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3

かい is simply another version of the question particle か. You can read this post for details, but the main nuance is that you only use it when it's a yes and no question. You are correct for the meaning of てもらう and ため. The main subtlety here is that てもらう is used to request the ocean, not someone. The literal translation would be something like: "In ...


3

This is difficult partially due to the difficulty of differentiating dry up/wither/wilt/shrivel on my part, but here is a non-comprehensive answer. 枯れる means something completely dead. 枯れた花 is actually possible. The difference with 萎れた花 is that 萎れた花 may be just lacking some water. You can water it for the 萎れた花 to revive. I'm not sure how 'dried up' the ...


2

よこす is limited to when the speaker is the recipient of the item: this makes the word almost always used in a command form e.g. よこせ, よこしなさい. This is also because this word is considered rude/casual compared to the others, making it common for verbal demands. 渡す is the regular and neutral word for "to hand over", often used with polite forms お渡しする/...


2

I thought there was no sarcasm in Japanese lol. Anyway, this くれる is shortened from くれてやる, which is strong way of saying "あげる", so in this case that sentence is translated to "Today is the day I'm going to show you how horrible we are!"(I'm not sure if this is proper translation). Note that あげる is used for any circumstances but くれる is ...


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光る probably is the most neutral and can replace others in most cases. ピカピカ光る implies the light is on and off alternately. 輝く sounds brighter light, but not necessarily physically. It indicates that the speaker positively values the light. キラキラ輝く implies the changes in the intensity of the light, like ピカピカ光る. キラキラ光る is also possible. 光り輝く is used more in ...


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