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11

Short Answer: お辞儀: a bowing gesture 敬礼: a saluting gesture (this) 礼儀: courtesy; manner 礼: 1) =お辞儀; 2) =礼儀; 3) word of thanks; 4) token of gratitude, favor given in return 会釈: a casual, shallow and silent bow 一礼: a suru-verb, "to bow (once, casually)"; rarely used as a regular noun (船首: the bow of a ship (this)) お辞儀 is a plain term that refers to ...


8

学園 is commonly translated as "Academy". Basically it is nothing more than a naming convention which is arbitrarily adopted for the names of some schools (including 中学校, 高校, 大学, 予備校 and 塾). So all schools called 学園 are technically also 学校, but the opposite is not true. As a minor exception, 学園 is found in some place names of science parks and ...


4

It depends on the context: 帰る is usually used when returning to one's own house/home/homeland, whereas 戻る is used when returning to a place that isn't those things.


4

First, 言う/言います usually sounds like it's about something habitual or something in the future. In this case, you have to use the progressive form and say 言っている or 言っています (see this). Most of the time, you can simply omit the subject and say 〇〇と言っています. Alternatively, you can change the subject and say ~さんは〇〇と言っています (if you know the speaker) or この人は〇〇と言っています (if ...


3

Hmm, today, 食べ倒す is used almost exclusively in the sense of 徹底的に食べる. You can use Google to confirm this fact. くいだおれ太郎, a symbol of Osaka, has nothing to do with crimes, either. (飲み倒す is rarer but it's still used in the sense 徹底的に飲む.) The normal word to refer to dine-and-dash in modern Japanese is 食い逃げ (noun) or 無銭飲食. According to デジタル大辞泉, 食い倒す does mean the ...


3

This 式 on its own has a meaning of "manner" or "style". It is a common suffix used with a noun. ねずみ算 is just a noun, and 式 turns it to a no-adjective. Usage of the suffixes 流, 風, 式, 的 and 様 What does 五月雨式 means in this sentence? I'm wrestling with the first って in 借金が雪だるま式に増えてってるって噂だよ


3

The ど in どの is actually part of the so-called ko-so-a-do (こそあど) group of words, known as demonstratives. They connect with other morphemes to make words such as これ・それ・あれ・どれ, ここ・そこ・あそこ・どこ, and also your example, この・その・あの・どの, among others. The ど is the interrogative of the group, always asking a question like 'which', 'where', etc. どの on its own means 'which (...


1

I think you're right that it's not the potential form of the godan verb 危ぶむ. However, the verb 危ぶむ has two forms (from 大辞林): 一( 動マ五[四] )(godan/yodan) ..... 二( 動マ下二 )(shimo nidan) 危ない状態にする。 「国家を-・めんとする物/平家 5」 In particular, the second definition is a shimo nidan verb, which is related to the modern-day ichidan verb. We can look here for how a shimo nidan ...


1

I think a little more context for that sentence would help, but basically this is the noun 落とし followed by a form of the phrase ~甲斐{かい}がある, which means 'be worthwhile'. It's an N2 grammar point (see here). The かい part often becomes がい due to rendaku. That is why it is がい in おとしがい. As for 落とし, one meaning is 'getting someone to like you romantically'. I'm ...


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