F%E3%81%BE%E3%81%A7 Simply, 1st meaning: the range is infinite. 2nd meaning: the range is finite. Your interpretation looks correct. Because it can be thought 2nd meaning changes in the context. "だいたい、自殺と事故など~", あくまで means the range who know the ...


6

The English word 'some' is pretty versatile and can be attached to many other words. In Japanese, what tends to happen is that 'some' gets translated differently according to what kind of things you are talking about. Here are some examples (pun intended): 誰か somebody 何か something どこか somewhere いつか some day / some time いくつか some items いくらか some ...


5

You can use 単品【たんぴん】. Perhaps this is the only word you would need in this situation. チーズバーガー、単品で。 単品のチーズバーガーを2つ。


4

Both are grammatical, and it's a matter of preference to a certain degree. Generally speaking, が/を at the end of an embedded question before a verb is usually omitted unless you want to emphasize the embedded question. リンゴマークがあるか(を)確認します。 彼女がどこにいるか(が)分かりません。 ハートマークではなくリンゴマークがあるかを確認してください。 どうやるのかではなく、なぜやるのかが分かりません。 What I don't understand is why ...


5

The sentence-ending か expresses indefiniteness, incertitude, etc. It is pretty much synonymous to a question mark. 「日韓外相、タイで会談」 without the 「か」 means that it is definite that the Japanese and Korean foreign ministers will meet for talks in Thailand. 「日韓外相、タイで会談か」 with the 「か」 means that the meeting is indefinite. It is not official yet even ...


3

つい doesn't necessarily stand for habit but that you do something unintentionally. がち stands for tendency and means that something is expected to happen to some extent frequently, whether it's intentional or unintentional.


6

The sentence is コーヒーいれようか Shall I make some coffee? (入れ-る or 淹れ-る can be used according to your taste) 「いれ」 part is pronounced weak in the original audio, which would explain why you heard it as 「で」.


4

"入門者向け" is used when you should be instructed by teacher , instructor, person who can teach properly. "初心者向け" can be used by when you have just started to practice sports, video games, etc. When you use it, you do not need a person who certify your level of sports, video games, etc. "初級者向け" is used when the level of something already set, such as books of ...


0

I don't think a single word would work for you in both cases, as they're different contexts. The different colors implies a variety of colors is what's pretty, not a color that's not the same as the current one. They have a different dog isn't implying a variety of dogs, but a dog that isn't the same as the current one. So, I think for the "different ...


3

別{べつ}(の) sounds like what you are looking for. It's a common word meaning "different", "distinct", "separate", and works well in a lot of situations. 別の道{みち}を探{さが}そう。 Let's look for a different path. 彼は酔{よ}っ払う{ぱらう}とまるで別人{べつじん}になる。 He turns into a completely different man when he's drunk. それとも別の味{あじ}がいいの? Or would you prefer a different ...


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