Hot answers tagged

9

In modern Japanese, 邂逅 is a する-verb (which are also known as サ変), but in classical-esque Japanese the する becomes す (see 愛する vs 愛す etc). The し comes from the 連体形 (form used to connect to nouns such as 瘴炎) of the auxiliary particle き, which is a particle that is well known for having crazy conjugation patterns. き is used similarly to how た is used in modern ...


5

You can say 百七十ちょい (very casual), 百七十ちょっと (casual), 百七十あまり and 百七十強(きょう) (formal). You can also say 百七十幾つ(ひゃくななじゅういくつ) and 百七十幾ら(ひゃくななじゅういくら), but you cannot use a counter (e.g., 通) with them. 百七十数通(ひゃくななじゅうすうつう) is also acceptable, but it's less common than the others presumably because 170 is already specific enough. 百数十通 is common (roughly between 110 and ...


5

This may be the first time an answer to a question on this site was "the automatic translation got it right". However, this time the automatic translation did get it right. 偽 is a fairly common prefix that can be attached to other words to mean a fake version of that thing, although it has slightly broader applications than the English word fake and can ...


4

It technically means both, but is mainly used for the flat space on top of a building. For the other meaning, you can say 屋根の上.


4

I don't see any deeper nuance to the phrase 身を包む. It literally means 'to wrap yourself up', or in other words 'to wear'. To me, it simply conveys that they were dressed in uniforms. You don't mention the source but I am assuming it is from a novel perhaps? As with English, writers often use alternative ways to express something if they feel it is too prosaic....


4

This を is still an object marker, but the corresponding verb is omitted because it can be inferred from the context. This happens very often in slogans, headlines and lyrics. You can see some examples here: Does the particle "を" (wo) have a special use when at the end of a sentence? Is it a right interpretation of the line of this Japanese song? ...


4

本番 is a little difficult to translate, but it refers to an "actual", "real", "live" or "production" part of something, as opposed to rehearsal, testing or preparatory parts. Thus IT社長は女優と付き合ってからが本番だ (lit. "For IT presidents, 本番 comes after he dates an actress") means the presidents of IT companies are not "real" (or successful) presidents until he starts to ...


4

一通り (adverb, no-adj) means "all, although briefly". For example, 一通り理解している means one has a rough understanding of the entire topic. Your sentence means he got a brief explanation of the entire campus enough to get started. It doesn't necessarily mean every single building was explained, but it at least means important ones were explained. From 明鏡国語辞典 第二版: ...


4

Both hiragana and katakana are derived from manyogana. Manyogana were the kanji characters used to write Japanese phonographically in early writing after the characters were imported from Chinese. The kanji 平 can also have the meaning of 'ordinary' (definition in Japanese). So it is a way of describing 'ordinary script' or, in other words, simplified ...


4

You may have known「軽{かる}い」and 「身軽{みがる}」can both be translated as "light". However, they are used in different situations. 「軽{かる}い」is not so different from "light" in English and normally used to describe things have the nature of having little weight. It can be quantitatively measured by weighing scales. 「身軽{みがる}」is, however, often used in a metaphorical ...


4

For the difference between うち and いえ, please see: What is the difference between いえ and うち? 宅【たく】 is not used as a standalone noun. This kanji is used mainly as part of longer compounds such as 自宅, 邸宅 or 宅地. Or did you hear お宅【おたく】? お宅 is an honorific expression used to refer to someone else's home respectfully. お宅 is also a blunt and/or nerdy second-person ...


4

I believe Japanese children do not use special mnemonics. I mastered the sequences of あかさたなはまやらわ, いきしちにひみいりい, うくすつぬふむゆるう, えけせてねへめえれえ and おこそとのほもよろを using the latter half of this children's song (written by a famous poet), and this was probably when I was a kindergartner. I still clearly remember these five sequences almost like standard words, although I ...


3

Off the top of my head, 約【やく】170 大雑把【おおざっぱ】に170くらい 170あまり (implies slightly more than 170) 170弱【じゃく】 (implies slightly less than 170) アバウト170 (just kidding)


3

I checked two corpora: 青空文庫全文検索 (includes public domain literary works roughly in 1850-1950) BCCWJ (includes contemporary Japanese text in 1970-2005) According to the former, 滑り出す as an ordinary compound verb ("to start to slide/slip") has been commonly used regardless of the age. But as an idiomatic noun meaning "beginning", its first appearance was in ...


