New answers tagged

1

この料金には何が付いていますか Without context, it is bit difficult to imagine what this sentence is. Probably there are various plans gives you something extra in addition to the plan alone. If the phrases are used in that sense, you are asking what extra is in it. For example, ordering some courses of meal at restaurant, you may be able to add noodles besides basic ...


2

This is only a partial answer, but I think you might be correct in your assumption that there is a connection between the two words, despite the kanji being different. There are many homophones in Japanese and this means that there are often instances of coincidental phonetic equivalences. But in the case of your question, there could be a connection. ...


5

I don't think it's quite a catch-all phrase, but I guess people may use ゼミ for smaller specialized classes with more professor–student interaction, even if the professor actually gives all the lectures/talks. (I guess in this case you would use "course" and not "seminar" in English.) I don't think ゼミ would be used for the main compulsory classes in an ...


0

△ さんかく over internet could mean such thing as san is cool/handsome people write a name and put the △ in the end bcs sankaku could be . san ga kakkee (“_-san is cool/handsome”)with a little imagination so Name△ instead of writing it all


3

すんな is a contraction of するな ("do not"). Why is the て-form being used before ん? っつの (っつうの) is like "I say", "I said", "Hey", "Come on", etc. What does っつの mean? あんなの is "something/someone like that" with a derogatory nuance. あんなのと一緒にすんなっつうの。 (literally) Do not make [me/it] the same as that! Don't lump me in with that bastard! Come on, I'm not ...


1

いて is the て form of いる. いる→いて .


1

What do you mean by "name is shy"? 照れ屋さん means "a shy person" as a whole. 屋 is a suffix with various meanings, one of which is "person who tends to do ~" or simply "-er". Examples: 照れ屋: a shy person 頑張り屋: a hard worker 寂しがり屋: someone who gets lonely easily; someone who cannot stand alone 気取り屋: a smug person 分からず屋: a stubborn/hardheaded person This -さん has ...


0

I believe one can write a program to do this, but you can also estimate usage in the 2010s by using Table 5.9 of this book and assuming that the ratio of katakana to hiragana usage hasn't changed much since 1985 (hiragana remains dominant because most okurigana and particles are written in hiragana, although this assumption may underestimate % katakana ...


4

It's merely an incomplete sentence. It's indeed "If [I/you] die, I, I, ..." and nothing more. Maybe you missed the the remaining part of this sentence in the next page. Or maybe he was simply too upset or weak to finish this sentence. Or maybe he wanted to continue this sentence but was interrupted by another character. Usually something like 悲しいよ, 困るぞ or ...


1

The person is hesitant to finish the sentence. I have heard this in English my whole life. Books, movies; for dramatic effect. I've even done it myself. Maybe not say "I" twice but at least once and then not finish the sentence. What's strange about it?


4

In modern Japanese, we say 3時15分前 (さんじじゅうごふんまえ; 2:45) and 3時15分過ぎ (さんじじゅうごふんすぎ; 3:15). The latter is not very common because it's obviously redundant. There is no single word that can express 15 minutes. 刻【こく】 was indeed an old unit of time with several different definitions, but it usually corresponded to roughly 30 minutes in Japan. According to Wikipedia ...


3

I suggest to think the opposite things of "本番". The possible opposite words are like below. training (トレーニング) drilling (訓練) practice (練習) rehearsal (リハーサル) testing (テスト) As you may notice, these actions are not the real purpose of you generally. They are kind of acts toward a big goal. We call this goal "本番" in Japanese. Generally speaking, we don't ...


3

I did check this link: https://tsurineta.69moons.com/method-horsemackere-ukiduri/ It seems that 仕掛け refers to everything but the fishing rod.


6

Expanding on kandyman's answer. Origins of mukimuki: probably not German According to the Shogakukan Kokugo Dai Jiten (KDJ) entry here, the first cited textual instance of a word mukimuki is way back in the 700s in the Man'yōshū poetry anthology. This is much older than the German word Muskel ("muscle"), of which Mucki is a derivation. Per the Herkunft ("...


2

Although it is an interesting observation, it is unlikely to be anything more than a coincidence. There is an established theoretical body of literature on Japanese sound symbolism which takes into account things like phonoaesthetics. It seems that some onomatopoeic forms use particular combinations of consonants and vowels to convey a range of related ...


