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5

I also believe the word fuck has too many meaning too, but... There's a word for it: まぐわう. This dictionary even has "ファックする"(To fuck). It's a word that we don't see much anymore (because we have ヤる, セックスする, etc...), but I think it will be understood by most people. ...Maybe.


4

So, the question is a bit awkwardly phrased and the emphasis on “fuck” is a bit over the top, but I did try to find a native Japanese word for “to have sexual intercourse”. As you may know, native Japanese words are commonly called 大和言葉 (Yamato kotoba), so I searched for “性交する 大和言葉” and came across this page which reviews a book “Speaking Yamato Japanese ...


9

意味は同じになるのですが、「我慢しなさい」の「なさい」と「我慢なさい」の「なさい」は、文法的にちょっと異なるもので、 「しなさい」= 動詞「する」の連用形「し」+ やわらかな命令を表す補助動詞「なさい」 「なさい」= 動詞「なす・する」の尊敬語「なさる」の命令形 なので、 「我慢しなさい」は、サ変動詞「我慢する」の連用形「我慢し」+ やわらかな命令を表す補助動詞「なさい」 「我慢なさい」は、サ変動詞「我慢する」の「する」が尊敬語「なさる」に、更に命令形「なさい」になったもの のように考えてはどうでしょうか。 「~なさい」のほうは、「~しなさい」よりも、少し古風な、より丁寧な、やわらかい感じがします。そのため、男性よりも女性に使われることが多く、女性的な響きがあるのかな、と思います。


7

It is gradually known that various grammaticalized copula-ending constructions play key roles in the Japanese grammar. For this reason, Japanese as a whole exhibits strong preference for noun predicate in comparison to average European languages. (FYI there is a book (didn't read) recently published in English that claims it is an areal feature in Asia-...


-2

Some Japanese nouns can function as -suru verbs. That means that these nouns can be expressed as in a state of being in reality and as in a state of doing whatever their assumed function of existing in reality is, which can lead to the type of grammatical ambiguity that you are experiencing. (To expound on the second sentence: a waterwheel is often moving. ...


1

Your understanding of ようだ is correct. It does mean something like “parece ser.” ようで and ような are both derived from ようだ. The former is the conjunctive form whereas the latter modifies a noun like a な-adjective. In this case, 恋をしているよう and 躍らされてるよう are connected by で and they both modify 鼓動, which is also modified by 高鳴る. 踊らされてる is the result of the following ...


2

Yes, 難しく and 考える are grouped here. The ku-form is a form used to modify a verb, in other words, it works like an adverb. See this article, too. 速く走る to run fast よく考える to think hard 弱く叩く to hit/tap lightly 格好良く踊る to dance in a cool manner Likewise, 難しく考える means "to think in a difficult/complicated way".


3

I learned at school that we can infer the verb type from its ない form: the sound right before ない has an あ(a) vowel ⇒ 五段(godan) verb the sound right before ない has an い(i) vowel ⇒ 上一段(kami-ichidan) verb the sound right before ない has an え(e) vowel ⇒ 下一段(shimo-ichidan) verb For example, you can infer that... 聞く is 五段 verb from its ない form きかない (kika-nai) 見る is ...


2

移行する is not used in this sentence. It's the te-form of ~にする ("to make [something] ~") followed by the subsidiary verb 行く ("gradually", "over time") in its volitional form. A very literal translation would be "Let's (gradually) make (our society) such a society."


2

I'm not sure I want to delve into the matter of past vs perfect at the start of this (see the bottom of this answer for this detail). Let's consider the phrase that you have: みぎ手をあらわす「𠂇」と、「口」(くち)をあわせた字 We can make a whole sentence for what's being said, 右という字はみぎ手をあらわす「𠂇」と、「口」(くち)をあわせた字です。 We can translate this into English as The character 右 is a ...


3

To expand on sbkgs4686's answer, I'd like to go a bit further into the history of the modern passive ending ~られる, and of the modern verb of potential, 得る【える】. The history of ~られる Let's start by looking at the modern passive ending ~られる and how this has developed through the years. Monograde form The modern passive ending ~られる has a regular 下一段【しもいちだん】 ...


7

下を向く is just looking down, moving/keeping your head towards your feet. 見下ろす is used when you are looking at something that is at lower altitudes than where you are - looking at the scenery from a mountain, looking at the clouds from inside an airplane, looking at the streets below from a building, looking at someone from the second floor etc. So in your case,...


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