3

「あの店は今、3割引のセールをしています。」"I suspect it means 30% , but maybe it means 33.3% which is 1/3?" "In any case I don’t understand the logic behind this." According to コトバンク, etymologically speaking,「割{わり}」comes from「把利・和利」 which was used for the unit of tax.「把」 was defined as 1/10 of a bundle of rice harvest and some「把」was paid to the mayor. I am not sure where 「和利」 ...


2

あの店は今、3割引のセールをしています。 I suspect it means 30% , but maybe it means 33.3% which is 1/3? Your suspicion is correct. わり and わりびき should be in the dictionary. In any case I don’t understand the logic behind this. One wari = ten percent. How would you say if the discount rate was 3% instead? さんパーセントオフ


2

The programming group that wrote the censoring algorithm probably don't have native English speakers on board, either that or their voices are simply blatantly ignored. have => h__v : "av" is abbreviation for adult video nice => n___ : "ice" is another name for crystal meth. future => __t__e : "fu" = f__k you, not so sure about "ur" though. From ...


2

幼女趣味/幼女好き: 幼女 refers to small girls (around 3 to 10). It's a fairly neutral word, but also used in the context of pedophilia exactly because of its neutrality. ロリコン: (From "Lolita complex") A common word that refers to a male person who likes small girls. Basically it's a derogatory word, but it's not a harsh discriminatory term, either. I have a few friends ...


2

To my knowledge, どうしよう is mostly compatible with 怎么办 when it means "what should I do?" (often in self-talk). When the Chinese expression tells "what do you do?", it will be どうする? or どうしますか?


2

食欲がわく literally means "appetite springs up (in one's mind/heart)" → "have a good appetite", "feel hungry" or "feel like eating". The わく here is like "spring up", close to 生じる or 出る. わく in the phrase 食欲がわく should be 湧く (rather than 沸く, "to boil") in Kanji, but it's usually written in Hiragana. A few examples of this わく(湧く) from プログレッシブ和英中辞典: わく【湧く】 Ⅱ〔...


1

I found this: https://eow.alc.co.jp/search?q=%E9%A3%9F%E6%AC%B2%E3%81%8C%E3%82%8F%E3%81%8F Which says it means to work up one's appetite And I found this: https://eow.alc.co.jp/search?q=%E9%A3%9F%E6%AC%B2%E3%81%8C%E3%82%8F%E3%81%8F For what the Kanji might be: 湧{わ}く Does "I can't work up an appetite" make sense in the context of your game?


1

ので has similar meaning to から in that they can both mean "because, given that..." のだ, or のです are versions of んだ/んです that are more often used in writing and they don't really mean "because", they just imply the speaker or writer is explaining or emphasizing things. It's quite hard to explain, you can read up on it here: https://jlptsensei.com/learn-japanese-...


1

This 本番 means "most important phase". ラナ is saying, other phases of IT社長 are less important than the phase of dating with actress.


1

Shodo (書道, calligraphy) defines how those glyphs can be broken. At least "beautiful" broken glyphs has some rules, so when correctly written "行書" and "草書" are always readable. Broken glyphs out of such rules aren't guaranteed to be understood. This would be common for all Kanji-based cultures I suppose.


1

Probably you are checking the patent of 多重巻きパイプ用Cuめっきステンレス鋼板およびその製造方法 by 日新製鋼. I do not understand the whole detail of the patent for sure, but 融着{ゆうちゃく} should be related to 「セルフブレージング」: "self-brazing" since the background:「背景」of the patent says 『多重巻きパイプは、Cuめっきを施した鋼帯を造管用ロールで巻き回してパイプ形状に造管し、還元性ガス雰囲気中でCuの融点以上に加熱することによってCuめっき層同士を融着するセルフブレージング(以下、ブレージング)...


1

だす with a native verb in the i-form (連用形) means to start doing something. 働【はたら】き出【だ】す = start working. 言【い】い出【だ】す = start talking I can see why 滑り出し could mean beginning (imagining myself at the top of a large waterslide) but I'm curious to know if there is any historical context behind this. It seems to me that すべりだす is just another construction ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible