New answers tagged

0

彼{かれ}はオフィスで働いています{はたらいています}。 In this sentence, the bolded part splits into two pieces: 「働いて{はたらいて}」(て-form of the verb 働く{はたらく}) 「います」(ます-form of the verb いる) The て-form of a verb has many uses, and in this case can be thought of as applying a progressive aspect to the verb 働く (similar to "-ing" in English). The grammar construction of 「て-form」+「いる・います」...


3

For the nuance of ともすると, please see this. This is a very old fixed phrase, and basically you should remember it without analyzing it too much. But according to the link, this と means "like this/that", and も is "even", so it literally means something like "if things go even like this". かとも is, yes, か ("may", "can it be") + と (quotative) + も ("even"). So ~...


4

The answer in the linked question basically applies here as well except that what comes before ほど does not have to be a noun for the sentence to mean "No C is as B as A." It can also be the attributive form (連体形) of a verb. But you can make your sentence structurally the same as the ones in that answer by nominalizing the verb with こと: ...


4

「すらさえも」 is only a highly emphatic form of: ・「すら(も)」 or ・「さえ(も)」 Combining the two does not produce a "new" meaning of its own. You should, therefore, just think of it as an emphatic way of saying "even" in English. "Even the lolicon bastard who (had) kidnapped a kid kept making fun of me, too." The original sentence is in the passive-voice form while ...


3

Regarding this ~とては, I initially thought this was a typo, but this seems to be a valid construction taken from an archaic grammar pattern, meaning "Speaking of ~" or something. See @goldbrick's comment. Usually ~としては ("As for ~", "As ~", "From ~'s standpoint", "As far as ~ is concerned") is used in modern standard Japanese. ~があるばかりだ is "there is only ~" or "...


1

In Okinawan, what is the ン in ウチナーンチュ? User ithisa conjectured that this ン is from ぬ, from の. Let's explore. Standard Japanese 日本人【にほんじん】 doesn't seem to have an equivalent [to Okinawan ン]. You're correct, but note that the Japanese on'yomi term 日本人【にほんじん】 follows Chinese grammar, where "a person from XYZ place" can be expressed as [PLACE] + person. ...


3

Unlike English "also", the particle も can be used when there is no explicit "similar" thing specified in the context. In such cases, も is closer to "even". Either way, the basic rule is も replaces を (and が, は). 笑っている人もいた。 There are even laughing people. 天才もミスをする。 Even a genius makes mistakes. 時が経つのを忘れた。 I forgot about the (passage of) time. ...


2

This まで (no. 4) is what is being used here. In English, this would be translated in most cases as "even". と just is quoting what is 言われる. Without context, therefore, I would translate your phrase roughly as: The story of the gamer(s) (ゲーマーの話) (against whom) people even go so far as (まで) to say (言われる) that winning is impossible (勝つことは不可能と)" As far ...


3

However I initially understood it as: "Most of them are experts in using magic" I don't think you are wrong. Actually you got the gist except the actual sentence technically doesn't say so. 大抵 is basically a quantifier today whose core meaning is "most times/cases (of)" instead of "most part" or "most people". But when you catch any random guy and ask them ...


0

To the people who are also interested in this "disambiguation"... While I am still not a 100% sure I think I can now explain why in: 「大抵は魔法使いの エキスパートで―…」「大抵」was translated as "In general..." If we consider the defnition: たい‐てい【大抵】 の解説 [名] 1 事柄の主要な部分。「事の大抵を知る」 2 事柄のあらまし。だいたいのようす。また、全体のうちの大部分。おおよそ。おおかた (https://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/word/%E3%81%9F%E3%81%...


4

Simply, it is な used as part of a na-adjective. Without a comma, do the following sentences make sense to you? あなたは寿司が嫌いなようだ。 You seem to hate sushi. 試験は簡単なようですね。 Looks like the exam is easy. If yes, the な in question is exactly the same. Of course, normally, no comma is placed before な, but since this 嫌い is modified by a relatively long adverbial ...


3

The が here is kind of a softener/bridge/segue to the actual relevant clause which follows the first. Oftentimes this is conflated with が meaning 'but', however it is not always appropriate to translate it thus. You will see this use of が quite often in sentences such as すみませんが、トイレはありますか? 'Excuse me, is there a restroom (here)?'. This site describes it as an '...


Top 50 recent answers are included