24

Since this is a formal statement, it's better to keep 私の. But people can understand the sentence without it because they know it's your profile. What's worse about your sentence is that your sentence has a number of bad word choices and grammatical errors. 生むています is always ungrammatical. The te-form of 生む is 生んで. There is a subject-predicate mismatch. ...


10

The translation you saw looks neither like the most natural translation nor like traditional subtitle translation practice. It's more like a translation that must make compromises with lip sync requirements (this scene?). Basically, Japanese (commercial) subtitle translation is the art of summary. 清水 (1992), titled 『映画字幕は翻訳ではない』 (Movie Subtitles Are Not ...


8

気にかける is a set phrase which means "to care about", "to worry about". 一切 (+ ない) is "(not) at all". This 一切 is a stiff negative polarity item that works like まったく. よう + と + する is "to try to do ~", and なさる is an honorific version of する. など and も are for emphasis. 人の批難を気にかける: to worry about other's criticism 人の批難を気にかけようとする: to try to worry about other's ...


8

ゴクリ (ごくり) is an onomatopoeia for swallowing down something once, in this case, saliva (*gulp*). It is used to suggest that someone sees something "tasty", or holds breath expecting something. Written in halfwidth katakana in the end of a sentence because it is a long-standing format for short text elements in Japanese memes. While the onomatopoeia has many ...


7

「グジュグジュ」 is indeed an onomatopoeia describing something being wet, watery, damp, etc. (often, if not always, in a grubby way.) Onomatopoeias often have numerous variants: therefore, many of them cannot be found in dictionaries. We also say 「グチュグチュ」、「グショグショ」、「グチョグチョ」, etc. Here, it is talking about the inside of a dog's ears by using the onomatopoeia. ...


7

"It's a long sentence so I'm having trouble." Long sentences are not too often used in manga. Sentences just tend to "look" long to Japanese-learners because there are practically no punctuations used in manga. 「日数{にっすう}」 simply means what the two kanji would suggest -- "the number of days". Thus, 「[出席]{しゅっせき}日数」 means "the (total) number of days ...


7

"The only thing more troubling than the silence were the whispers that followed." ​沈黙 {ちんもく} ​より​悩 {なや} ​ましいのは​継 {つ} ​ぐささやきだけだった。 ​沈黙 より​悩 ​ましいのは​継 ​ぐささやきしかなかった。 Your grammar is good, period. It is the couple of word choices that would need to be improved -- 「悩ましい」 and 「継ぐ」, especially the latter. (I will be discussing yet ...


6

In gambling, 「張{は}る」 indeed means "to place one's bet". See definition #24 in デジタル大辞泉, which says: 24 賭(か)け事などに金銭をかける。「相場を―・る」 「賭{か}け事{ごと}」 means "gambling". Next, an explanation of the "verb + た" to express an order/request might be in order (no pun intended) as that is not something I have heard too many Japanese-learners use. This た is not the past-...


5

より is a comparison target marker. より can directly follow a verb/adjective, for example, 作るより食べる方が好きです ("I like eating more than preparing food"), ないよりある方がいい ("Having some is better than having nothing."). So 知らないより literally means "rather than not knowing", "compared to his not knowing (my true self)". 私のみっともない所見せられたから... ...because I was able to show ...


5

First, it's two sentences, although periods are omitted. 京都人は「死ねどす」なんて言わない。殺した後に「死んではるわ」って言う。 Kyoto people don't say "Die!" (to someone). (Instead,) They say "Oh this person is dead" after killing them. I think you can get the main part of this joke from the translation. Basically this is an ethnic joke that is making fun of the cold and sarcastic ...


5

The sentence can be changed to ドイツ語で読んだことがある本. の is used as a subject marker in some cases. したことがある means "have experience in doing", and present perfect tense is used for it such as "Have you been to Japan?(日本に行ったことがありますか?). ドイツ語で読んだことがある本 is a relative clause. It is translated as "The book that you have read before in German". It means almost the same ...


5

As @BJCUAI pointed out in the comment, まじでおまえに愛される気しかねぇんだけど(男です) is intended to be a creative reply referring to a line of the lyrics in the video: まじで僕に愛される気あんの? which is already an untypical, creative wording. 気あんの is the contraction of 気(が)ある "be willing to" + の? (question), but 気がある usually means that you have active desire to do something, while ...


4

向こう側 refers to a place beyond some landmark, e.g., 虹の向こう側 "somewhere over the rainbow", 地平線の向こう側 "a faraway place beyond the horizon". Judging from the explanation of the book of the same title (NSFW), this word seems to figuratively refer to an extremely fetish interest of 僕, a person who has "gone too far" in terms of sexual interest. I don't know what the ...


4

Since シン is written in katakana, the meaning is not very clear even to a native speaker who sees this title. Under the hood, this シン has multiple meanings by intention. According to this article: タイトルは庵野秀明総監督(55)が「新」「真」「神」などさまざまな意味を込めて命名。 Director Hideaki Anno gave the title due to the variety of meanings シン conveys, such as "new" (新), "true" (真), ...


