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4

As Chocolate pointed out, you seem to have missed the V1 + ては + V2 construction: "Te-form" versus "masu-stem + して" (消しているうちに versus 消ししているうちに) What does ては mean in this sentence? 〜しては is this a grammar pattern? So 飛びついては止める傾向 refers to the son's tendency to do 飛びつく and 止める as a paired action for many times. 止める (read やめる) in this ...


1

なにかな is a word to tell someone. なんだろう is a word to tell yourself. When you are talked to by someone, you should say なにかな to him or her and you should say なんだろう to yourself. なにかな and なんだろう means “What do you want to say?” “What is that?” “What?” “ I wonder what.” In some Japanese TV programs, a comedian has to answer what is in a box (It may be a snake ...


1

If it is towards a 目上の人, you can use 目にかかる. お目にかかれて嬉しいです But that's more of "It's nice to see you (again)" rather than "Nice to meet you (first time)".


4

It depends on what you mean by "nice to meet you" a) as the phrase, where it carries no / very little meaning of actually being happy to have met the person (instead of never ending up meeting) If a), "はじめまして" is probably the most natural one. OR b) To express actual delight of getting to meet the person, e.g when you have been really looking forward ...


5

This is an uncommon usage of English infinitive (to + <verb>) known as infinitive of result (as opposed to infinitive of purpose, which is much more common). To translate "only to ~" into Japanese, you usually have to split the clause into two and join them using が, けれど, etc. I did it again, only to fail. もう一度やってみましたが、失敗しただけでした。 I searched everywhere, ...


3

Looking at the subtitles on Netflix, it's よっこらしょっと, which seems to be a variation on よっこらしょ, which you can find in dictionaries. As you understood, it's something said when exerting effort.


0

A few things that I've found along the way that might be related are: 名ばかり e.g. 名ばかりの勝利 i.e. "a victory in name only" 犠牲が多くて引き合わない勝利 - "many sacrifices but unprofitable victory" 損害が大きく得るものが少ない勝利 - "much loss but few gains victory" And one that's similar, though not identical (but I did mention it above): 武勇戦{ぶゆうせん}に負けて軍略戦{ぐんりゃくせん}で勝つ - directly "lose ...


1

労而無功(労{ろう}して功{こう}なし、労多{ろうおお}くして功少{こうすく}なし) came up to me. Not 四字熟語{よじじゅくご} though,I think 骨折{ほねお}り損{ぞん}のくたびれ儲{もう}け is similar expression. I thought 四字熟語{よじじゅくご} only, otherwise I often use 勝{か}つには勝{か}ったけど、失{うしな}ったものも多{おお}い. I guess 首{くび}の皮一枚{かわいちまい}でつながる or 命{いのち}からがら帰還{きかん}する also work.


0

You could use the borrowed term ピュロスの勝利 (ピュロス is Pyrrhus!) - this isn't all that used (3k Google hits on the exact phrase), but it's clearly a concept. If you wanted to use non-loan words, the definitions for ピュロスの勝利 are usually given by 割に合わない勝利 or 割りに合わぬ勝利, meaning “a victory that isn’t worth it”. This likewise isn't a commonly-used phrase in itself, but ...


-1

I would expect teachers would say the sentence your brought up when the lesson finishes. Probably in a class room the teacher might close the lesson with the sentence. 纏めると、とりあえずこんな所か… Let's finish up. For the time being, that's enough? You also can say to yourself for sure when you are wondering if you achieved the enough outcome (normal tone) or not(...


6

Your guess is a good one. 「口{くち}が + [food item] + になる」 is an idiomatic expression that means a person is thinking about the particular food item so intensively that in his/her imagination, s/he feels as if his/her mouth were actually stuffed with that food item. For that reason (← unintentional occurance), the verb 「なる」 is very often used with 「しまう」 as ...


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