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38

Is there an etymological connection between 輪{リン} as in 車輪{しゃりん} and "ring" in English? Or is this a false cognate? There are a few things we have to look at to answer this. Derivation of different Japanese readings As we can see in the Jisho.org entry, rin is an on'yomi for the kanji 輪. On'yomi are the "sound readings", the literal meaning of the ...


12

A recent guideline from 文化庁 clearly says this distinction is not important in most cases. See page 53 of this PDF (常用漢字表の字体・字形に関する指針(報告)(案)) (2016): As for 木, you can also use はね (). Some recent elementary school teachers are extremely strict on this kind of thing, which has caused much controversy. Outside school, very few adults care about this. If ...


8

Statistically speaking, the answer is definitely kanji, because the vast majority of Japanese nouns (including place names) are written in kanji. For example, on signboards, Tokyo is 東京 (kanji), Ginza is 銀座 (kanji), subway is 地下鉄 (kanji). However, there are over 1000 common kanji each with more than one reading, while there are only 40-some hiragana/katakana....


7

The road signs in most places in Japan have been standardised, such that any directional signs will typically have both Japanese (typically kanji with kana where appropriate) and English for place names. Most other signs will either have just a symbol or include a small amount of Japanese (e.g. 止まれ), possibly with English as well. As for shop signs, they ...


6

This is a typical matter of locality-related differences. The form on the top is accepted in Japan, as well as Taiwan, Hong Kong, Korea; it's the traditional one from the Kangxi Dictionary: The form below is the variant accepted as normative in Mainland China. As for "whether both forms are acceptable in handwriting," yes, they are and no, they are not, ...


5

Eirikr's answer has pretty conclusively demonstrated that "ring" meaning "round object" is unrelated, but I can't help but point out that there's a second meaning as well in English, namely "ring" as in the sound of a bell. Intriguingly, in Japanese the common tō-on on'yomi of the kanji for bell 鈴{リン} is also rin, and this character's reconstructed Old ...


5

That is 「榊{さかき}」. I shall let Wiki explain its meaning and religious use. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleyera_japonica


4

TL;DR Both Kanji are expected to be written with different stroke order because there is no "厂" in the Kanji 戚. This answer is based only on my own experience. All Kanji similar to 戈 have the vertical stroke as the first stroke and after that the horizontal one. For example, 戚 成 歳 蔵 城 減 感 to name a few. On the other hand, all Kanji similar to 厂 have the ...


4

I believe the first one is (furigana added): 読【よ】み込【こ】みバーグラフ. 数秒【すうびょう】... The second is harder for me to read. Here's my guess: サターンの マルコン みたいな x x x x The サターンのマルコン makes sense given the image. See also Google. That last word is a smudge. It appears to end in シー, possibly ミー. The first two kana are ... ??? Any more context you ...


3

The first one: https://tangorin.com/words?search=%E5%A3%BD The second one: https://tangorin.com/words?search=%E7%A6%8F


2

Yes, the kanji are 使用 The middle character is the 長音記号{ちょうおんきごう} sound extending mark「ー」and the word is シール (seal, as in stamp or sticker). Note that the bottom stroke of the シ angles up not down.


2

北 is the cardinal direction "north". 北部 is a combination of 北(north) and 部(part), and refers to the northern region/section/area of a landmass.


2

The linked post from ConMan in the comments (Do we really need to remember the kunyomi and onyomi reading of each kanji?) goes most of the way to answering your questions. But, to directly answer them: When do you use these readings? -- when the specific piece of vocabulary that is being used demands it. That is to say, you can't know for sure unless you ...


1

I think how to read your given name is up to you. So, mixing on'-yomi and kun'yomi in your name are possible. Both 虎{とら}威{い} and 虎{こ}威{たけ} should work. Probably giving boy's name as 虎{とら}威{い} will be popular since Rugby World Cup in Japan has been very popular for couple of months this year. For your surname「呉」, I think it is also up to you though, ...


1

I would preface an attempt to answer this question by firmly establishing the original meaning of「輪」. Ring is not actually a good translation of the character in Chinese (which has other words for ring); the two most common translations for「輪」in Chinese are: Wheel Cycle (or the related revolve) Notice the「車」(chariot) semantic in「輪」:「輪」originally referred ...


1

Please, take a look at this related discussion in reddit, in particular to the following passage: [...] As for the pronunciations of 描くI believe they are fairly interchangeable, but えがく is used more for artistic sketching or 'picturing' and かく for drawing diagrams.


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