New answers tagged

1

To answer your main question directly: Yes, 精度 (seido) can be used to mean "accuracy" or "precision" in most contexts. Nevertheless, in certain contexts, where "accuracy" and "precision" are distinguished (e.g. scientific), there may be better-defined words (e.g. 正確 (seikaku) for "accuracy", 精密 (seimitsu) for ...


1

Which person does it refer to here, the scammer or Kenya? Your reasoning seems correct to me. 性質の悪い means "evil-minded" or "malignant" rather than "stupid", so it refers to the scammer. This aligns with what B said after this. If this たちの悪いやつ referred to Kenya, B would have responded like "そうですよ!ケンヤは本当に間抜けで!" or "...


1

The phrase you are using, to say that someone is "your person", is essentially an expression in English. Expressions can be difficult to translate directly between languages. I might take a direct approach and say 私には彼女だ which literally says, "For me, it is her". But that doesn't really make sense. You could expand that a little and say ...


0

I don't know that I would consider this an answer so much as a reflection and suggestion about how to approach this idea in Japanese. (If the moderators feel this is unsuitable as an answer, then please let me know, I will remove it.) As I mentioned in a comment to your post, "to be someone's person" is a highly idiomatic phrase made popular to ...


7

はじめて usually means "for the first time". However, when you use the ~してはじめて construction, the nuance of this はじめて is closer to "at last" or "finally" rather than "for the first time". Compare the following sentences: 京都に行って、はじめて本物の仏像を見た。 I went to Kyoto, and saw a real Buddha statue for the first time. ...


-1

I often heard this particle used in the Yakuza games where lots of Yakuza characters would use the ぞ/ぜ ending particle to to indicate dominance, masculine and pretty much what Derek Schaab said. Thus, it is recommended to not used it so casually, even if some Japanese relative is a friend. Unless , of course, you're both into role playing tough guys and ...


6

いかない is the negative-form of 行く, and いけない is the negative-potential-form of 行く. Both have a number of special usages when written in hiragana. Here, ~とはいかない means "won't go like ~", and it's a way to say something won't go/proceed/happen as expected. This と is a quotative-like-と, and this は is a topic/contrast marker. とはいかない and てはいけない are ...


3

「日本語を話してないときはDiscordでともだちと話している」 is already a fairly good sentence. (Perhaps you could've said 別のフレンドと, but this is not a big mistake.) You don't need to use たら/なら/ば. Your English version doesn't have "if", after all.


2

笑え is the imperative form of 笑う, so literally, it's not "I laugh at my dream" but "Laugh at this dream I had (until now)!". It doesn't make much sense for him to tell Karen to laugh at himself in this context, so I think he's saying this to no one in particular (or, to the listeners of this song). He's describing how silly and laughable ...


5

The Japanese pronoun choice is quite context-dependent, but I can confidently pinpoint that this おまえ is "a way to address a junior family member". In this sense, it has no particularly masculine or feminine connotation, and is rather regarded as a conservative (or old-fashioned) usage in the present day (the younger generation is less likely to use ...


4

Yes, the original message in Japanese is "はあちゃま and 赤井はあと". Someone who knows nothing about them would think she's presenting the names of two different people. Grammatically, the English translation is an error. Practically, it may not be an error if these two names refer to the same character. It may even be a good translation if saying "and&...


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