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12

This is simply an English confusion. When you look up delivery: Delivery or a delivery is the bringing of letters, parcels, or other goods to someone's house or to another place where they want them. Synonyms: handing over, transfer, distribution, transmission The definition above corresponds to 配達. Meanwhile, A delivery of something is the goods that are ...


5

交差点 only refers to "a place where two or more roads meet". Pedestrian crossings are called 横断歩道. Many 交差点 have 横断歩道, but they are not synonymous. 交差点 safely encompasses small ones, but I think Google Image Search mainly shows larger ones with 横断歩道 for two reasons: Simply, small 交差点 are are rarely discussed in the news or in politics. 交差点 does tend ...


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She's saying, "the situation is quite dire". 事 here refers to the situation at hand. And thus she says お願い. In other words, "Please donate some of your blood."


3

It helps to understand that this に in 妨害に[入る]{はいる} is に (Ⅲ)動作・作用の結果、状態や目的などを表す。 ... ㋗《下に移動を表す動詞を伴い、動詞連用形や動作性名詞に付いて》移動の目的を表す。 「映画を見に行く」 「家まで忘れ物を取りに帰る」 「町に買い物に出る」 (source: 明鏡国語辞典) In other words it indicates the purpose of a movement verb like [入る]{はいる}, 行く, 帰る, etc. So 妨害に[入る]{はいる} means to enter/step in/approach in order to interfere/get in the way. A few ...


3

Derivation あんまり is the emphatic version of あまり. あまり is a noun derived from verb 余【あま】る, "to be more than, to be extra". Usage In terms of usage, あまり is indeed generally used with negative verb forms -- however, the noun itself has no negative meaning. Consider the English word "much", of vaguely similar meaning. On its own, it has no ...


3

A pedestrian crossing or crosswalk (American) is a point where two lines intersect: a road and a designated area people can cross safely, sometimes invisible but can be physically marked. A crossing, junction or intersection (American) is also a point where two lines intersect, a road and another road. And when I look on google images for 交差点 I mostly see ...


3

Yes you can use シーン and 場面 interchangeably. Note that シーン in Japanese never refers to a geographical location; "return to the scene of the crime" is 犯行の現場に戻る, for example.


2

Your understanding is correct. The full sentence would be something like: 彼女はのそのそと緩慢な動きで大きなベッドの、ベッドに向って左側に寄って仰向けに寝た。 where ベッドに向かって is like an afterthought you'd put inside parentheses. The writer specified it because "the left side of the bed" changes depending on whether you're looking at the bed or laying on it.


2

When you say AとBは互角だ, A and B are treated equally. AとBは互角だ and BとAは互角だ are semantically the same sentence. In addition, 互角 is used only in the context of competition; the speaker is always interested in which is the stronger/superior one. On the other hand, AはBに匹敵する means A is comparable or competitive with B. The focus of this sentence is on A, and B's ...


2

たこと is nonsensical. It is not a word that I know of. (タコとエビ makes sense but consists of three words. Just a facetious aside) 叫んでいたことを知っていたよ -> 叫んでたことを知ってたよ Please see Just like "ら抜き" is there also "い抜き" such as "見ている" --> (い抜く) --> "見てる"? ておく → とく in other contexts; similar 2-kana to 1-kana shortcuts?


1

So what does 〜に入る mean here? 〜に入る here is just a modification for 妨害, so it is basically equivalent to 妨害してくる. Or how should I understand it generally You can think of X に入る as "come and do X" or "start to do X". Here are examples that I came up with: 仲裁に入る 成層圏に入る


1

いまいった in the above sentence can be analyzed at least in two ways. The first is much more probable than the second in any context. いま (now) + いった (have said) meaning, as I have said いま (now) + いった (have passed away) Considering the context and a very particular adjective of すじのいい (natural bent), it will be safe for me to determine on the first analysis. ...


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