Hot answers tagged

18

Though 温度 is a generic word for temperature, we prefer the specific 気温 "air temperature" everyday when we mention the weather, in conversation or in forecast. Same for 水温 of water, 体温 of body, 室温 of room etc. Especially, it'd almost sound like a joke if you described someone 温度が低い instead of 体温が低い (a languid person??). In my impression, 温度 is only preferred ...


17

I do not know of a monolectic term for that though there might exist one. The polylectic term that should be understood by virtually all adult native Japanese speakers would be 「日本語{にほんご}からの借用語{しゃくようご}」. By inserting 「[language name] + における」 in front of the term above, you can safely and unambiguously say "word(s) borrowed from Japanese (used in [language ...


13

麦酒 is no longer used, although it remains in some company names (example). 青空文庫全文検索 provides the frequency data based on the birth year of authors. According to this and this, 麦酒 was a less common alternative for ビール already before WWII. 麦酒 dropped out of use somewhere after WWII (I think it's very soon after WWII; my grandfather in his nineties uses ビール).


12

As for pizza, 枚 always stands for a whole round pizza. Each cut slice is counted with 切【き】れ (一【ひと】切れ, 二【ふた】切れ...). (top: ピザ 一枚, bottom: ピザ 一切れ)


12

check out this excerpt from 大辞林第三版 on ませ ませ( 助動 ) 〔丁寧の助動詞「ます」の命令形〕 ① 「いらっしゃる」「おっしゃる」「くださる」「なさる」「申す」「召す」などの動詞の連用形に付いて,相手に対して,その動作をするようにという要求を,丁寧の気持ちを含めて言い表す。 「くれぐれも御自愛くださいませ」 「十分お気をつけなさいませ」 ② 挨拶(あいさつ)の語句に用いて,語調を丁寧にする。 「お帰りなさいませ」 〔② は,元来,「よくお帰りなさいました」のような言い方の省略した形「お帰りなさい」を,命令の言い方と混同して,それに「ます」の命令形「ませ」を付けて,丁寧な気持ちを添えようとしたところからできたもの〕 → まし(助動) ・ ます(助動) We ...


11

counters are based on size and shape of physical items I'm not sure what you mean by this, but not really --- I'd say we choose counters based upon what we perceive the object to be. So, for ebooks (as in Kindle), 冊 is used. When you see an object in immersive VR, corresponding counter for that object in real world is used. (On the other hand, developers ...


11

「こんばんみ」 is a greeting presumably created and definitely made popular by comedian ビビる大木 a couple of decades ago. As always, some people like to mimic whatever schtick they hear on TV that they find "cool" or simply "new". 「こんばんみ」 was even more popular a decade or two ago than it is now. I was a bit surprised to hear you still hear/see it often enough. ...


9

何それ? is not necessarily rude, but it is certainly informal. As such, it should probably only be used with friends or family or in an informal environment. Using it outside those boundaries might risk it sounding somewhat brusque or perhaps even rude. A standard polite alternative is: それは何ですか。 What is that?


8

I assume that you're referring to「缶」- it's not pronounced as in English, but an on'yomi (and also a word used in Chinese). This is a bit hard to see in the shinjitai form. In kyūjitai, the kanji is「罐」.「罐」is made up of semantic「缶」(picture of a jar/pot) and phonetic「[雚]{かん}」, which occurs in many characters as a sound component: [觀]{かん} (Shinjitai: 観) [權]{けん}...


7

After googling about a bit, I hit on a likely thread. I suspect that the actual message is something like the following. The piece that you specifically mention is in bold. お掛【か】けになった電話【でんわ】は電波【でんぱ】の届【とど】かない場所【ばしょ】にあるか​電源【でんげん】が入【はい】っていないため​かかりません。 Breaking down the translation of the bolded portion: 電源【でんげん】  が 入【はい】っていない ため power [SUBJ] in   ...


7

As said in l’électeur’s answer, it’s far more likely that you’d use some longer phrase to describe such a word. However, it seems like there is some currency for the term 「外行語{がいこうご}」, born as a reversal of 外来語. It doesn’t show up as in option in my kanji completion list, and its usage seems fairly minimal, but it is intuitive enough (written, not so much ...


7

I think you could use [餌]{えさ}. あなたの猫はどんな餌を食べますか? or more simply... あなたの猫は何を食べますか?


7

Simply, you can use 非【ひ】ネイティブ or 非ネイティブスピーカー.


6

Are you looking for a medical (psychiatric) term, or are you looking for a word laypeople know? Anyway, candidates include: 白昼夢: "daydream"; a dream seen while awake 夢想(的): "dream; vision"; basically a stiff kango version of 夢 幻覚(的): "hallucination"; a psychiatric term known to laypeople; usually not associated with fantastical elements or decreased ...


6

It depends on the context. さくじつ and きのう both mean yesterday (and the same Kanji 昨日 is used for the words). A major difference in their usage is that さくじつ is almost always used in a formal context (written and spoken), while きのう is often used both in formal and informal contexts (written and spoken): Using さくじつ in a casual conversation seems weird. You can ...


