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1

I might have incomplete knowledge of slang or dialects or something, but I'm very confident this is a typo. As mentioned in comments, it looks like it should be “何食べたら大きくなれるの”, meaning roughly "what should I eat to get big(ger)?" I've been living in Japan for a while, and I've never heard a construction like the one you posted, without な. れる by ...


0

These can be parsed as: [すべて見る]目, relative clause + noun [すべてを見る]目, same thing, but this time すべて is treated as a noun [すべての][見る目], is a bit more interesting because now 見る目 is treated as a noun phrase modified by another noun Translating the third one into English gives a very awkward phrase, but it might be more natural-sounding in Japanese.


2

I believe I figured out my confusion. Because watashi was omitted in the previous sentences I learned, I thought desu filled in the gap because I misunderstood what it meant in TyCobb desu.. The textbook automatically omitted Watashi wa so I thought desu referred to I in certain situations/contexts. Upon further research, it is to be, is/am or used to end a ...


2

AからBへ and AからBまで are treated as one set, and only one の is necessary. I think this is an exception you need to remember. (I have mentioned this in this answer.)


1

I think you misunderstood it. I do believe that たかだ is a name (maybe the patissiere's name or perhaps it is a type of parfaits since google search seems to suggest that) hard to say without context. The sentence can be parsed as: "目の前に たかだパフェ 置かれただけ" Which means: in front of you( or him/her) only a takada parfait was placed


3

Your translation (in the comment) seems fine. The comma after 十キロメートル is used to rephrase or explain the word before it. In English, this use of commas is known as "parenthetical comma", but in Japanese, we often use a single comma. You can replace this use of comma with actual parentheses like so: 基部フロアの直径はおよそ十キロメートル(世田谷区がすっぽり入ってしまうほど)もあったという。 ...


3

両方 is fine, 両方は sounds unnatural. I'd say 両方とも is about the most natural. どっちにも and どっちも are both fine. EDIT: 私は仕事があるんで、 私は今日は仕事がありません。 Why can 「に」be omitted here? You can add に here, but then it emphasizes that YOU have work but others have not. Depending on the context it might even sound accusing. For example: 「どうせ誰が落としたんだか分からないんだから、この財布いただきましょうよ」 「...


3

As you said, this で is "at" (at a place). 日之出ん家で means "at Hinode's house". ~ばいいのに has the other meaning, which is a suggestion such as "why don't you ~". This する in the manga means "take a poop". So it means "Why don't you take a poop at (the bathroom of) Hinode's house?"


2

I'm a Japanese native, and 「道が混んでいて、バスが駅に着くまでとても時間がかかった」 would sound natural to me. If I had to compare the two: 道が混んでいて、バスが駅に着くまでとても時間がかかった 道が混んでいて、バスが駅に着くまでにとても時間がかかった I think the former sets the mental time to the moment the bus arrived, while the latter sets that moment in the past. I don't think it makes any significant semantic difference with this ...


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