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3

As with many things in Japanese (informal language in particular), this is based on context. If you meet someone for the first time in a while, it would make sense to ask them if they are well, rather than asking them if they think you look well. Pronouns are often dropped when it is obvious who is being refereed to. Unlike many other languages there is no ...


2

Keep in mind, "良い" by itself, it not usually pronounced like "yoi". Most of them say, "ii". However, in past tense, Japanese people will say "yokatta!" (良かった), and 仲良い is pronounced "nakayoi". And like naruto pointed out, the word for readiness is "Youi", not "Yoi"


30

They are different words. They are not only different in kanji/kana but also very different in pronunciation. 良い = よい = good, nice 用意 = ようい = preparation, readiness That is, 用意 has an elongated vowel, which is a distinguishing feature in the Japanese language. For details, see long-vowels tag and this question: Are there many occurances of elongated ...


-1

I think 天然 roughly means "naive". Calling someone 天然 is not offensive; 天然 is not offensive word


-1

A) 六時半に母とばんごはんをつくりました。(At 6:30, I made dinner with my mother.) B) よるごはんのあと家族とえいがをみました。(After dinner, I watched a movie with my family.) Look at statement B). It stated with Yoru BanGohan No Ato. in this case it is trying to convey that the timing is Night or Evening Time. It is not talking about Dinner. It is two seperate words. It should be read as よる、...


2

I don't see any reason these words (or combination of letters) should be censored in Japanese language. To my full imagination, there are no slang, rhyme, abbreviation or metaphor that makes these phrases offensive. In an unofficial wiki of the game, they list some of the words/phrases that are sensored in the in-game chat. The writer seems to agree with us;...


6

No, and I think you could have looked up 便利屋 in a dictionary before coining random words. 八百屋 doesn't deal with eight hundreds, nor department store is called 部門店. 便利屋 would roughly translates to odd-jobber; they deal with all sort of chores, including delivery of small amounts, fixing houses and so on. Originally they refer to the job as an occupation, but ...


5

小頭(kogashira) is an archaic term denoting a leader of a smaller group who works under the supervision of 大頭(oogashira). It is no longer used. I believe there are a lot of Japanese who do not know what the term 小頭 denotes because it is almost never used in contemporary Japanese. I, born and educated in Japan, would be surprised if there were a person ...


15

check out this excerpt from 大辞林第三版 on ませ ませ( 助動 ) 〔丁寧の助動詞「ます」の命令形〕 ① 「いらっしゃる」「おっしゃる」「くださる」「なさる」「申す」「召す」などの動詞の連用形に付いて,相手に対して,その動作をするようにという要求を,丁寧の気持ちを含めて言い表す。 「くれぐれも御自愛くださいませ」 「十分お気をつけなさいませ」 ② 挨拶(あいさつ)の語句に用いて,語調を丁寧にする。 「お帰りなさいませ」 〔② は,元来,「よくお帰りなさいました」のような言い方の省略した形「お帰りなさい」を,命令の言い方と混同して,それに「ます」の命令形「ませ」を付けて,丁寧な気持ちを添えようとしたところからできたもの〕 → まし(助動) ・ ます(助動) We ...


3

A common way of asking a group of people a yes or no question about something directly related to them is using the pattern: 〜した人? When I hear this, I immediately jump to an image of a teacher asking a group of students a yes/no question in class and they all raising their hands while saying "はい". For example, 今日の給食が美味しかった人? Who liked today's (provided) ...


13

「こんばんみ」 is a greeting presumably created and definitely made popular by comedian ビビる大木 a couple of decades ago. As always, some people like to mimic whatever schtick they hear on TV that they find "cool" or simply "new". 「こんばんみ」 was even more popular a decade or two ago than it is now. I was a bit surprised to hear you still hear/see it often enough. ...


-2

I would call a non-native speaker of Japanese [非日本語話者]{ひにほんごわしゃ}, though it might sound a little bit academic.


7

Simply, you can use 非【ひ】ネイティブ or 非ネイティブスピーカー.


6

「この際{さい}だからちゃんと話{はな}すという手も」 is a valid and natural-sounding "sentence" as-is in informal and/or spoken Japanese. That it lacks a verb at the end should not surprise you if you are someone who has already been watching anime in the original Japanese. The verb phrase that is left unsaid at the end would be 「ある」、「あると思{おも}う」、「あるんじゃない?」、「あるでしょう」, 「あるよね」, etc. ...


7

I think you could use [餌]{えさ}. あなたの猫はどんな餌を食べますか? or more simply... あなたの猫は何を食べますか?


3

I personally would use 個 (こ). That should work alright for what you are trying to do.


