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6

「インターネットで注文{ちゅうもん}したセーターは、実際{じっさい}に着{き}てみるまでサイズが_____が、ちょうどよかった。」 A. 合{あ}わなかった B. 合うかどうか知{し}らなかった C. 合わないかもしれない D. 合うか不安{ふあん}だった First of all, A and C are out of the question as neither one logically fits the context. From my personal experience with Japanese-learners, I know many of them would think B was correct, but it is not. B is "...


5

As @BJCUAI pointed out in the comment, まじでおまえに愛される気しかねぇんだけど(男です) is intended to be a creative reply referring to a line of the lyrics in the video: まじで僕に愛される気あんの? which is already an untypical, creative wording. 気あんの is the contraction of 気(が)ある "be willing to" + の? (question), but 気がある usually means that you have active desire to do something, while ...


4

It's an onomatopoeiac phrase, that's meant to convey a menacing aura (like a thudding background noise). It gained particular prominance in the manga "Jojo's Bizarre Adventure" where it was possibly the most common sound effect. Since then, it's become a meme to use the sound effect in a font similar to the one in Jojo's to make people appear more menacing. ...


4

やめにしいな is a way of saying "stop!" in Kansai-ben. 止め【やめ】 + に + する is a set phrase meaning "to cancel", "to stop", "to give up", "to quit", etc. Here its object is 自分をごまかすの ("deceiving yourself"). しい (also written as しー, しぃ) is a Kansai-ben version of しろ. For example, 早くしろ/早くしな ("Hurry!") becomes はようしい. See: What is the meaning of 「まちいな」? ...


4

The word ashita is purely Japanese. The spelling 明日 comes from Chinese. A note about reading types For any word where the reading is the 訓【くん】読【よ】み, the word itself as pronounced is (almost always) from a native Japanese root. In these cases, it's important to recognize that the spelling and the underlying Japanese word are independent: the written form ...


3

The kanji 応 in 応募 means "to respond", and 募 here means 募集 ("recruitment", "public request for application"). Therefore, 応募 is used only for something that is publicly "called for", such as a job recruitment, a competition, an audition, a volunteer activity, or a magazine sweepstakes. There is usually a selection process, and you usually don't have to pay ...


3

原作を消化する normally means "to consume/finish the (large amount of volumes of the) original (comic) version", i.e., "to read (up)". It corresponds to "to deal with a large amount of task" in the dictionary. But if you heard it out of nowhere in a next episode's preview of an anime, I think it's a metafictional joke, like "we're going to make/show the anime ...


2

Let's look at the pieces of your phrase. 日【ひ】 is just "day", pretty straightforward there. 跡【あと】 is the "afters" of something, "leftovers" or "marks" or "scars", the impact or effect made by something. → so 日【ひ】の跡【あと】 parses out to "the aftereffects or marks left by the day". ささくれ is the noun or stem form of the verb ささくれる ("to split finely from the ends"). ...


2

This ノリ is a slangy term, and it corresponds to the fourth definition here: "(getting into the) mood; (entering into the) spirit; energy; enthusiasm; rhythm; feeling". So ノリが悪い is more about one's vibes, atmosphere, etc. Simply put, by ノリが悪い, the girl is saying her friend seems bored and not energetic when they are together. 付き合いが悪い is relatively more ...


2

I would say that this isn't actually a case of one word with two readings, as you've suggested, but of two different words that are written in the same way. That distinction may seem trivial, but if you look up the two words in a good Japanese dictionary, it quickly becomes apparent that it is not. 大辞林 defines 入り{はいり}込む{こむ} as follows: 中にはいる。奥深くはいる。 「...


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