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19

They are both slightly different simplifications of the traditional Chinese character which is 變. 变 is the simplified Chinese and 変 the shinjitai, i.e. the Japanese simplification. Often the simplifications are the same, but it also often happens that traditional Chinese characters have slightly different simplifications in Chinese and Japanese, for ...


11

I wouldn't necessarily say 々 is used to avoid having to write the same kanji again, but rather to make it clear that the word is obtained by duplication of a character — moreover the reading should be doubled (with rendaku where applicable). For example, 日本国語大辞典 (via kotobank.jp) has のま【々】 (「々」が、かたかなの「ノ」と「マ」を組み合わせたように見えるところからの通称。「ノマ」とかたかなで表記する) ...


7

The kanji spellings are directly borrowed from China, so it's Chinese that call them so. Cucurbits are originally tropical plants, thus they were all imported to East Asia at some points of history. 西瓜 suggests that it came from Western Regions, and 南瓜 from Southeast Asia. As they are tropical plants, 北瓜 shouldn't exist logically, but according to a Chinese ...


6

Yes. For example, here are two places in Chiba: 酒々井 (しすい) 行々林 (おどろばやし) You could also make arguments for 神々廻 (ししば), too.


2

Firstly none of this is about grammar. I have edited the question tags. Now on to the main question. The choice between katakana, hiragana and kanji is only relevant in the written language. It is possible to write everything in hiragana or katakana, but it would make it rather difficult to read. For example, some books for young children are written ...


2

This is simply because 考え has many meanings and is translated into English in various ways. 考えを示す is not really a tricky idiom; it's a set phrase that means "to show one's 考え", where 考え can be an idea, a plan, a suggestion or an opinion depending on the context. In your example, 考え refers to his plan.


1

First of all, you'd most commonly read 昨日 as きのう (a special reading), though the reading さくじつ is used more formally. Secondly, you have to bear in mind that the reading of a character is determined by what surrounds it (i.e. the word it is being used in). You can't predictably tell which reading will be used in a given word if the kanji in that word have ...


1

The character is「嘘」. Assuming that you've identified the furigana correctly, I can't think of a word where「嘘」has a reading「に」. However, I also think that furigana are usually written on the right, not on the left as specified in the question. I guess this is a question of character decomposition: 「嘘{きょ・こ}」is made from Semantic「口」(mouth, referring to some ...


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