4

仕入れる also means 'to gain new information that may be useful' and て来る(てくる) is called a kind of subsidiary verb - in this context, it means 'to get back after doing something'. Actually in this situation, this て来る doesn't have much meaning because B just wanted to emphasize WHERE A heard that story. So 'どこで仕入れたんだそんなような話' is almost the same as the original ...


4

This is just the expansion of my comment, but I can suggest an alternative way of translation of world as 国 ("land; country; kingdom"), if you only mean that "a place where things of a kind gather". While 世界 is the likely translation for that word in most cases, it bears a nuance of a "self-contained environment" that has its own collection of history, ...


11

counters are based on size and shape of physical items I'm not sure what you mean by this, but not really --- I'd say we choose counters based upon what we perceive the object to be. So, for ebooks (as in Kindle), 冊 is used. When you see an object in immersive VR, corresponding counter for that object in real world is used. (On the other hand, developers ...


18

Though 温度 is a generic word for temperature, we prefer the specific 気温 "air temperature" everyday when we mention the weather, in conversation or in forecast. Same for 水温 of water, 体温 of body, 室温 of room etc. Especially, it'd almost sound like a joke if you described someone 温度が低い instead of 体温が低い (a languid person??). In my impression, 温度 is only preferred ...


-3

気象{きしょう}庁{ちょう} : "Japan Meteorological Agency defines「気温」as 通常は地上1.25~2.0mの大気の温度を摂氏(℃)単位で表す。度の単位に丸めるときは十分位を四捨五入するが、0度未満は五捨六入する。 I could not find the original page in the site, but searching the definition of temperature on the site gives this piece of pdf : Chapter 2 Measurement of Temperature. It explains, 2.1 Definition and units Heat ...


1

温度 is a more general term for temperature, whereas 気温 is the atmospheric temperature, specifically.


5

If this "Paper World" is an existing Western company name, you usually have to leave it untranslated or use katakana ペーパーワールド. (Note that there is already a company with the same name.) Unlike Chinese which tries to convert every foreign name into kanji, Japanese people usually just use Latin alphabet or katakana for branding of foreign names. You should not ...


4

Should it be "pepa kai", "kami kai" or something else? I think that you are going to get a variety of answers. I think that in this case, you will actually be better using the katakana version of the English phrase 'Paper World,' which is ぺーパーワールド. Using the Japanese 界 may be confusing, as かい (kai) could be interpreted as one of many things, including ...


5

Background The first thing to be aware of is that this poem was composed in Chinese by the poet 于 濆 (Yú Fén) in roughly 874. (Brief Chinese Wikipedia article about the poet here.) As such, the Japanese version must be viewed as a translation. And if you've ever done much translation yourself, particularly of poetry, you've probably come to understand ...


7

As said in l’électeur’s answer, it’s far more likely that you’d use some longer phrase to describe such a word. However, it seems like there is some currency for the term 「外行語{がいこうご}」, born as a reversal of 外来語. It doesn’t show up as in option in my kanji completion list, and its usage seems fairly minimal, but it is intuitive enough (written, not so much ...


17

I do not know of a monolectic term for that though there might exist one. The polylectic term that should be understood by virtually all adult native Japanese speakers would be 「日本語{にほんご}からの借用語{しゃくようご}」. By inserting 「[language name] + における」 in front of the term above, you can safely and unambiguously say "word(s) borrowed from Japanese (used in [language ...


4

This 線 refers to a possible way of thinking, a possible solution (among others), an approach, etc. This is often used in detective stories. 物事を行う道筋・方針。「その線で交渉しよう」 (デジタル大辞泉) 物事を行う上での(漠然とした)方針や道筋。「その線で考えてみよう」(明鏡国語辞典 第二版) 8. line (of action); position; approach; policy; principle (jisho.org)


7

After googling about a bit, I hit on a likely thread. I suspect that the actual message is something like the following. The piece that you specifically mention is in bold. お掛【か】けになった電話【でんわ】は電波【でんぱ】の届【とど】かない場所【ばしょ】にあるか​電源【でんげん】が入【はい】っていないため​かかりません。 Breaking down the translation of the bolded portion: 電源【でんげん】  が 入【はい】っていない ため power [SUBJ] in   ...


9

何それ? is not necessarily rude, but it is certainly informal. As such, it should probably only be used with friends or family or in an informal environment. Using it outside those boundaries might risk it sounding somewhat brusque or perhaps even rude. A standard polite alternative is: それは何ですか。 What is that?


6

Are you looking for a medical (psychiatric) term, or are you looking for a word laypeople know? Anyway, candidates include: 白昼夢: "daydream"; a dream seen while awake 夢想(的): "dream; vision"; basically a stiff kango version of 夢 幻覚(的): "hallucination"; a psychiatric term known to laypeople; usually not associated with fantastical elements or decreased ...


2

Personally I haven't seen this term being used around in Japanese literature much. The reason why might be because how small most housing is in Japan, the creation of a man cave would be somewhat luxurious. So there might be no real equivalent other than putting your manstuff in the same room as the bedroom or common space. That said: The easiest is to ...


4

It might not be common that a large manufacturer like Asahi making beer whose name contain 麦酒{ばくしゅ}. I think there are some microbrewery in Japan making craft beer whose name contain "麦{ばく}酒{しゅ} or the company name contains 麦酒{ばくしゅ} such as the company 「日本語: 北海道麦酒醸造株式会社, 英語: "HokkaidoBrewing"」. I think you often can buy 「小樽麦酒{おたるばくしゅ}」by the company at ...


13

麦酒 is no longer used, although it remains in some company names (example). 青空文庫全文検索 provides the frequency data based on the birth year of authors. According to this and this, 麦酒 was a less common alternative for ビール already before WWII. 麦酒 dropped out of use somewhere after WWII (I think it's very soon after WWII; my grandfather in his nineties uses ビール).


3

映画 Film; Movie; Motion Picture For example, you would use this when referring to a film you would watch in a cinema. It is used in the Japanese word for cinema (映画館) as well as a few of these examples: 映画監督 - Film Director 映画祭 - Film Festival 映画学校 - Film School 動画 Video Used for animation and online videos (such as YouTube). 動画配信 / ビデオ・オン・デマンド - ...


2

This 人物像の特定 means identifying what kind of person the speaker is seeing (e.g., "He looks like a brave knight in a silver armor", "He looks like a tired middle-aged businessperson", ...). By the way, 人物の特定 is identifying who he is (e.g., "He is John Smith").


5

I guess your trouble amounts to the difference between 病気【びょうき】 and 病【やまい】. In modern Japanese, yamai is a grandiose word that usually refers to serious, often life-threatening diseases. The duration is not important because many serious yamai are acute (like acute brain strokes). On the other hand, byoki is a generic and casual term for sickness/illness/...


2

日本でカーニバルと言われると、 narutoさんが言われている様に、復活祭の前に行われる欧州・南米等のカーニバル 日本で南米のカーニバルを模して、サンバ系の音楽と共にパレードするイベント その他、パレードが同時に行われるイベント(maybe same as tuomo's explanation) といったことを想像します。 お祭りと言われますと、風習としてある期間に実施されるお祭りから、 学校や会社で実施される皆んなで騒いで盛り上がる行事もお祭りと呼んでしまいます。 このお祭りという言葉には、カーニバルも含まれています。


4

祭り refers to festivals in general; it can refer to all sorts of festivals all over the world, religious or non-religious. カーニバル specifically refers to carnivals celebrated in Christian countries, or events derived from that. It's also commonly associated with Samba since Rio's Carnival is world-famous. Japan is not a Christian country, so there is no ...


0

No, at least not the duration. In Japan, as the carnivals are typically more like short events with their theme being the original carnival, and, as Japanese "don't have time" their matsuris, while being short [maybe 0.5 ... 3 days], may last longer than the Japanese "carnivals", which tend to be [very] short versions of the original ones, with e.g. the Rio ...


5

設定 in this context is "(character) settings", i.e., how the author characterize a person in the plot. Normally, a character in a story don't talk about his own 設定, but this may be some sort of metafictional joke. ギリギリ is an adjective that literally means "nearing the borderline/edge/extremity". In this context, the character is talking about the borderline ...


2

As you already know, 異常 is abnormal and 異状 is closer to unusual, but the latter is a relatively uncommon word used in limited situations. Unless your job is related to military or security, you usually don't have to worry about 異状 in speech. In addition, the meanings of these words are close enough, and I doubt this pair can result in misunderstanding in ...


2

According to 「異常」と「異状」 | ことば(放送用語) - 放送現場の疑問・視聴者の疑問 | NHK放送文化研究所, the site explains Q.「(健康診断で)イジョウがない」という場合、「異常」と「異状」のうち、どちらの漢字を使えばよいでしょうか。 In case, "there is nothing wrong in health check", which kanji「異常」or「異状」should I use to describe it? A. 「診断結果は異常なし」など、「異常」を用います。 "There is nothing wrong in health check", etc. We use「異常」for it. They follow 「...


4

Firstly, お開きにしましょう means "let's wrap it up" not "let's get started." I guess you can kind of think of it as the people are going to spread out and move away. I'm not sure of the full etymology. Therefore #2 is the most appropriate, and #3 would be the complete opposite. Option #1 would be kind of a strange interaction. A: "Let's wrap things up now" ...


2

かな at the end of a question sentence ending with の is a bit of a reflexive ending that provides the nuance of wondering about what is being asked. Consider, then: どうしてこのサイトに来てるの? Why did you come to this site? vs. どうしてこのサイトに来てるのかな? I wonder why you have come to this site.


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