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0

Welcome to the site! Great to see the community expanding! I am also a newcomer, so apologies if I am wrong, but on this site you may want to be careful about using the word "research" too lightly (not saying that you did, but just in case...) What I can say is that while 酒によっている (=being drunk) was the only example with a "によって” that you gave, "Xによると" and "...


5

As others have said, the answer is no. However, you could leave the subject off the end of the sentence if it's well understood within the sentence context. × わたしの(です)。 → No context ○ A: 誰の本ですか?    B: わたしの(です) → It's understood that the book is the subject


4

The short answer is no. While you can leave off the subject of a sentence if it is understood, the same cannot be done this grammatical structure. の is a particle that is formed by the following structures Noun の Noun (watashi no hon) or Noun (particle) の Noun (Amerika kara no hon). Often, you will see it in connection with noun phrases, which ...


9

Nope. One minor exception would be “finishing someone else’s sentence”, like 「やったのは誰?太郎?」 「…の弟、ね」 “ Who did it? Taro?” “...’s little brother, actually.” But this is really only possible when the last word of the person you are speaking to is the head of your sentence. It feels less like a grammatical thing and more like a conversational trick.


8

I would say 「~~でできている」, as in: この腕時計は、[金]{きん}でできている。 The wristwatch is made out of gold. この家は、木でできている。 This house is made of wood. 女の子は何でできているの? ♪What are little girls made of?


1

連絡がなくて、みんな心配していました。- "There hasn't been any contact (from someone) and everyone worried" 連絡がないので、みんな心配していました。- "Because there hasn't been any contact (from someone), everyone worried" 連絡がないから、みんな心配していました。- "Because there hasn't been any contact (from someone), everyone worried" The so-called "て-form" can be seen as a kind of adverbial form which makes a ...


0

While in English the word "gold" can easily mean both the colour and the metal, the Japanese word for "golden colour" is "金色" and the word for gold (metal) is "金" (read as きん), which makes it less ambiguous. Although there is also word "黄金" which indeed can mean both the colour and the metal, and "金" read as "かね", which can mean "money" or "metal" in ...


1

So, a small note first of all, I don't think that 〜と教える is all that common? Usually it does take を from what I've seen, though と is not ungrammatical. In any case, there is definitely a difference in meaning between と言う and を教える・と教える even if they can both be translated to "tell". When you say/see 〜と言った・と言いました, there is a sense that you are quoting what was ...


-1

Basically the same, but 招待 is more formal and is better for "abstract" invitations (I mean, if 誘う is good for "come here", 招待 can imply a more common "recommendation". Also if e.g. talking about some (elitistic) club accepting new members only based on invitations, 招待 would be the choice when referring to a member inviting someone to join). In addition, 招待 ...


-1

Normally one would use もらいました (as long as you are talking to some 3rd (in this case literally 4th) party not so closely associated with the boss). (Actually, at least for people below their 50s, when telling a friend that you (yourself) have received something from your boss, if having to choose between the 2, I think もらいました would be more common, although ...


-1

Your understanding is correct. The only reason your sentence doesn't sound natural is small grammatical inconsistencies. You can say お金持ちであることが幸せな人生を意味するわけではない or お金持ちであることが幸せな人生を呼び寄せるわけではない. I.e. お金持ちであること is the state of being rich, and a state cannot do 人生を送る. However, it can imply things/cause things etc. and thus the examples work. You can also ...


3

No, it would be weird to refer to your own party as お客様 as it implies it is your customer in that context (so only the waitstaff would use it). Generally, you don't use 尊敬語 to your "own side". That said if you need to honor the person (e.g. it is your client), then I would use こちらの方.


1

They are criticizing, or find it funny that it is 懐中電灯なくても全然暗くない. It's a bit like writing *shrug*. Similar examples include: よりによって今壊れるっていう Out of all possible times, it chooses to break at this very moment *shrug* . お前は誰やねんっていう(笑) I was like, who the hell are you lol It's an invitation to agree to/sympathize with the speaker. Grammatically ...


3

Originally it just means "to lie down" or "to sleep". This you can see e.g. based on an example sentence given for one of the definitions for「横」on『新明解国語辞典第五版』: よこ【横】 水平の方向(の長さ)。 「―になる〔=寝る(時と同じ姿勢をとる)〕」 and on『明鏡国語辞典第二版』: よこ【横】 ❺ 物の置かれた形が、水平に長く伸びていること。 「ソファーで━になる」 In this context「横」should then be interpreted as an antonym to「縦」, i.e. as ...


1

I watched the video of the short speech and Shigeru Miyamoto definitely says 作り始めましょう、っていうことになったんですけど... First off, it doesn't matter if there's a period or a comma. Like in English, the meaning stays the same ("I accept it. However..." / "I accept it, however"). Then - like you've already demonstrated with 対談 - ことになった means "it was decided". So what ...


4

はい、「曲がり具合に」と「沿って」が対応し、「そのまま」と「伸ばして」が対応しています。 なので、「曲がり具合に沿って」がなくても文法的には問題ありません。しかし意味は曖昧になってしまいます。「そのまま伸ばしていく」だけでは、直線的に延長するのか曲線として延長するのか不明瞭だからです。


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