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5

This is a very interesting question. There are certain "classes" of words where I don't think native speakers would have this problem at all. I doubt anyone would read 父 as just 「と」, or 大 as just 「お」, unless it was being used cleverly in a number. However, I think when using okurigana for verbs one is more likely to be confused/unsure. Sometimes ...


4

Looks like 数 (かず), meaning number.


4

As you mention, there is no rule which predicts kanji readings with 100% accuracy. But there are some general guidelines which people follow. This rule of thumb is something like: Kanji compounds (two or more kanji together without kana between them) often use ON-YOMI. For example, 学校, 大学, 日本, etc. Words which have a single kanji combined with kana often ...


4

It's the word 魔女 with a simplified version of 魔 which uses マ to represent the phonetics of it. You can read more about this kind of thing on the Wikipedia article about ryakuji.


3

伍 is an alternative Japanese numeral that is used in formal documents. This documents can include legal documents. When they are used in legal documents, these set of numerals can prevent contracts, checks, and other documents from being changed or manipulated after printing. For example, the standard kanji for 1, 2, and 3 can be incremented up by the ...


3

I believe its a formal kanji used in legal documents. Also I read that its a jinmeiyō kanji, a kanji used for names. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jinmeiy%C5%8D_kanji The author probably chose to write more formal and older kanji because the story is set in the Taisho Period. Thats just my guess.


2

Well, it sort of works, depending how you interpret "works". The ENAMDICT database contains many rare names (and over 100 ways of writing the name あいみ in kanji — but not 鴉靉魅). The database does contain entries あいか 【鴉嘩】 そうあ 【蒼鴉】 えいこ 【靉子】 as well as several names using 魅 for the (common) ending, such as あさみ 【亜佐魅】 as "female given name"...


2

I’m also very new to japanese but from what I gathered each Kanji has two different types of readings: KUN reading and ON reading; both of which have their own fair share of history and context behind them. what matters is that ON reading is most of the times used when the kanji comes together with another one and KUN reading is mostly used when it comes ...


2

I tried to look for the surrounding text, but all I got were Taiwanese/Chinese sources. In the end I managed to find out that the big white character (which is for the most part obstructed by the illustration) is「嘯」and it seems to exist in Japanese according to kanji.jitenon.jp and jisho.org. Both seem to agree that it means to roar. The bottom red text ...


1

This 謂わば literally means "if I say", but it is an idiom that means "so to speak". The sentence translates to "Between a joint and a joint, there is another joint, so to speak". This should be a reference to the weird modeling of the characters in FF7 on PS1. A human's joint (e.g. the elbow) is usually a thick part of the body, ...


1

Unlike 戻る (which is a plain-form imperative), 順番 by itself is not a direct command to make someone move. In this video, the teacher simply reminded the students that there was something called 順番 that they needed to respect. Semantically, this "順番!" is more like "Remember 順番!". Likewise, we don't say "順番!" in militaristic ...


1

The sentence in the title 順番、順番!on its own, Turn , turn!, except in an unusual context, such as a response in a classroom as to what this word is, etc, wouldn't likely be used, since it's a noun. For an imperative, a verb meaning to turn and with the word ending for the 'imperative tense' would be used.


1

To address the second question "How it will look like writen in 草書 ?", I found an article commenting on "Kanji that do not look like Kanji", where they show an image of the 草書 for 卍: Click here to read the full article in Japanese.


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