31

In technical documents or technical news media, the name of a foreign website or company is typically written completely as-is. 米国Microsoft社のWindows 日本語についての質問サイトであるJapanese Language Stack Exchange Mass media for general public (e.g., 読売新聞) usually katakanize foreign proper nouns because many of their readers do not understand English at all: ...


23

「にほん で ぼく は しんかんせん を のります。」 is a nice attempt. I would, however, like to address two items here. 「のります」 simply means "will ride". If you want to say "want to ride", you might want to say 「のりたいです」. 「Verb in Continuative Form + たい」 means "to want to [verb]". 「のり」 is the continuative form of 「のる」. The next thing I need to point out is the particle ...


18

「先{さき}」 here means "the future", "the future events/developments", etc. 「先が気になる」 therefore means "(I am) curious about the future develpments". 「さき{HL}」 refers to a past event. 「先の国会{こっかい}」 ("the last national assembly") 「さき{LH}」 refers to a future event. 「先が気になる」 Native speakers would never say 「先が気になる」 to refer to a past event. We do say, however, 「...


15

「どうかと思う」 is a roundabout and indirect way of expressing one's somewhat negative opinion or impression of an action, situation, tendency, etc. It is indirect for using the word 「どうか」 ("how is it") instead of directly saying "I don't like it.", "I think it's bad.", etc. A more direct version of 「どうかと思う」 would be 「あまり感心{かんしん}しない」 ("I am not so impressed.") ...


14

Disclaimer - this is a simplified answer, but ... As with any language, you must differentiate between the actual sounds (phonology) and the writing system which represents the language (orthography). Although there are several thousand kanji characters which form the basis of the writing system (2136 on the official list), that doesn't mean there are ...


11

Here's a very simplified explanation: because the か makes it a question.


10

逃げられたの 彼氏に!! As you've noticed, this is an inverted word order of: 彼氏に逃げられたの 逃げられた here is Suffering Passive (迷惑の受身), which is a kind of Indirect Passive (間接受身). As you know, in passive sentences the agent (動作主) of the action is marked with に. eg お母さんが私を褒める → 私がお母さんに褒められる. Here the agent of 逃げる is 彼氏, hence: 彼氏が逃げた (active) My boyfriend ran away. → ...


8

そういう子なんだってだけで俺{おれ}が怒{おこ}ってもどうしようもない 「なんだって」 in this sentence is the informal form of 「なのだという」. Thus, in the first half of the sentence, someone is being described as 「そういう子なんだ/なのだ」 ("S/he is just that type of kid/person.") Having said that, this sentence can still mean two different things without further context. Those are: 1) "S/he is just that type ...


8

The amount of kanji is irrelevant because they are a writing system. The thing is that, when writing a foreign word in japanese, what happens is that the sound of the word is aproximated to the sounds available in the Japanese language, and then it can be written down using a Japanese syllabary such as hiragana or katakana (not Kanji). What you see in ...


7

おと (弟 or 乙 in kanji) is an archaic prefix meaning "younger/youngest (in a family, regardless of sex)" or "little lovely". From a 古語辞典: おと- 【弟・乙】 接頭語 ①〔人を表す語または人名に付けて〕年下の。末の。「兄(え)宇迦斯(うかし)・弟宇迦斯」。 ②〔人を表す語または人名に付けて〕美しい。愛する。年若い。かわいい。「弟橘比売命(たちばなひめのみこと)」 I don't know how common 乙嫁 was in real archaic Japanese, but the official site clearly says 乙嫁 in ...


6

「普通{ふつう}の人なら、あの​状況 {じょうきょう} ​ではまず間違{まちが}いなくパニックになるわ。」 「まず」, in this context, does not mean "first" as you stated. In Japanese, it is synonymous to 「おそらく」、「ほぼ」、「多分{たぶん}」. In English, it would be "for the most part", "likely", etc. Does まず denote a aspect of time, as in 'first (time)' in that situation? No, not in that context, as I briefly ...


5

「お父さんの無念{むねん}を引{ひ}き継{つ}ぎ糧{かて}にすることが出来{でき}る。」 = 「お父さんの無念を引き継ぎ、(それを)糧にすることが出来る。」  with 「それ」 referring to 「お父さんの無念」. 「糧{かて}」, in this context, roughly means "food for thought", "intellectual nourishment", etc. This is a very common usage of the word, too, besides its basic meaning of "burgers and fries" (j/k), the food with real calories. "I shall ...


4

This こと simply means "(intangible) thing". Simpler examples are: 悲しいこと sad thing / something sad 嬉しいこと happy thing / something happy 簡単なこと easy thing / something easy Likewise, 訳の分からないこと means "nonsensical/unreasonable thing", which is the object of the verb 言う. In case you don't know what this 訳の is doing, you have to analyze this part as a relative ...


4

First of all, your interpretation of 「ひざっこぞう」 is correct. ひざっこぞう = ひざこぞう = ひざ = most technically, ひざ頭{がしら} By adding the こぞう(小僧)= "a little boy", it personifies the word 「ひざ」 = "kneecap". Regarding the meaning of 「ひざっこぞうをたたいてみるよ」, I have always thought (in Japanese, of course, as I did not speak a word of English when this song came out) that it meant ...


