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11

This is one of characteristics of 明朝体, the stylized emphases at the start and end of a brush stroke. In calligraphy, you are instructed to sink down your brush firmly at the beginning of every stroke. Then you will see more or less a 45-degree northwest-ward sesami-shaped blot there in each handwritten stroke, which is the ultimate origin of it. However, if ...


5

Generally it is not possible to predict whether 町 is read as まち or ちょう. 大手町 at the center of Tokyo is read as おおてまち while there is [大手町]{おおてちょう} in Kishiwada city of Osaka (source). As mentioned in the link, ちょう is more common in Western Japan whereas まち is dominant in Eastern Japan.


5

I feel like this question is lacking a super detailed answer, so I'm going to give an excruciatingly detailed breakdown of various kanji thresholds. 1500ish: This is probably the range of kanji that the average person remembers how to actually handwrite directly from memory. 2135: This is the number of jouyou kanji. These are the kanji that are required to ...


4

As a matter of fact, there is a food called 梅漬. The difference between 梅干 and 梅漬 is that 梅干 is made by drying the plums in the sun and then pickling them in salt, while 梅漬 is made without any drying in the sun.


3

As Eddie Kal has mentioned in the comments, you might want to take a look at on'yomi and kun'yomi. However, for this case in particular, はる meaning spring is always written as 春. 陽 is a nanori when pronounced はる, meaning it is usually only pronounced that way when used in names. It is typically pronounced ひ (kun'yomi) or ヨウ(on'yomi). The kanji is used in ...


2

There is no rule regarding how to combine jinmeiyō/jōyō kanji to create a name. So technically and legally speaking, 蓮藤香 and 廉藤香 are valid names, simply because they consist only of jinmeiyō/jōyō kanji. I'm sure a local office will not refuse this name. However, of course that does not mean every kanji combination is natural. (Vrleio is a legally valid ...


1

In general, もん is highly colloquial, and should be avoided in formal writings. もん may be fine in casual personal blogs, but it's out of the question in news articles, Wikipedia articles and such. Even in casual writing, もん sounds a bit rough, and many people choose to use 人 instead. However, this ~もん勝ち ("the one who does ~ is the winner") is an ...


1

BCCWJ returns: 45 examples for 者勝ち vs 17 examples for both もの勝ち and もん勝ち. For writing, 者勝ち seems more common as suggested by the corpus, but it could be only that we type that way (e.g. when I type 早い者勝ち below, it is suggested by the input method as I typed はやい). Since もん is an easier-to-pronounce version of 者, it does not exactly make sense to compare them ...


1

If you're talking about why kanjis are in the language, this is the history of Japan with China, you might want to read some literature about the subject. If you're asking about the utility of using kanji, there is a couple. It's separating words and grammar in a broad sense (because words don't consist exclusively of kanjis). Also, the same word can have ...


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