3

I think your choice of "clear" is fair. This 綺麗 means "well-formed; matching the prescriptive form (which gives a stylish impression)". You can see some cognitive relation with "beautiful" or "tidy" sense as well. "Clean" that @EiríkrÚtlendi suggested is equally good. 綺麗なコード clean (source) code 綺麗な六角形 perfect hexagon 綺麗なイギリス英語 clear British accent


3

直さないのか直せないのか、 (I don't know) whether I won't fix it (=my bad habit described as follows) or I cannot fix it, (but) ... This part is a comment that can be understood independently. ~が本当にダメ人間。 I am a terribly useless person because of ~. ~ indicates I am a really hopeless person. ~ is why I call myself a useless person. This part is a little ...


3

紗月ちゃんは子供がいないだけマシかもね... Your situation may be better than mine because you don't have a child... ただでさえ子供みたいなのがもっとそう見えてくるから (I'm saying this) Because (if you had a child,) the one who is already like a child would look more so. → Your childish husband will start to look even more childish (if you have a real child, because, unlike our ...


3

グジュグジュ is a mimetic word that describes a wet and dirty/messy/sticky thing. Examples of グジュグジュな things include: handkerchief soaked with sweat face soaked with tear and snot rotten tomato infected wound


3

It means "(顔に)目(が)ついてるのか". る change to ん , which is a colloquial way. 目ついてんのか implies that you seem not to have eyes and seem to be able to see nothing. This phrase is very rude and used to revile someone. For example, when a person bumped into someone on the street, he may say it with anger, then they may fight.


3

This sentence "A is jealous of B" is translated as "AはBが羨ましい", "AはBに嫉妬する" and "AはBを羨ましがる.". So your sentence is unnatural.


3

I'm not late. I'm just early for tomorrow.   は、日本語にすると、 遅刻じゃないよ。明日の{[授業]{じゅぎょう}/[仕事]{しごと}etc.}に早めに来ただけ。 というような意味だと思います(...が、違うでしょうか?) または、 遅刻じゃないよ。明日に[備]{そな}えて、早めに来ただけ。 とかはどうでしょう?


3

I agree with you that this sentence is a bit hard to follow, but the only reasonable reading is that this オッサン refers to himself. The sentence contains a few nuanced words: いい歳(年): a fixed phrase that can be understood "an age that is old enough", but you can take that the whole wording 「いい年して」 corresponds to "despite one's age" (see What is the meaning of ...


3

I think summer project is a good working translation. The dictionary entry suggests it could be literally anything you've done of your own initiative and have achieved, but I did a google search, and there are mainly results for arts & crafts-y type things in the summer e.g. some young children doing calligraphy, some older children doing painting, this ...


2

This ノリ is a slangy term, and it corresponds to the fourth definition here: "(getting into the) mood; (entering into the) spirit; energy; enthusiasm; rhythm; feeling". So ノリが悪い is more about one's vibes, atmosphere, etc. Simply put, by ノリが悪い, the girl is saying her friend seems bored and not energetic when they are together. 付き合いが悪い is relatively more ...


2

My Japanese girlfriend once wanted me to translate some of these kinds of funny quotes. I translated them the same way you're trying to do, but all I ever got was confused looks. It's really hard to get this sort of humor across, since it doesn't exist in Japan. But if you really want a fitting translation, I'd go with 遅れてないよ?明日のために早めだよ~ ため does not only ...


2

This ほじくり返す is "to bring up again" or "to rehash" rather than "to disclose". Without more context, this sentence sounds to me like the girl is going to talk about the senpai's embarrassing past until he/she gives up. If it still doesn't make sense, please share more context.


2

I think your first translation is right and thinking B quote himself is strange. Your translation of A is I think perfect. We fought only three times. I think key is 〜してたくせに. In conversation, This phrase is mostly used to quote and criticize other’s behavior . and I also think you can deduce the person who said「もうやめてくれ」from context. In this sentence, A ...


2

「武器{ぶき}やったらなんでも売{う}ってるで、金塊次第{きんかいしだい}やなあ!」 This is Kansai speech. やったら = だったら ≒ なら 売ってるで = 売ってるよ やなあ = だなあ Highly literal TL: "If it's about weapons, I sell everything; It (what you can get) would all depend on the gold nuggets (that you have)." More naturally: "When it comes to weapons, I've got it all. Money will talk."


2

Horseshoes hadn't be used until Meiji in Japan, naturally no specific word for the horseshoe-tossing game. You can just literally say 蹄鉄投げ. FYI in the video game Rimworld, an item horseshoes pin is translated 輪投げのピン "hoop toss pin" which sounds way more familiar than the horseshoes, though the description and the graphic clearly tell that it's actually ...


1

The verb that corresponds to 背を is 見ろ. He rephrased 俺 with a more concrete and dramatic phrase, 世界のすべて城砦に抱く英雄たる男の背. Since this is not in a casual situation, I feel を is missing before 城砦, but it may be possible if this is recited in a verse-like way. So the "plain" version of this sentence is: 世界のすべてを城砦に抱く英雄たる男の背を見ろ! Behold the back of the man (=俺), ...


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