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9

I would say 「~~でできている」, as in: この腕時計は、[金]{きん}でできている。 The wristwatch is made out of gold. この家は、木でできている。 This house is made of wood. 女の子は何でできているの? ♪What are little girls made of?


0

While in English the word "gold" can easily mean both the colour and the metal, the Japanese word for "golden colour" is "金色" and the word for gold (metal) is "金" (read as きん), which makes it less ambiguous. Although there is also word "黄金" which indeed can mean both the colour and the metal, and "金" read as "かね", which can mean "money" or "metal" in ...


4

"Walk-in appointment" is not regarded as 予約 ("appointment") in Japan. It will usually be treated as 予約なし診療 (literally "appointment-less visit") or 予約外診療 (literally "outside-appointment visit") in Japan. This often means waiting for a long time in a hospital. Other options are: 当日予約: if you managed to make an appointment over the phone several hours before ...


1

飛{と}び込{こ}み is an expression with means jump in unannounced. For example, a "walk-in patient" would be a 飛び込みの患者{かんじゃ}.


4

古代の is just ancient, so I assume you're interested in the meaning of ロマン. First, it's completely different from ロマンス/romance (although romance may be etymologically related). ロマン (or 浪漫 in kanji) is a word that derived from romanticism in English. Today, it's somewhat a vague term used in various ways, but when it's used to describe the characteristic of a ...


5

円 is "circle", so 円形の島 usually just means a round island like this: If you want to say ring-shaped, 輪(状) or リング(状) is the correct term. If I understand your description correctly, you can say something like this: アトランティスは、中心にある島を2つの{輪状/リング状}の島が取り囲むような形をしている。


0

From what I've seen, it understandably varies, as there are many ways to express the same thing. For instance, if there is no commentary whatsoever, you might see: 声無し or similarly 声なし (without voice, e.g. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Kny-ik8Vr0), or perhaps more ambiguously 実況無し or similarly 実況なし (without 'reporting live', e.g. https://www.youtube.com/...


6

I used this website and noticed the left hand side looked like the child radical 子, then counted the strokes as 10 and found this 孫{まご}. Which has a kun-yomi that matches the furigana next to it as まご, the website lists the meaning as grandchild/descendent


8

The verb in this sentence is 助かる【たすかる】 ("to be saved"). 借りる【かりる】 ("to borrow") is irrelevant. シェリーちゃんが助かりますよーに! I hope Sherry will be saved! シェリーちゃん: Sherry(-chan) が: (subject marker) 助かります: masu-form of the intransitive verb 助かる ("to be saved") よーに: a casual/slangy rendering of ように, which is used to make a wish. See: ending sentences with ように and How ...


2

First off, I don't think the kanji you identified is acting as its own word, my hunch is that the actual word you are looking for is 「助{たす}かります」. This is an intransitive verb that means to be saved, to be escape harm, or to be helped. see jsiho. The injection of a non-relative-temporal noun right before a verb without a particle when more polite -ます form ...


3

水洗式 does not refer to a flush toilet itself, but it refers to a method/system. 水: water 洗: wash / clean 式: -type So 水洗式 (literally "water-wash type") can refer to anything that can be washed, flushed or wiped with water. In layman terms it usually refers to a type of toilet, but in this case, it describes a type of 浸透液. The Wikipedia article you linked has ...


3

全数 clearly means "all", and 全数検査 means everything is subject to inspection. The opposing concept is 標本調査/検査 ("sampling survey"), where only a random subset of the target will be inspected. "Every time" may also be a valid translation depending on what they are checking.


-1

You've included a link to Chiebukuro but that site actually links the more helpful kotobank definitions here. First, both readings are correct. It isn't a case of one or the other being right or wrong. There are times when Japanese words can have the exact same kanji and be read in different ways, with one being considered 'correct' - this is called 慣用読み ("...


