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4

Sometimes, loanwords sound simply cool and modern, and traditional words are too mundane or too direct. English speakers also have imported many new loanwords from foreign languages (café, siesta, kaizen, ...), but generally speaking, the influence that English has on other languages is much stronger than that in the opposite direction. Semantically, キッチン, ...


4

30 pages is long enough to be called a 物語, but note that its meaning is somewhere between "tale", "legend" and generic "story". If your story is something like Harry Potter or Titanic, it's safely a 物語. If it's a news story or someone's matter-of-fact success story, 物語 is probably not a suitable word.


4

First, 主【あるじ】 is not particularly gender-specific, but it's not a very common way of addressing one's master, either. It sounds relatively blunt and less sophisticated. If you want to play it safe, avoid aruji altogether. (It can be natural in some fictional situations, though. For example, one user of aruji I know is a young and proud beast girl who is ...


2

こき is the masu-stem of the verb こく, and こく should be in any dictionary. 扱く in Kotobank and jisho.org 放く in Kotobank and jisho.org こき in 嘘こき is masu-stem as a noun. Note that 扱く and 放く are different words although both are almost always written in hiragana.


2

As you have correctly inferred, 層 refers to a specific layer/tier/(sub)group of people, especially a group of consumers that share the same characteristics/interest in some market. For example, 任天堂は新しいファン層を開拓した means Nintendo has developed a new fanbase by releasing a type of game they had never created (perhaps you could say this referring to FE Heroes). ...


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In my own subjective experience, I've encountered 層【そう】 in reference to a "layer" of a particular demographic. We don't talk about demographics as "layers" in English, so it might sound a bit funny, but in your sample texts they're essentially talking about those specific groups of people who are 1) ardent fans of Nintendo, 2) difficult ...


2

I believe you may be confused with the similar words 家出{いえで} and 出家{しゅっけ} 家出: https://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/word/%E5%AE%B6%E5%87%BA/ Definition one here says 帰らない{かえらない}つもりでひそかに家を出ること。「都会{とかい}にあこがれて家出する」「家出人」. 'Secretly leaving home with no intention of returning'. The example sentences are 'Running away from home dreaming of city life', and 'a runaway'. 出家: ...


5

I wonder if it's this かたふり: 「かたふり」とは船員用語で、船内で気が合う仲間同士で部屋に集まり、コーヒーやお酒を飲みながら自慢話やよもやま話に話を咲かせることを言います。話に熱中してくると身振りが大げさになり、自然と肩が振れるようになるという説や船の揺れに合わせて雑談をするからという説もありますが、真偽は不明です。 Translated: かたふり is a word used by sailors. It means to gather with people you get along well with inside a room in a ship, drink coffee or alcohol, and boast or talk about various ...


5

Both meanings are common. To me, those two meanings are actually closely related. ざっくり or ザクッ is primarily an onomatopoeia for the coarse "friction" noise produced when you deeply cut fiber-rich objects (cabbages, pumpkins, thick cloths, etc), trample snow/gravel, or dig in the soil with a shovel. You can hear typical ざっくり sounds in this video. (By ...


3

https://search2.j-lyric.net/index.php?kt=&ct=2&ka=&ca=2&kl=宿命%28さだめ%29&cl=2 It's ateji, often found in lyrics. There are many lyrics that don't say how to read them, so there are actually more than this. Other common ateji https://www.google.co.jp/search?q=%22歌詞%22%22当て字%22


3

They are heterographic as you say, but not synonymous. Since you already have the meanings pretty much figured out, there is no need to go into detail. To sum, 暑い describes weather/environment/temperatures, while 熱い describes objects. When you hear or see 「あつい」, context often determines which word is used. The Venn diagram below, copped from Wikimedia, ...


0

To me that sounds like a speech pattern used for a young boy in fiction. The use of ボク, ~ね, and to some extent ええとね, as well as the bluntness (use of ~だ) are all common in manga/light novels for an innocent boy-type character to use. One example is from a video game series I played before: Shin Megami Tensei. In the game, all the enemies (demons) have speech ...


0

Unlike what textbooks say (which lacked evidence like statistics), in reality, men use (noun)ね, (noun)よ or の。, if not exactly the same as feminine language, especially in New Tokyo dialect, which is the virtual common language. His speech doesn’t sound feminine but just a person from Kanto speaking casually, though that’s to some extent stereotype itself. ...


0

It's a manga/anime expression (one can tell because it's extravagant). I think in this case, the speaker is saying even the baddies are living things, so they should be allowed to die and lie down (or lie down after they die) - rather than say converted into an undead, be displayed on a pike or something. It's hard to tell what was exactly meant because it's ...


3

The words you're having trouble with are 現場、目標地点、軽装 They're not difficult words, so if you didn't have any trouble with the rest of the sentences, I guess I won't need to say more.


2

「寸{すん}」as standardized in the Meiji era is about 3 cm in the International System of Units (SI.) 「胸三寸{むねさんずん}」means three 寸 (9 cm) into the chest, which is where the heart was thought to be. 「胸三寸に納める」literally means "to put away deep in the chest". This phrase according to デジタル大辞泉 means: 心の中にしまい込んで、顔にも言葉にも出さないでいる。胸三寸に畳む。「何もかも―・めておく」 Namely it ...


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If you want to shift the point-of-view to focus on them, you could describe them/their ability with 無双・無敵・無比. 無双の美女 → Girl/Woman of unequaled beauty 無敵のチーム → An unbeatable team 天下無比の歌手 → An unmatched singer


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