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3

I'm not an expert in labor categorization, but as a layperson, I'd translate 技術・研究 as "Technology/Research" and it would include researchers, engineers, analysts etc. I'd translate 生産・技能 as "Manufacturing/Skilled-work", and it could indeed include broad occupations like skilled agricultural, forestry and fishery workers, Crafts and related trades workers, ...


1

From https://business-textbooks.com/gizyustu-ginou/ ...すなわち、「技術」は知識を指し、「技能」は能力を指すという分け方です。 To provide a rough distinction and my rough interpretations (in English) of source material (in Japanese) from above link: 技術 refers to "knowledge" of how to use something discovered by science/engineering that enables or empowers. 「技術」にはまた、「科学によって生まれた成果を、...


2

「箆深{のぶか}く射{さ}された矢{や}がなかった。」 「箆{の}」, in this context, means a "bamboo arrow shaft". There is indeed a 「竹」 ("bamboo") radical used at the top of the kanji. 「箆深{のぶか}し」 is an adjective which 大辞林 defines as: 矢が根元{ねもと}まで深くささっている。 "(of an arrow) stuck through (an object)" 「箆深く」 is the 連用形 of 「箆深し」 functioning adverbially.  The arrow was not there to ...


1

In my opinion, it should be 下手で当然だろ? (It's natural that I'm poor at it, isn't it?) , which can barely be interchangeable to 下手なはずだろ?, but not はずだよ. Neither わけだ or はずだ are really correct because わけだ (No wonder that's that) can only work when you provide information the listener isn't aware of or when you hear the reason you haven't been aware of, and はずだ is ...


3

Regarding this ~とては, I initially thought this was a typo, but this seems to be a valid construction taken from an archaic grammar pattern, meaning "Speaking of ~" or something. See @goldbrick's comment. Usually ~としては ("As for ~", "As ~", "From ~'s standpoint", "As far as ~ is concerned") is used in modern standard Japanese. ~があるばかりだ is "there is only ~" or "...


3

In general, if you want to be sure of the correct kana spelling for a Japanese name, your best bet is to find out what kanji it's typically spelled with, and then find the matching readings for those kanji. In this case, looking up "Shinya" (as a surname), it appears to be most commonly spelled either 新谷 or 新屋. For both of those, the kana spelling would be ...


2

Without context, "shinya" would be represented as しにゃ. However, AFAIK there is no name with such spelling so with 99% probability it is しんや. To avoid ambiguity, it is recommended to put an apostrophe between n representing ん and following vowels (i.e. "Shin'ya").


3

悪夢から一夜明け、アインのもとで訓練を重ねる日々が始まった。 The から is a 助詞(particle), meaning "after~" (or "from~" "since~"). (The plural suffix ら should be attached to a noun or pronoun.) Is the reason the dictionary claims のもとで/もと is a noun I don't think they claim のもとで is a noun. They're saying もと (下) is a noun, and that ~のもとで can be used to mean "under~~". I think you could ...


12

「私は日本語を勉強したい理由」 This is a nice try, but the 「は」 needs to be replaced by a 「が」. 「は」 is not an option here. Why not? That is because 「私が日本語を勉強したい」 is a relative clause that modifies 「理由」, correct? Inside if-clauses and relative clauses, the subject/topic marker is always 「が」. We say: 「ジョーンズさんが買った車はBMWです。」 「あなたが日本に行くなら、私もいっしょに行きたい。」 The 「が」 in either ...


2

To me, 日本晴れ (usually read にほんばれ rather than にっぽんばれ) is nothing more than a catchy recurring phrase heard in lyrics, titles or such. It refers to a beautiful clear sky, but I have never wondered or sought its meaning deeper than that. I was aware of no particular connection between 日本晴れ and soccer prior to this. Of course it's never used in serious ...


-1

どこが病院ですか contains something called exhaustive-listing が. This type of が is used to identify something from multiple possibilities. 私は英語を話せます。 I can speak English. 私が英語を話せます。 I can speak English. (with emphasis on "I", as a response to "Who can speak English?") It's me who can speak English. ここは病院です。 This is a hospital. ここが病院です。 This is the hospital (we were ...


1

In your case, simple verbs like 語る and 話す should work because the poem is just a part of his story. Or you can avoid any verb corresponding to "tell" and say something like 彼の話は詩から始まりました. (詩で物語を始める is a little puzzling.) You may not need them, but verbs commonly used with verse/poetry include: 語る (this can refer to dramatic storytelling like that of a ...


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