6

「この際{さい}だからちゃんと話{はな}すという手も」 is a valid and natural-sounding "sentence" as-is in informal and/or spoken Japanese. That it lacks a verb at the end should not surprise you if you are someone who has already been watching anime in the original Japanese. The verb phrase that is left unsaid at the end would be 「ある」、「あると思{おも}う」、「あるんじゃない?」、「あるでしょう」, 「あるよね」, etc. ...


5

割り箸 are disposable (usually wooden) chopsticks you will get in a restaurant. They are made from one piece of wood. You will have to break them (割る) into their two parts to use them. 箸 is the general term.


5

設定 in this context is "(character) settings", i.e., how the author characterize a person in the plot. Normally, a character in a story don't talk about his own 設定, but this may be some sort of metafictional joke. ギリギリ is an adjective that literally means "nearing the borderline/edge/extremity". In this context, the character is talking about the borderline ...


5

I guess your trouble amounts to the difference between 病気【びょうき】 and 病【やまい】. In modern Japanese, yamai is a grandiose word that usually refers to serious, often life-threatening diseases. The duration is not important because many serious yamai are acute (like acute brain strokes). On the other hand, byoki is a generic and casual term for sickness/illness/...


5

Background The first thing to be aware of is that this poem was composed in Chinese by the poet 于 濆 (Yú Fén) in roughly 874. (Brief Chinese Wikipedia article about the poet here.) As such, the Japanese version must be viewed as a translation. And if you've ever done much translation yourself, particularly of poetry, you've probably come to understand ...


4

It might not be common that a large manufacturer like Asahi making beer whose name contain 麦酒{ばくしゅ}. I think there are some microbrewery in Japan making craft beer whose name contain "麦{ばく}酒{しゅ} or the company name contains 麦酒{ばくしゅ} such as the company 「日本語: 北海道麦酒醸造株式会社, 英語: "HokkaidoBrewing"」. I think you often can buy 「小樽麦酒{おたるばくしゅ}」by the company at ...


4

祭り refers to festivals in general; it can refer to all sorts of festivals all over the world, religious or non-religious. カーニバル specifically refers to carnivals celebrated in Christian countries, or events derived from that. It's also commonly associated with Samba since Rio's Carnival is world-famous. Japan is not a Christian country, so there is no ...


4

Firstly, お開きにしましょう means "let's wrap it up" not "let's get started." I guess you can kind of think of it as the people are going to spread out and move away. I'm not sure of the full etymology. Therefore #2 is the most appropriate, and #3 would be the complete opposite. Option #1 would be kind of a strange interaction. A: "Let's wrap things up now" ...


4

From my experience, サッカー is almost exclusively used to refer to the one you use your foot for most of the time, and アメフト for the handegg version. As some fun examples of usage, you might want to check NFL Japan's site or read some of Murata Yusuke's Eyeshield 21.


4

絶滅: "extinction (of species)"; a kango technical term used only in biological contexts 消滅: "disappearance", "vanishing"; a kango used with various subjects in various technical/legal/academic contexts 賠償を請求する権利が消滅した。 台風は上陸する前に消滅した。 When someone says 消滅した種族, I would say it probably refers to a vanished (ethnic) tribe, because 絶滅 is the normal term ...


4

This 線 refers to a possible way of thinking, a possible solution (among others), an approach, etc. This is often used in detective stories. 物事を行う道筋・方針。「その線で交渉しよう」 (デジタル大辞泉) 物事を行う上での(漠然とした)方針や道筋。「その線で考えてみよう」(明鏡国語辞典 第二版) 8. line (of action); position; approach; policy; principle (jisho.org)


4

Should it be "pepa kai", "kami kai" or something else? I think that you are going to get a variety of answers. I think that in this case, you will actually be better using the katakana version of the English phrase 'Paper World,' which is ぺーパーワールド. Using the Japanese 界 may be confusing, as かい (kai) could be interpreted as one of many things, including ...


4

If this "Paper World" is an existing Western company name, you usually have to leave it untranslated or use katakana ペーパーワールド. (Note that there is already a company with the same name.) Unlike Chinese which tries to convert every foreign name into kanji, Japanese people usually just use Latin alphabet or katakana for branding of foreign names. You should not ...


4

This is just the expansion of my comment, but I can suggest an alternative way of translation of world as 国 ("land; country; kingdom"), if you only mean that "a place where things of a kind gather". While 世界 is the likely translation for that word in most cases, it bears a nuance of a "self-contained environment" that has its own collection of history, ...


4

仕入れる also means 'to gain new information that may be useful' and て来る(てくる) is called a kind of subsidiary verb - in this context, it means 'to get back after doing something'. Actually in this situation, this て来る doesn't have much meaning because B just wanted to emphasize WHERE A heard that story. So 'どこで仕入れたんだそんなような話' is almost the same as the original ...


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