New answers tagged

0

I think you have the grammar right, what might have escaped you is that つかれた is not an adjective like "tired" is in English (ex: He is tired.) . When you realize that it's a past tense of a verb and you have to treat it like 食べる・食べた, everything will make sense to you. You'd say, 食べました but not 食べたです。 To repeat everyone here, 「です」applies only to ...


1

You are correct, go with (b). 出たら would be "When you attend" 出るのなら would be "If you plan to attend" so, the latter is a better fit for "You better study ahead."


1

The second sentence (b) sounds natural, whereas the first (a) doesn’t, at least not for what you wanted it to mean. It would mean you would do 予習 at the class, which would be too late if it refers to preparations for that class.


1

As stated above, your use of である, up to that point, is okay. The problem lies with the rest. I'd rephrease as: お金持ちであるだけでは、幸せにはなれない。 Being rich by itself, won't make you happy. To answer your question, as to why it's wrong, I'll try to show where you've gone off the rails by showing you the literal translation of what you got. お金持ちであることは幸せな人生を送るわけではない。 The ...


2

The particle は adds sort of exclusivity in a negative sentence. For example, ビールは[飲]{の}まない。 implies this person might drink other alcoholic drinks, but not beer. ビール is singled out to stress that he doesn’t drink beer. On the other hand, ビールを[飲]{の}まない。 has no such implication. When it’s a verb that is to be singled out, it takes the following form: [V ...


5

In Japanese, it's perfectly fine to use この/そんな/あの/etc to modify 私/武蔵/etc., but it has a certain nuance. こんな私: a person like me (lit. "such I") この俺: a person like me / even I / me here / no one else but me この武蔵: I, Musashi / This person Musashi See this question for other possible translations. In your example, saying この武蔵 probably implies this ...


0

EDIT: Now that it's clearer that you're asking about the 選べ rather than the 来れば, ignore the next paragraph and skip to the end. While え-form can indeed imply imperative, if it's ~えば then that's a provisional ("if") form, i.e. it means "If you came to my place ..." and in this context it's probably been contracted from 来ればいい, which is used ...


4

礼楽 is a fairly uncommon word. It's not very nice to use such a difficult word to explain the meaning of an easy word... Anyway, here its meaning is more of "ritual/ceremony and music" rather than "ritual music". So it's one of the compounds that just mean "A and B", such as 男女, 天地, 山河, 妻子, 文武 and 見聞. Music played by a 堂 doesn't ...


1

I believe the expression 「職員室に叩き出される」 here is a variation on (or at least the 「出される」part is influenced by) the more common「職員室に呼び出される」 ("to be called into the staffroom"). Students may 職員室に呼び出される for various reasons, both good and bad, but more often than not it spells trouble for them. The meaning of the 「叩き出される」 in this case would be much the ...


0

I don't see that anyone has mentioned it, but exclusively either たち or ら are permitted for certain pronouns. For example: 彼ら ✅ | 彼たち ✕ See the Wikipedia article on Japanese pronouns for more info


3

This should just mean "thrown/kicked into the teachers' room". Assuming the speaker is a student, he said this because the teachers' room is psychologically an unfamiliar "outside" place to the students. Of course something like 職員室に放り込まれるぞ is equally correct, but we somehow don't say 職員室に叩き入れる. EDIT: "Outside" may not have been ...


Top 50 recent answers are included