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4

かたじけない is an older word that roughly means "mentally indebting". Is 忝い(かたじけない) used in contemporary language? It is an i-adjective, but you can take it as a samural/ninja way to say "thank you" (= it indebts me). しのぶ seems to be a female name. かたじけない しのぶ!! Thank you, Shinobu!! In manga, normal punctuation is rarely used so that you have to pay ...


3

According to ふりがな文庫, the most frequent kun-reading is うち. うち is mentioned in this entry, but うら is not mentioned in this entry. However うち, うら and なか equally make sense in your sentence, and I don't think it possible to determine the reading in one way without furigana. They are fairly rare kun-readings, anyway. FWIW, I knew only the on-reading, り, as in 秘密裡....


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The official answer is: the 旧字体 kanji are those that were officially matched to the corresponding simplified forms. The official List of Jōyō Kanji by Japanese Agency for Cultural Affairs has them in parentheses after the main entries. The official List of Jinmeiyō Kanji by Japanese Ministry of Justice contains two kinds of 旧字体: in the list itself (these ...


2

いいですね is a conversational expression which can be used with the meaning "That sounds good!", "Good idea!", "Great!", etc. When used in this sense, I would think most people would write it with kana. (Often it would be strange to say よいですね instead.) On the other hand, writing 良いですね can also be read いいですね, but it feels like 良い is used with a more precise ...


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It's basically a stylized way of using kanji. It's fairly common in manga and songs to substitute the standard reading for something else in furigana. It's a way of adding extra meaning to the 'main' phrase in kanji. There is actually quite a bit of flexibility available to writers when using this particular artifice. You can play around with it and do ...


2

Here are a few key things to note about this. Strokes: Let's keep it simple and call them 'components' for now, in that they are a collection of identical strokes. The two components you asked about are visually identical and most dictionaries list them as having 3 strokes, not 2 (e.g. such as Weblio).I'm not familiar with the app you mentioned so I can't ...


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I think part of the confusion here is that radicals are not the same thing as components. This is compounded by the fact that many sources use the term "radical" incorrectly, including jisho.org, which refers to what it offers as a radical search, but what it does is actually more correctly a component search. component is a term for any common part of ...


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