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2

にて is simply a formal way of saying で (as in the particle for location or means). It's common in announcements and official documents. I don't know its linguistic history, but if you search the web you can occasionally see the name of this song translated as "In Zanarkand" or "At Zanarkand", which is more literally. I think "To Zanarkand" just sounds more ...


1

There are good answers here, but I'll provide my parsing as well. I take the sentence and peel back the layers: 人がいない場合でも水が流れることがあります。 So then, adding some parentheses to group clauses: (人がいない場合でも水が流れる)ことがあります。 ([人がいない場合]でも[水が流れる])ことがあります。 We can translate ことがあります。 loosely as "the condition exists." or "the event exists." Putting this aside for ...


3

I would structurally translate this as: 人がいない場合でも水が流れることがあります。 There are times when the water will flow, even if it is the case where there is nobody (here). The N+でも construction expresses the same as Vて+も, なadj+でも いadj+くても, which indicates a 'reverse condition', usually translated to "even if" - i.e. explaining a scenario which is contrary to ...


3

でも means "even if/even though/but".It is contrastive, and it's the version of いadj + くても used with nouns and なadj: 寒【さむ】くても、ジャケットを着【き】ないででかけた。Even though it was cold, I left without wearing a jacket. 昨日【きのう】暇【ひま】でも、宿題しなかった。Even though I was free, I didn't do homework yesterday. So your sentence would mean "water flowing may exist even in the case ...


0

/group 1-1 / (-aる,-uる,-oる→て) 止まる(tomaru)+しまう=止まってしまう 売る(uru)+しまう=売ってしまう 取る(toru)+しまう=取ってしまう /group 1-2/ (-iる,-eる→て or って) 着る(kiru)+しまう=着てしまう 経る(heru)+しまう=経てしまう 止める(tomeru)+しまう=止めてしまう 切る(kiru)+しまう=切ってしまう 減る(heru)+しまう=減ってしまう /group 2/ -す→して 殺す(korosu)+しまう=殺してしまう 刺す(sasu)+しまう=刺してしまう /group 3/ -く,-ぐ→いて 書く(kaku)+しまう=書いてしまう 研ぐ(togu)+しまう=...


13

The verb is 捨てる, so its て-form is 捨てて, hence the compound form Vて+しまう becomes 捨ててしまう. If it were the casual ちゃう instead of しまう that you were using, that starts from the て-form too, but also contracts the て, so it would instead be 捨てちゃう, with just the one て. Perhaps that is where the confusion arose? Hope that helps!


-1

My conclusion: Time can also be a target of a verb. The target is for the verb to be performed at the time marked by に. It is not just part of the context around the verb (the place where the verb happen, the means by which the verb happen...) therefore で is not suitable. for example: 「2020年に日本に行く」 The target of 「行く」is to go to japan and to be there ...


1

Target of the verb is one of many usages of particle に. It is also used to mark a place, a point in time, originator of action in passive sentences and more While dictionary is not a primary source for grammar, for starters you can check out https://jisho.org/word/%E3%81%AB So marking a time is simply within a scope of what に does. That said: で is also used ...


6

Indeed both are possible due to the potential form of いただく heading the verb. That said, I think が is very slightly more natural here, because you don’t really want to focus on the customer and the fact they can choose drinks (which feels very slightly less polite), but rather the drinks and the fact they can be chosen by the customer. I just used the ...


2

Your suspicion is entirely correct. The が marks the potential verb. I think I would personally view お選びいただけます as a single (albeit compounded) verb, just as a I would view 選んでもらえる (which holds the same meaning) as a single (but again compounded) verb, so maybe that's a helpful way to think about this sort of construction taking が? That all said, the use of ...


0

「って 」is an informal equivalent of 「というのは」.Therefore, it is used in the same situations than 「という」in spoken spoken language rather than written. トロって何ですか トロというのは何ですか "What doesトロ mean?" or "What is トロ?" When using informal speech, the は particle is sometimes ommitted, and that's why you don't see it in your sentence either. In this case, というのは ...


0

Maybe you could interpret it as "the same as saying, as in". と言う say, ように same. ソニーのようなのような means "same" as in/the same as saying "a company famous like Sony."


2

The「というように」in the second and third examples is hard to translate, but you could kind of imagine it as if it gave quotation marks to the previous statement, like「『夏には冷たい飲み物、冬には温かい飲み物』というように…」. In this sense, the literal meaning would still be akin to "As if to say, 'cold drinks in the summer, warm drinks in the winter', (...)". Still, it doesn't turn it into ...


0

Xというように would literally mean "in a way which says X". From which we can extrapolate: 分かったというように = in a way which says he understood = as if to say that he understood. 冬には温かい飲み物というように = in a way which says that it's warm drinks in winter = in a way which dictates it will be warm drinks in winter = in such a way that it will be warm drinks in winter. etc.


8

At the very core of your sentence, the parsing is as follows: 血糖値が[Number]しか上がらなかった。The blood sugar only rose by [Number]. All the other stuff is just details which modify that core statement in some respect. Let's add in some extra details to the core statement. 血糖値が77ミリグラムしか上がらなかった。 The blood sugar only rose by 77mg. Now you can add in a clause ...


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