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12

Unfortunately, there is no easy rule here, and the same is true for many other kanji. もつ tends to appear in the names of basic things that have been around for hundreds of years. ぶつ tends to appear in technical terms related to physics, chemistry, etc (物理学, 化合物, 薬物, 毒物, 物性). Anyway, the number of common words where 物 is read もつ is small, and it's possible ...


7

It seems they add furigana to kanji that are not taught in elementary school (小学校). 緒、吐、丈、違 are not taught in elementary school. (参考: 学年別漢字配当表) [笑]{わら}う is taught in 4年生, but the readings [笑]{え}む、[笑]{しょう}、[笑顔]{えがお} are taught in junior high school (中学校). (See pages 24 and 51 in 音訓の小・中・高等学校段階別割り振り表 平成29年3月)


6

In general, furigana rules tends to be determined on a per-magazine or per-bunko-label basis, and the theme of each title is not always relevant. Titles published in 少年向け ("for early-teens") labels/magazines, such as 週刊ジャンプ, have lots of furigana even though individual titles sometimes contain adult-oriented themes. Titles belonging to ヤング/青年向け (for high-...


3

There are many instances where this happens in Japanese. For whatever reason, sometimes the Kanji is not used with a word. Here's a few examples: ありがとう (normal) 有り難う (kanji form) よろしくおねがいします (normal) 宜しくお願いします (kanji form) こんにちは (normal) 今日は (kanji form) Off the top of my head there are four reasons why this happens (possibly more). Kanji is ...


3

This is a common Chinese cultural symbol seen in Chinese-related residences. The Chinese-language expression「福到來」or「到福」means arrival「到」of fortune「福」, and when hung in a house, it represents the arrival of fortune at this house. 「到{とう}」is homophonous with「倒{とう}」(overturn, 転倒{てんとう}); the overturned/upside-down nature of the symbol is a pun on「到」.


2

The answer is a bit more complex than a simple yes or no. The reality is that meaning can change with the reading, it stay the same even though reading changes, or one reading can have multiple meanings based on context. Case 1: Meaning changes with reading Please note that this is not an exhaustive list, neither should it be treated as such. 行{い}く -- ...


2

Your core question seems to be this: Is it the case that there are no words in Japanese that bear both a 唐宋音 reading and either a 呉音 or 漢音 reading? If not, what are some examples? Looking just at the four terms listed above as 唐宋音【とうそうおん】, we can find that two of these have the listed 唐宋音【とうそうおん】 readings with one meaning, and a 呉音【ごおん】 or 漢音【かんおん】 ...


1

I think they would say ゼロ件, れい is used more for other meanings for instance if you reading a math book with many problems the sample problem with the solution will be called as Mondai Rei. x+1=0 => x=-1. (Mondai = problem, rei = 0)


1

I think the reading is generally ゼロ件. I found an interesting article about the difference between ゼロ and れい. https://chigai-allguide.com/zero%EF%BC%88%E3%82%BC%E3%83%AD%EF%BC%89%E3%81%A8%E9%9B%B6%EF%BC%88%E3%82%8C%E3%81%84%EF%BC%89/


1

The other answers were really great and taught me a lot. But in the context of names, I just found out that the Ministry of Justice specifically differentiations between 道 using one or the other of「⻌・⻍」/[one dot・two dots]. This means it's possible regular people specifically care about their name having one dot or having two dots (especially if "Some people ...


1

㐂 U+3402 is indeed a non-standard form of 喜 U+559C and is graphically made of 七 U+4E03 three times.


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