4

Your translation of the first sentence is okay. 覚悟 means resolution, determination or mental preparation you make before facing some tough or risky situation. それが俺の覚悟だ (literally "That's my firm resolve") is basically saying he is determined to do it (crush'em all) no matter what, even though it may be followed by some bad consequence.


4

「連用形 (continuative form) of a verb + 終わる」 means "finish doing~~" "complete doing~~" "do ~~ to the end". e.g. 食べ終わる -- finish eating (≂ 食べ終える) 読み終わる -- finish reading / read to the end (≂ 読み終える) 観終わる -- finish watching / watch to the end (≂ 観終える) どうして観終わるまで席を立てるのかしら It's a rhetorical question (修辞疑問・反語). In the given context it means: "How can I leave ...


4

The kanji like 驪 or 闆 seem to be very rare and are unlikely to be known by a common person. You can notice that there are no entries for words containing those kanji, only some place/people names. While a somewhat unusual combination, I think 黒馬主 (kuro uma nushi) will be probably understood (note that it doesn't specify that the horse is male). In general,...


4

Welcome to Japanese stack exchange! Your understanding of the sentence is correct, though you should be sure to translate the が, as "but", which I think adds the contrast needed to make your sentence sound less "wonky"! The answer provided by the book is fine, too. か can be used between two nouns can mean "or", in an exclusive sense. As such, 「朝か晩に」 would ...


3

ちょっと腰のところを高くする ("to elevate one's hip/pelvis a bit") from the うつ伏しにのびきった ("flat prone") position should look like this: In a movie cut scene, we often see a dying person who doesn't have enough energy to stand or sit does this.


3

The word 戦前 normally refers specifically to the pre-WWII period. To say "before the battle", 戦闘前 or 戦いの前 is used. 戦前、 In the prewar period, 軍関連の場合は if an organization was military-related, 旭日旗を使うのが常識だったのでしょう。 I suppose the use of The Rising Sun (as the flag design of the organization) was taken for granted. Your rough understanding of the ...


3

Adding か to an interrogative pronoun, turns it into the Japanese equivalent of a "some~" pronoun: 誰【だれ】 who → 誰【だれ】か someone どこ where → どこか somewhere 何【なに】 what → 何【なに】か something So, if you remove the 何か from your sentence, it does not retain the same meaning because it would miss the "something" part. Let's compare: どこへ行きますか。Where do [you]...


3

「アラサーにもなれば彼氏{かれし}くらいいるものでしょ」 「くらい」, in this context, is nuanced. It does not mean "approximately", which the word most often means. Here. 「くらい」 means "at least" or "at the very least". 「いる」 means "to have", "to possess" here. For the 「ものでしょ」 part, you may want to read: The meanings of ものだ It is the second usage (general tendency) in this sentence. "...


3

どう can, colloquially, be used to express one's opinion of a thing being "questionable", or "dubious", without outwardly nor directly criticizing it either. It takes this meaning when used more "affirmatively" in the sentence, a bit like interrogative words may take a critical meaning when put in rethorical questions in a language like English. In other ...


3

ケタ is 桁 which in this context can be understood as "standard/norm" or "reference frame" and 外れ means something like it "falls out of the reference frame" — like when people use 120%. You can see how in some contexts this could be translated the way you listed (incredible, extraordinary, exceptional or phenomenal), but here it should probably be translated ...


3

The literal meaning of 流れるように is just "as if flowing" or "like a flow". The corresponding verb depends on the context, as shown below, but it's usually not 動く. This hashtag is far from popular (less than 100 tweets in the last 5 years), and apparently it is used in many different ways. You have to determine the meaning of 流れるように on a case-by-case basis, and ...


3

I think your interpretation of the sentence, a lone one/only one and that there is an inscription on a wall., is close. I think 「イタズラ書きだらけ」is compound. It is strange to drop one word in the phrase. So, do you want to parse the sentence a little bit for understanding the mix of ひらがな and カタカナ? ((イタズラ + 書き) + だらけ) + の + 壁 + に + ひとつ + の + 携帯番号。 イタズラ書き ...


2

It means he neither lives in a locker nor is a murderer but a normal employee. It may be clearer in this way. 彼はロッカーを棲家としているわけでもなく殺人鬼のはずもなく普通の正社員だ。 This is a long sentence. ロッカー means “locker” in this sentence because 棲家 means a place where someone lives. Perhaps ッ looked like ツ due to the font.


2

The Little Prince? I can't give you a grammatical explanation but it's the difference between: 1) 僕が六歳だったとき...すごい絵を見た。 When I was six I saw an amazing picture ... 2) 僕が六歳だったときのことだ。...すごい絵を見た。 It was when I was six. I saw an amazing picture... Unfortunately I'm having a hard time describing the difference between my English translations. I suppose ...


2

棒立ち literally means "standing (like a) stick", and its implication is "uselessly standing still without doing anything else". "In fear" is a translator's addition, but I think it's not spot-on because the children don't seem to be afraid in particular.


2

Since the topic is TV series, in this case it refers to the future [episodes]. E.g. “(Very) curious about what happens next” “Can’t help thinking about the next episode”


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