5

I believe this おめっち is singular "you" because this person is speaking to one person in front of him. おめ corresponds to お前. っち is probably a suffix explained here (oh, it's your question). おめっち is not common but I sometimes hear おれっち/おらっち, which means "I" rather than "we". And this からかわれている is not "から + 変われている" but the passive form of からかう. から meaning "...


2

申し訳ございません is more polite than 申し訳ありません, but both are very common. (In a store you might hear the former more often, since in this setting it's common for the salesperson to use the most polite form.) 申し訳ないです is also very common, but ないです is a more informal version of ありません that would be used in a more casual setting.


4

Yes, 申し訳ありません is perfectly natural. It's politer than すみません but less polite than 申し訳ございません. Hotel clerks may stick to 申し訳ございません, and you should use 申し訳ございません in a serious formal apology, too, but there are cases where 申し訳ありません is enough. EDIT: For example, if you're saying "I'm sorry" to your close boss in the same section, 申し訳ございません can be an overkill, and ...


5

Why would they say 次の週 instead of 来週? Because like the phrase next week in English, 来週 is generally assumed to be relative to the time when it is uttered. 来週は空いていますか。 Are (you) free next week? Is a question about whether someone is free in the next week after whenever it was asked. 来週 is not really used to talk about relative time in reference to ...


0

I echo comments that your translations are good. One footnote I might add for the first usage is that "分" is primarily used to refer to a part of the whole. So that line makes me wonder if there are other cardboard boxes that are not getting thrown away. If so, your translation might shift accordingly, say "is this the portion you want to throw away?" Some ...


12

This seems like the kind of question that should be answerable with simple dictionary lookups in English, but it doesn't actually seem to be. Jisho in particular does very little to disambiguate here. Fortunately, monolingual dictionaries are much more helpful. 「呟く」は、小さな声でひとりごとを言う意。聞き手は必要としない。一方、「囁く」は、周囲に聞こえぬよう、相手だけに小さな声で話す意。 「呟く」refers to talking ...


2

These verbs are both intransitive and transitive. You can say all of ~を怒鳴る, ~を怒鳴りつける, ~に怒鳴る and ~に怒鳴りつける. These are all very common and I don't think there is a large difference between ~を and ~に. You can check this using BCCWJ.


8

It seems the company called ドコデモ is a telecommunications company especially mobile network service. The company she works at should be a subsidiary company of ドコデモ. I am not sure what she is actually doing though, she might be responding the customers' request due to erratic connection all over the town. Anyway 傘下{さんか} literally means "under the umbrella". ...


5

I would say it not ambiguous. In this context, 良い所 definitely means "good point" and I never think of the other possibility. To talk about places, the interviewer would have used something other than 所, such as 場所, 風景, 街, 地域, スポット or 観光地. Well, "point" in English can also refer to a location (eg, rendezvous point, Cape point), but do you feel "Japan has some ...


2

Of course, by the context, it is pretty obvious the meaning is "points". But if the context was different, could it be about a place or is 良い所 an expression specifically related to good points or what is good about something? 良い所 itself has both meanings. See Meaning of ところ in アメリカのいいところ and in this case there's not much difference* between kanji and ...


1

That's true. ところ can refer to a "point" or "aspect" of a certain thing or person. In fact, one dictionary writes this: 2㋒ 部分。箇所。点。 「悪い―を直す」「粋な―のある人だ」


4

庭 refers to a (wide but usually enclosed) place adjacent to a house. Assuming your yard looks like this, 庭 refers to everything in this picture, including the brick-paved part. Your "garden" may be 花壇, 家庭菜園, 庭園, ガーデン or 植木 in Japanese. It's possible to explain the difference in sentences, but perhaps it's best to see images, so please check the links.


8

If you look up 落ち着き in a dictionary you can find definitions like "aplomb", "calm", "peacefulness" or "cool", but this is not how 落ち着き is used here. Here 落ち着き is simply the masu-stem of the verb 落ち着く, which can mean "to settle (down)" or "to finally end up". いろいろな議論があったが、リーダーは彼に落ち着いた。 There was a lot of discussion, but it was settled that he was the leader. ...


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