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5

In Japanese, it's perfectly fine to use この/そんな/あの/etc to modify 私/武蔵/etc., but it has a certain nuance. こんな私: a person like me (lit. "such I") この俺: a person like me / even I / me here / no one else but me この武蔵: I, Musashi / This person Musashi See this question for other possible translations. In your example, saying この武蔵 probably implies this ...


3

全然そう being marked as the theme of the sentence... You don't seem to be parsing the sentence correctly, I'm afraid. The 全然 continues to the negative ない in いかなかった. 「全然...ない」 means "not ... at all". For more on the usage of 全然+ない, see: The reason for using 何も+negative, but 何でも+positive 全然 {ぜんぜん} with positive adjective / na-adjective How to ...


2

The particle は adds sort of exclusivity in a negative sentence. For example, ビールは[飲]{の}まない。 implies this person might drink other alcoholic drinks, but not beer. ビール is singled out to stress that he doesn’t drink beer. On the other hand, ビールを[飲]{の}まない。 has no such implication. When it’s a verb that is to be singled out, it takes the following form: [V ...


2

It adds the sense that the action/state of the preceding verb (生きる) has continued till now. If you want to say you will continue living that way into the future, you can say ずっとボーッと生きていく.


2

そうだ can describe a subjective "hunch" about the future based on non-visual or vague information. From this page: 様態の「~そうだ」は主として視覚的印象(外見からの判断)を述べる助動詞ですが、(snip) 視覚でとらえられない動詞について漠然とした予想・予感の世界を表すようになります。(snip) まだ会議は始まりそうもないから、コーヒーでも飲んできましょう。 戦争はまだまだ続きそうですねえ。 ああ、寒い。風邪をひきそうだ。 この仕事は今日中に終わりそうです。 In such cases, there doesn't have to be objective ...


2

V(masu form)+そうだ means "one's own guess". V+ようだ means "an event or action that will happen with high probability because of very reliable information". For example, you can say 雨が降りそうだ when you see the cloudy sky, but it's only your guess. On the other hand, you can say 雨が降るようだ and you have already gotten the information from the weather ...


2

The feedback you got (and your interpretation thereof) is pretty much on point, I think. Indeed, くれる is a special/irregular verb, in that it doesn't have a passive form: "くられる" isn't recognized as an existing word; and in such cases もらう is used instead. 小学生の時に、お父さんにロッククライミングの仕方を教えてもらいました。 This sentence is correct, but while it does reduce the ...


2

How much does the sentence's meaning change if it weren't there? It would be slightly less emphasized. It's like the difference between appending "whatsoever" at the end or not in English.


1

This is the common grammatical structure that emphasizes an absence of [something]. 何{なん}の + [something] + も + [negative verb] For example, the opposite of「役に立つ」is「何の役にも立たない」, which means "useless" or "not helpful." Another example,「何の意味もない」means "devoid of meaning." Back to your question,「何の躊躇いもない」means "no hesitation.&...


1

You are correct, go with (b). 出たら would be "When you attend" 出るのなら would be "If you plan to attend" so, the latter is a better fit for "You better study ahead."


1

The second sentence (b) sounds natural, whereas the first (a) doesn’t, at least not for what you wanted it to mean. It would mean you would do 予習 at the class, which would be too late if it refers to preparations for that class.


1

I've also read that the te-form of intransitive verbs with いる describe a state that holds after said change occurs. As a native speaker, I can say that this definition is correct but too narrow in scope; the case you raised with 泣いている is perfectly valid. I would map "ている" to english persent-perfect form, "has been" "have been". ...


1

Keep in mind that the English is not a translation of the Japanese. The English is a translation from German. The Japanese is also a translation from the German. It may help having the English and Japanese side-by-side but don't rely on any deep correspondence there. It's important to realize that the reason why going back to sleep is impractical is given ...


1

いいように ように here means "in order to". So your second interpretation is correct. だけ vs だけは I personally don't differentiate between contrastive and topic marker for は, so I don't know how to answer that question but, だけ means "only", whereas だけは means "if nothing else". In this case, 高校だけ出ておきなさい would mean "Finish up to high ...


1

Without proper context, it is difficult to say, but it seems to me that a female character B said in her normal formal way "構いません" for the first time, but after reflecting (represented by the use of ...) on something dangerous she was going to do, she said again the same thing by using informal or impolite or manly phrase "構わない", in order ...


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