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1

そんなの is "something like that", "such a thing", or in this context, "such a question". (に)は has been omitted after it. 秒で is a recent slangy adverb meaning "in a second" or "instantly". Use with caution. 答えられます is the (polite) potential form of 答える. そんなの秒で答えられます。 I can answer such a question instantly.


0

context is key here... as stated that's like a robot saying "Thank you" for holding still while it rips your arm off. It's technically correct... so much technically that it fails to be practical or meaningful in any way other than showing the strict adherence to the rules of the language. Would a native speaker understand it? Sure, then they'd look at you ...


1

While grammatically correct, it sounds completely unnatural because it's never used in practice. Someone hearing this will definitely think you are playing with words, distorting ありがとうございます as part of a joke, probably to mean you are not thankful, but it depends on the context. It's pretty non standard so using it to try to convey "thanks, but no thanks" ...


2

EDIT: sorry, I've rechecked the episode, and he says おはようじゃない. Still negation of a common aisatsu, just not a keigo-negation. The translation stands, though. Not quite the same, but I've heard "ohayou gozaimasu" followed by "ohayou gozaimasen!!!" in an anime. The second character was obviously trying to convey extreme displeasure with the circumstances, ...


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It's not common at all and I don't remember whether I've heard it in my entire life, but ありがとうございません is not gibberish, and it could pass as a meaningful wordplay to describe ありがた迷惑 if used in an appropriate situation. "Thanks but no thanks" could be usable in an ordinary conversation, but ありがとうございません is a pure joke and it's never used when you are truly ...


11

While it’s not impossible to interpret, it is unusual (far more than “thanks, but no thanks”). This is mainly because the grammatical construction of 〜うございます is mostly no longer productive and ありがとうございます is completely lexicalized, so you’re doing something odd to the end of a word. Similar to だいじょばない, perhaps. You could imagine this being used by an anime ...


2

巡る has many meanings, one of which is related to the "cycle" of months, seasons or ages: 4 まわって再びもとに返る。「春がまた―・ってくる」「―・る月日」 巡り巡って ("around and around", "all the way around") is an emphatic adverb made from 巡る, and it is safely used with 夏, too. In this case it roughly means "no matter how many summers come" or "even many years later in the summer". There ...


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I haven't known the word "Red herring"!! And I confirmed the article below. https://literarydevices.net/red-herring/ It's not originally from Japanese so this may not be the answer for you, but we commonly use "ミスリード" as the loan word of 'mislead'. In most cases I think we can use that. Common Red Herring Examples: Example 2 (Eden example) Common ...


3

ウザい is a slangy adjective meaning "annoying", "irritating", "gets on my nerves", etc. It does not mean 多い. どす is a feminine Kyoto-ben variant of です. I think he used it not because he is a Kyotoite but because he wanted to make this sound milder by using a funny sentence ending (どす may be associated with sarcasm, too). CD3000枚でドヤるのも正直うざいどす Also, TBH ...


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