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1

It's just a Typo. I am not sure about what you are asking, but 出会ってしまい… means the story goes on, but the sentence omits the rest part after the two characters meet. In this case the conjunction form is used since the following part is just omitted.


4

For yes-no type questions: 食べたの? 食べたんだ? Sentence 1 is very common, and sounds friendly and neutral (i.e., you have no prior assumption). Syntactically, sentence 2 may not be a question, but with a question mark, it sounds more like a confirmation with a surprised and/or accusatory tone ("So...you ate it, is that right?"). For wh-type questions (...


1

You are talking about some action that is taking place in the 図書館, so you have to use で. 図書館で本を読んでいます。 Particles: に vs. で There is a subsidiary verb いる used to express progressive "-ing", but it doesn't interfere with this rule.


1

This し simply means “and”. It means “Interpreter job can widen your view and make you grow.” や can’t replace し in this sentence because や can’t be after a verb or adjective. And し can’t be after a noun. Sometimes し means から(because). 今日は寒いし、外出はしたくない。 I don’t want to go out today because it’s clod. When し is used as から(because) like the example above,...


4

Um, you know about Japanese relative clauses, right? If not, I have to say this novel is too difficult for you yet. When you see a verb before a noun, it usually means there is a relative clause involved, although there are a few exceptions. The main clause of this sentence is: 言葉が出てこない。 Words will not come out. (i.e., I'm at a loss for words.) This ...


3

So, first of all, the sentence (私は)月曜日にいつも兄と一緒に食べます。 is grammatically totally fine and would be comprehended in the context you give. This would probably best structurally translate as "I usually/always eat with my brother on Mondays" However, partly because Japanese is a pronoun-drop language, and partly because of the situation -- where the speaker ...


0

I'm not familiar with the manga, but this is likely a colloquial way of saying 「いいでしょう!」or 「いいよね!」. Please visit here for a little more background (assuming characters are speaking one of the northern dialects). Keep in mind, this is not a particle and not necessarily always sentence-ending either.


5

It would be best to denote the house as both the location (of the rooms) and the topic of the sentence by using both. 「私{わたし}の家{いえ}には部屋{へや}が三{みっ}つあります。」 In my house [←topic], there are three rooms.' Colloquially: 'There are three rooms in my house.'


5

を/が are only indirectly connected to で/に. The problem is compounded by the fact that に and で both have multiple uses. で is used for instruments (I was eating with a fork, I came by bus, I spoke in English) で is used for locations of actions (I am eating at a restaurant, I am running in the park) に is used as a recipient (I gave the dog to Moa) に is used as ...


5

The sentence-ending か expresses indefiniteness, incertitude, etc. It is pretty much synonymous to a question mark. 「日韓外相、タイで会談」 without the 「か」 means that it is definite that the Japanese and Korean foreign ministers will meet for talks in Thailand. 「日韓外相、タイで会談か」 with the 「か」 means that the meeting is indefinite. It is not official yet even ...


2

This 乗り切る is not "to overcome", but a simple combination of 乗る + 切る, "(for power/force/etc) to be put/applied/loaded" + "completely/fully". 荷重が乗り切ってから is "after his weight was fully put onto the punch". It can be rephrased as 荷重を乗せ切ってから ("after loading/putting his weight fully onto the punch").


0

What constitutes a “word” is very different depending on different contexts. For example, studies based on intonation show that most English speakers consider “high school” to be a single word, despite it being written as two in the orthography. In English splitting words is usually done based on the spelling, which makes the problem a lot easier. In ...


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