1

Are you referring to this physical board itself? Then there is no well-known specific name for this type of board. It's probably just called ボード or 情報ボード. Handheld smaller boards (roughly the same size as sketchbooks) are commonly called フリップ. See these image search results. Text digitally superimposed on screen is called テロップ. Or are are you referring to ...


2

According to kanshudo.com counts, 幾何 and its derivatives are the only words that can be encountered among the frequent lexicon. However, there is at least [誰何]{すいか}する “challenging (an unknown person); asking a person's identity” which is rare but still completely recognizable. Of course, any (Classical) Chinese word can theoretically be a Japanese one read ...


6

ごね出した【だした】 means "started to grumble." 出す is one of the syntactic compound verb elements. After the masu-stem of a verb, it means "to begin to ~", similarly to ~始める. See: What is the difference between 出す and 始める when used as a suffix?


4

映り込み is one option, but if you want a more catchy and specific word, there is a word 見切れ【みきれ】, which is a noun form of the verb 見切れる. 見切れ 見切れ、見切れるとは、メインの被写体以外のもの(特に見えていてはいけないもの)が画像、映像、視界などに入ることである。舞台や映像業界の用語。 For example, Origami Cyclone is an anime character who is a serious "photobomber", and he is known as 見切れ職人 ("Artisan of 見切れ") in the Japanese ...


0

I couldn't find a word on the web that is exactly similar to "photobomb". The closest thing I turned up is 写{うつ}り込{こ}み. As in, 知{し}らない人{ひと}が私{わたし}の写真{しゃしん}に写{うつ}り込{こ}んだ (A stranger photobombed my picture).


5

You are correct that there are many more common uses of the 訓読み なに or なん for 何 when compared with the words which use the 音読み カ. But here is one example: The word for 'geometry' is: 幾何学 (きかがく) - definition Although it also seems to appear in words like 如何せん (いかんせん) or 如何 (いかが), I don't think those are strictly standard usages of the readings but more ...


1

I watched the video of the short speech and Shigeru Miyamoto definitely says 作り始めましょう、っていうことになったんですけど... First off, it doesn't matter if there's a period or a comma. Like in English, the meaning stays the same ("I accept it. However..." / "I accept it, however"). Then - like you've already demonstrated with 対談 - ことになった means "it was decided". So what ...


3

まず、この文脈での「驚く」は、surprised というよりも、disappointed に近い意味で使われています。 ですので、「ショック」「衝撃」のような、爆発的な印象はあまりありません。 ①「同じ過ちを繰り返す自分に呆れた」 これを「同じ過ちを繰り返す自分に驚いた」と言い換えるのは可能です。 「うんざりした」も使えると思います。ですが「飽きた」は使いません。 この使い分けを考える場合、この文章に「後悔している」といった意味も含まれていると考えると分かりやすいかもしれません。 ②「呆れただろう!子どもっぽいって!」 これも「呆れる」が「がっかり」を意味していると考えて問題ありません。 また「いえいえ、そんなことは思ってない!」と否定しているのは、主に「子どもっぽい」の部分かと思います。 (...


6

「あきれる」には、多少の驚きや意外に思う気持ちは含まれていますが、爆発的な衝撃というニュアンスはありません。溜め息が出そうな気持ちや、この絵文字 (🤷)みたいな感じも「あきれる」で表現できます。 明鏡国語辞典で「あきれる」を引くと、「物事の異常さや言動の非常識さなどに驚いてとまどいを感じる」という定義になっており、「ふつう驚きとともに非難や愛想づかしの意がこもる」という注釈がついています。つまり、単に「驚いた」という気持ちだけではなく「非常識だ」「バカだ」という気持ちが普通は入っているということです。文脈によっては驚きの意味がほとんどなく、「バカだ、どうしようもない」という意味の方が中心になることもあると思います。あなたの挙げた3つの例はいずれも、「驚いた」よりも「なんてバカなんだろう」...


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