New answers tagged

4

Well, generally every language has some quirks in its grammar, but as for your examples, を is the only option and に is never used. I sense from your statement "I would've thought に would be used in place, but instead を is used" that you may think or be taught that case particles each represent some kind of "universal" trait, but they are actually decided by ...


1

I read that に is used for indicating places of existence, target recipient [of something], the occasion, or the source of receiving an item. (There may be some I have missed.) I also read that を is for objects of a transitive verb (meaning a verb that needs something to receive the action it indicates). If I remember or know correctly, の is used before a ...


4

Here's the breakdown: ほっぽる: a colloquial godan verb that in this context means "to leave (alone)" ほっぽって: the te-form of ほっぽる ほっぽっておく: the te-form followed by the subsidiary verb おく, which means "to do something for the time being" here. See this question or this article. ほっぽっとく: the contracted form of ほっぽっておく. See this answer. ほっぽっといても: the temo-form of ...


2

You already seem to vaguely understand the difference, but to summarize: noun + ~を聞く = I hear [noun]: You hear a sound/music/story/etc. 窓が割れるのを聞いた means your heard the cracking noise. clause + ~と聞く = I hear that [clause]: You hear some fact (via conversations/news/etc). 窓が割れたと聞いた means you heard the news from someone but did not hear the noise itself. In ...


5

Yes, this い is the same as い as in だい or がい. From 明鏡国語辞典 第二版: い 終助 ① 《質問の文の後に付いて》くだけた調子で、親しみの意をこめる。 「これは何じゃい」「もう少し待ってみるかい?」 ② 《肯定や命令の文の後に付いて》意味を強める。 「早くしろい」「いやだい、ぼくがやるんだい」 【語法】 助動詞「だ」「じゃ」などに付いた「だい」「じゃい」、終助詞「か」「わ」「な」に付いた「かい」「わい」「ない」、動詞の命令形に付いた「ろい」などの形で使う。 In modern Japanese, Definition ② (non-questioning sentence-end い, such as ...


0

Your understanding is correct. The words 「から」 and 「ので」  effectively function like particles.


5

「~~だろうが」 is an accusatory sentence-ender used primarily by male speakers. The 「が」 is a particle. 「がい」, though not too common, is an emphatic and tougher-sounding version of that 「が」. Likewise, for emphasis, 「か」 for questioning becomes 「かい」 and 「だ」 for affirmation or declaration becomes 「だい」. Though 「かい」 and 「だい」 are far more common than 「がい」, I do not ...


Top 50 recent answers are included