Hot answers tagged

10

反面 is literally "the other side (of a coin, etc)", so it's used to describe the two different sides of the same subject. 一方 is just like "on the other hand"; it is widely used to compare or contrast two different things which may or may not belong to the same subject. 彼は普段は優しい一方(で)、怒ると非常に怖い。: OK 彼は普段は優しい反面(で)、怒ると非常に怖い。: OK 東京は晴れている。その一方(で)、...


9

The translation you saw looks neither like the most natural translation nor like traditional subtitle translation practice. It's more like a translation that must make compromises with lip sync requirements (this scene?). Basically, Japanese (commercial) subtitle translation is the art of summary. 清水 (1992), titled 『映画字幕は翻訳ではない』 (Movie Subtitles Are Not ...


5

I think かわいい doesn't have a negative nuance even if it is used for adults. Not only Japanese elementary school students but also even Japanese adult women often use the word かわいい. Japanese people, especially women, say it to everything as a word of praise. They use it to things because of not only its superficial cuteness but also its interior cuteness and ...


5

彼は秘密を知られる It's the so-called 持ち主の受身(Possessor Passive?), a kind of 間接受身(Indirect Passive). [持ち主]が + [所有する物、体の一部など]を + 受身形の動詞 I think it's usually translated as "[Possessor] has [property, body part etc.] done". 彼の秘密が知られる His secret is known 彼は/が秘密を知られる He has his secret known (and he's inconvenienced) These basically have the same meaning, but ...


5

役回り is not necessarily negative, but it's something passive. 明鏡国語辞典 defines 役回り as: やく‐まわり【役回り】 役の回りあわせ。割り当てられた役目。 (※回り合わせ = twist of fortune) That is, you don't actively take some 役回り, but you passively (or sometimes randomly) end up being assigned to some 役回り. No one wants to actively take a bad role, so it is true that 役回り tends to refer to ...


5

大都市 is just a plain word "large city" that doesn't have a strict definition in Japanese. And the problem here is that 大 in 大都市 and 六大都市 are different in meaning. By saying N大[noun] with a number N, you mean "the N major [noun]s", where the 大 roughly means "important" in this formula. They are not necessarily "large" in measure or whatever. 世界三大料理 The ...


5

You aren't wrong that they could both be translated "Before going on a trip, I'm going to buy a ticket". But, there's a slight difference in context/nuance provided. 旅行の前にきっぷをかいます。really focuses on the action of buying a ticket. You will simply buy a ticket before you go on the trip. You aren't implying any sort of preparation. 旅行の前にきっぷをかっておきます。...


3

Today, 大都市 typically refers to large cities with at least 1M population, but the criterion is subjective and relative. There is no strict definition defined by a concrete number. When the term 六大都市 was determined by the government in 1922, Nagoya and Yokohama had only 0.4M people. 札幌 had only 0.1M people in 1922 but has 1.9M now. I believe most people don't ...


3

そっか is very casual, and it's clearly inappropriate in formal settings. On the other hand, なるほど is safe in business exchanges, but it can sound a little pompous. If a small kid said なるほど, it would sound funny. Both なるほど and そっか are used like "Aha, I (finally) got it!", but I feel そっか is mainly used when you have realized a bad thing, e.g., "Oooh, so I was ...


2

Your translation is correct. ばっかり (colloquialism for ばかり) in this sentence is indeed "only", and it's interchangeable with だけ here. It's だらけ that only means "so much/many of something". ばかり has a wider usage. 美しいものだらけだ。: OK, "so many beautiful things" 美しいものばかりだ。: OK, "(almost) only beautiful things", "so many beautiful things" 美しいものだけだ。: OK, "only ...


2

First of all, I appreciate that this is a difficult subject, not least because when trying to research it, in English, the terms "honorifics" "respectfulness" "formality" "politeness" etc. often get used differently by different people. I'll try to stick to your terminology, but apologies if I slip up! Your understanding is correct: you can't combine "...


1

「宿題をやらなかった。」means not only "I didn't do my homework",but also "I didn't have the intention to do my homework".And it also means "I'm saying just the fact that I didn't do my homework yesterday".So that words are used when you wanna say "I didn't do my homework,but I"ll do it today". 「しゅくだいをやりませんでした。」is polite version of 「宿題をやらなかった。」. 「しゅくだいをやっていない。」means "...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible