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1

Flexibility in Japanese written forms Written Japanese has two layers to it -- the words as pronounced, and the words as written. This double-layering allows authors to play around with nuance in ways that just aren't possible in other languages, like 月光【ムーンライト】 or 巾着【さいふ】 or 紅葉【はっぱのはなび】. 熄【や】み in specific Your example isn't quite as much of a stretch, ...


3

First of all, please keep in mind that the entire lyrics are made of sarcasm rather than pun. Everything in the brackets is what this "Mona Lisa The Otsubone" says. They are superficially compliments but are actually complaints. (In case you've missed the implication of お局, please read the link.) A song full of black jokes like this is certainly not a "kid's ...


9

It is from the verb 「通{とお}す」. 「Verb in 連用形{れんようけい} (continuative form) + 通す」 means: "to continue [verb]-ing to the end" In 「しどおし」, the first 「し」 is the 連用形 of the verb 「する」. 「どおし」is the 連用形 of 「通す」. The と-to-ど change is rendaku. Thus, 「どおし」 has nothing to do with「同士」 -- none. 「通す」 is written 「とおす」 in kana, not 「とうす」. My TL of the line: "Even ...


3

ぬか is an old-fashioned reading of 額, which is commonly ひたい today. That information is pretty easy to find if you type in both 額 and ぬか in a search engine. At the bottom I believe you're talking about 当て字(ateji), but that is not relevant to the 額 question.


2

夢に触れる is not a common expression and it's almost impossible to determine the author's intended meaning without referring to the entire context. From the context, I think the line roughly means "To what extent are you conscious of your (own) dream", "How much are you thinking (or doing) to realize your dream", or something along these lines. Perhaps just ...


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