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By the time I'd read as far as と I was over 99% certain this was a conditional. Why? It couldn't be 'and' because that can only modify a noun/noun phrase and we have a verb. It could have been a quote, but "X said that the state will investigate in March this year" sounds oddly specific. Besides which, who is X? I don't think it could be the state itself. ...


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In your sentence, 食べ物 is the subject, and 人気が出てきた is modifying, describing 食べ物. It is what I would call an "adjectival phrase" in English (I don't know if the term is linguistically right in Japanese, but hopefully it helps to understand the function of the clause). Therefore, you are to parse the sentence like this: (ヘルシーな食べ物) が (人気が出てきた) ということです。 Let's ...


2

So, I'm grasping at straws a little, but I can see some sort of logic... I would say that この公園では猿が子供を育てている(x)ところ(を)写真に撮ることが出来る。 is the right way to fill in the blanks. I feel like you need the を somewhere if the 写真 isn't being 撮る’d. So why is the 猿が子供を育てているところ is being 撮る’d in my suggestion? To explain that, I think it's helpful to view the とる family of ...


3

Firstly, classing Japanese verbs can't be done in the same way as with English verbs. The linguistic terminology is generally different because of the incongruities between the languages. While you can call the English verb "to make" an infinitive, calling 作る or 作ること an infinitive is not quite correct. It is sometimes known as the Dictionary form, or Plain ...


7

I think these two これs are referring to different things. In これで決定, これ is referring to the current situation (i.e. what just happened) so a translation would be "and with this/because of this, I have decided". This これ is not talking about what was decided. See this link. In これに決めた, これ is talking about what was decided. "I decided on this".


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To take a more common example, you will often hear people responding to new information with そうですか。 This is not a question. It is more like "Oh, I see."


3

This と is a kind of "listing" particle. Please see Function of と when used with 続く for similar examples. In this sentence, it is marking two reasons/examples regarding the statement 長閑な町だ (ie, "There are 木々 and there are 雑木林, so this is a 長閑な town."). Sometimes a writer uses only one たり even when two items are explicitly present. (I personally dislike it, ...


1

In short, relative (adjectival) clauses (that is, short phrases modifying a noun), の can replace が. There's really not much to say about it, other than that it is only used in very short clauses (usually subject の verb-or-adjective, and that's it), and if it's ambiguous with a "possessive" の than you either can't use it, or it has to "work either way". You ...


12

This function of this か is not purely phonetic, but rather serves to make the sentence less of a outward statement and more of a self-directed or self-reflecting one. It makes the information value of sentence primarily be “I had considered ~ previously but wasn’t sure, but in the end it indeed it is 〜, huh...” It’s often is accompanied by やっぱり (or 予想通り ...


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Both of の and が is OK to understand above two sentence. The reason is because 侍 have 主人, and 男 have 顔(usually). But sometimes の and が can't be used. 〇 Aさんが私に書いた地図 ✕ Aさんの私に書いた地図 →because 地図 doesn't belong to Aさん 〇 Bさんが私にくれた時計 ✕ Bさんの私にくれた時計 →because 時計 doesn't belong to B さん


5

じょ used to be a very common sentence-ender in Awa (Tokushima) dialect, although it's becoming obsolete, like other dialects. Looks like じぇ is a sentence-ender in Iwate dialect. That being said, this character's speech is not dialectal at all, so basically this is just another unique キャラ語尾 used to add flavor to a character. Some キャラ語尾 are "recycled" ones ...


1

I think it's a mix of the two: a "dialectical" (or perhaps just personal) "pronounce ぞ/ぜ as じょ/じぇ" thing (but only specifically for the sentence-ending particles). I feel like, in fictional media like video games, manga, and anime, sentence-enders are the very first thing that gets "tweaked" to indicate some sort of dialectical or individual, quirky ...


4

As far as lyrics are concerned, in the Japanese culture, the original lyrics are never modified even when they are sung by someone of the opposite sex. If the original lyrics say わよ, a male singer sing them as わよ. That's not strange at all, and no one thinks he is gay. (In English-speaking cultures, this may not be true. You can see "his" changed to "her", ...


2

The や here isn't the particle, it's 屋, which means "shop", and is very commonly used as a suffix to words to represent places that sell exclusively, or mainly, that thing. So ラーメン屋 is the ramen store, just like 本屋 is a bookstore, and サイゼリヤ is the place where you buy saizeri (actually that last one's not true).


4

With a cursory glance at that sentence, I think it means something closer to 'Isn't it just that you can't express what you're thinking to people?' 自分の思ってること is 'a thing one is thinking', not necessarily in regards to themselves. 人 here just means 'people generally'; it's not あの人. 伝える is more 'to convey' or 'to express', and 伝えられない is indeed negative ...


2

It is called(動詞の)テ形. Also, [品詞]{ひん・し} means "part of speech" which would help when you Google things like that.


2

Xでもある and Xもある are different. Xでもある is Xである with も ("also") added after で. Xもある is the same as Xがある but が is replaced by も ("also"). Xである = is X Xでもある = is also X Xがある = there is X Xもある = there is also X Compare the following sentences: 冷蔵庫にはリンゴもあり、バナナもある。 In the fridge, there is an apple, and there is a banana, too. 彼の好きな食べ物はリンゴでもあり、バナナでもある。 His favorite ...


3

I think you understand the parts of the sentence very well. The only thing that seems a little off about your translation is that it suggests the family is retrospectively thinking about having paid 100万円. But as you note, で marks a "manner of action", i.e. the part 一体どんな気持ちで is about how the family felt before or at the time of paying 100万円. So I would ...


0

で marks some sort of means by which something is done, be it some sort of tool, a location, a material, an amount of time. In many ways, this acts as an adverb marker When a place functions as an adverb, a place where something is done, で is the particle you want to use. に acts as a locus marker. It marks a place a person or thing exists, moves, or is ...


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