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5

We say 傘をさす, but さす is 差す in kanji. 傘をさす is a set phrase you have to learn by rote. 傘をする is occasionally used in reality, too, but it may be considered wrong in exams. 傘をかける means "to hang an umbrella (on a hook)". We virtually never say 傘を浴びる in daily life. This usage of 差す corresponds to the sixth definition of 差す in jisho.org. You may want to ...


2

Technically speaking, は in a negative sentence specifies what's negated. (Note that it's practically not necessarily the case depending on verbal emphasis.) 今日は勉強をしない (You may study another day.) 今日、勉強はしない (You may do other things.) Practically, however, people often use は just because the predicate is negative. So, although it depends on usages, there's ...


3

The correct term to use for 'check out' is チェックアウト. 退社 is not used for that. The kanji 社 indicates that the 'leaving' is directly related to work or the workplace, not a hotel/ryokan etc. None of the standard dictionaries list the meaning relating to hotels/ryokan which you suggest. See here for examples of the word being used from the year 1899, with the ...


4

受付 is a noun that means "reception desk". 受付け(を)する or 受付けを済ませる mean "check in".  受付けに行く means "to go to the reception desk". He may check in or just may ask receptionists for information about something.


0

I believe there's a rule to convert verbs into nouns. All you have to do is to turn a Verb into its Verb stem form & it can be used as a noun. To prove this, I would like to cite Tae Kim's Guide to learning Japanese and 皆の日本語・初版 I 本冊, lesson 13. There is a similar pattern in both cases. Tae Kim's Guide to Learning Japanese > Complete Guide >Verbs &...


4

In this case, "て" in "寒くて" plays a role of "so". Here is an awesome article. Refer to the part 〜くて FOR "SO". 寒くてはっきりしゃべれない It's very cold so I can't speak clearly. Next, "て" in "落ち着いて" works like adverbs. Also awesome article. Refer to the part て FORM FOR LINKING ACTIONS. 落ち着いて歩く walk relaxedly ...


3

ぼうしをかぶり、ワンピースをきた(きている)じょせい ワンピースとぼうしをみにつけた(つけている)じょせい ぼうしとワンピースをみにつけた(つけている)じょせい ワンピースをき、ぼうしをかぶった(かぶっている)じょせい 帽子{ぼうし}を被{かぶ}る、ワンピースを着{き}る、ズボン/スカートを穿{は}く、ソックス/靴下{くつした}/靴{くつ}を履{は}く。アクセサリーを着{つ}ける(付{つ}ける) 身{み}に着{つ}ける is a verb phrase that can be applied to anything. But it sounds formal. I'm not good at English. This is my first post. I hope this post helps.


2

You could consider two interpretations. Omission from double nominative このカメラは 対象が よく写る よく写る itself expresses a capability. Incidentally, you can't really use 写す when the camera is the subject because it's an inanimate object, which doesn't take actions at its own will.


2

I think the general answer to your question is "yes" (assuming the second "noun" is a する-verb noun), but I do think the flavor/meaning of the phrase changes. I expect the differences are roughly equivalent to English "I'm going to do some piano practice now" vs "I'm going to practice piano now". In general I'd expect ...


4

As this answer says, these "special suru-verbs" are tricky and unstable. They conjugate sometimes like a suru-verb and sometimes like a godan-verb. However, they never turn to dekiru-form like normal suru-verbs do. That is, we can say 運転できる or 勉強できる but not 属できる nor 発できる. One workaround is to conjugate them as godan verbs (発せる, 属せる, 察せる). However, ...


3

Add "did not", "does not", etc., and that's it. 食べてみる: try eating it 食べてみない: does not to try eating it (rather than "to try not to eat") 食べ物を作ってくれる: make food (for me) 食べ物を作ってくれない: does not make food (for me) 食べておく: eat in advance 食べておかない: does not eat in advance お母さんは私を𠮟ってくれない means something odd like "She doesn't scold me (although I want to be scolded)"...


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