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10

The name of this NPC is ひもりめ in hiragana (Himorime in romaji). ひ is the most common kun-reading of 火. もり corresponds to 防, but this is a nonstandard kun-reading even native Japanese speakers do not know. もり is usually regarded as a kun-reading of 守, which is a kanji with similar meaning ("watcher/keeper/protector"). め is one of the uncommon kun-...


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You don't need kanji to speak Japanese, but I would suggest that not learning kanji would make learning the vocabulary harder. You don't strictly need to know kanji to write understandable Japanese. However, if you do write entirely in kana it will make your writing incredibly difficult for other people to read. 50,000 is a big exaggeration. The standard ...


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Not many scripts/alphabets have two "cases" like the Latin script does. The Latin (English, German, French, ...), Cyrillic (Russian, Ukrainian, ...), Greek and Armenian scripts have cases (Indo-European languages), but most other scripts are unicase. Quora - What are the languages that have both capital letters and lowercase letters? Other than ...


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株 originally referred to tree stumps, from which new stems sprouted. It then came to mean a unit of plants (consisting of several stems made up of one or more individuals). Such unit of plants can be multiplied by 株分け, where this unit is broken up and divided into smaller 株s which grow individually, and can then be divided again (see here). The procedure to ...


4

No, most Japanese kanji words have only one correct reading. For example, the correct reading of 電車 is always でんしゃ. Just because a character can be read in two ways does not mean a word using that character can be read in two ways. In partucular, many on-readings make sense only as part of longer compounds. However, some kanji words do have multiple possible ...


2

Afaik, we don't use spaces in any sentence, except at the beginning of a paragraph (However, this use is only seen in novels, textbooks, news articles, and newspapers). Instead, we use punctuation marks (句読点 | I know the English language has them too). I don't think 何時までですか would use 句読点, though. As for the comment of yours, it's very likely that such spaces ...


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Essentially answered in the comment, but hopefully the following clarifies your question. First of all, 常用漢字 is not about simplifying characters and almost never did, except 燈 → 灯. https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%B8%B8%E7%94%A8%E6%BC%A2%E5%AD%97#1981%E5%B9%B4%E3%81%AE%E5%88%B6%E5%AE%9A%E6%99%82%EF%BC%88%E5%BD%93%E7%94%A8%E6%BC%A2%E5%AD%97%E3%81%A8%E3%81%AE%...


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To me, it looks like a new compound coined by the author. It's not uncommon at all for a novelist to make up a new kanji word (see this for another example). It may be a rare term actually used somewhere in the past and known to experts. Still, an ordinary Japanese speaker don't know this word, and would not bother to look this up in a dictionary anyway. The ...


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The short answer is 'Yes'. But it's not as simple as that, obviously. Proficiency is a spectrum. And knowledge of kanji is integral for an all-round development of Japanese ability in other areas. It's a misnomer that you don't need kanji. The better your kanji knowledge is, the richer your vocabulary will be, the deeper your understanding of grammar will be,...


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See how many kanji and by the way as a additional information, how much vocabulary you need to learn for the different levels of the JLPT Test: JLPT Test, N1, 2000 Kanji, 10.000 vocabulary JLPT Test, N2, 1000 Kanji, 6.000 vocabulary JLPT Test, N3, 650 Kanji, 3.000 vocabulary JLPT Test, N4, 320 Kanji, 1.500 vocabulary JLPT Test, N5, 120 Kanji, 800 ...


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If you only want to speak Japanese, writing will be less important. I think that you will eventually reach a ceiling on how well you can speak it, though-- to reach a reasonably natural degree of speaking ability eventually you'll have to interact with written material which assumes you can read at least some kanji. If you want to write Japanese then kanji ...


1

I'll attempt to answer the question, but your confusion over the meaning is due to a general misconception you seem to have about how Kanji work. You may have noticed that 償 has a Kun and an On reading, whereas 賠 only has an On reading. 償 can be part of a word, for example 償還【しょうかん】 where you would use the On reading. It can also be used by itself as the ...


1

る is the 終止形 ending of the verb. So as you comment, V + っちゃ + V + けど would be the general pattern. 忙しいっちゃ忙しい (in the post) = I got things to do, but not ultra-busy. クラシックを聞くっちゃ聞く = I listen to classical music, but not a huge fan. そいつを知ってるっちゃ知ってる = I know that guy, but not very well. For the meaning, I think you already get it right.


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訪ねるも、訪問するも。意味に違いはありません。 「訪問」は同じ意味の漢字を二つ重ねた漢語です。「訪ねる」は、古来の日本語(和語、大和言葉)です。 「訪問」は漢語なので、「訪ねる」より改まった(堅苦しい)言い方になります。 There is no difference in meaning. The word "訪問" is a Chinese word made up of two Chinese characters with the same meaning. The word "訪ねる" is an ancient Japanese word (Japanese, Yamato language). Since "訪問" is a Chinese ...


1

As you quoted already チ is the sign of Go-on (呉音). Except 罰 is 慣用音 (which means the conventional pronunciation) Many websites suggest チ came from Go-on while ツ came from Kan-on (漢音). (see https://www.goodcross.com/words/19848-2019 for example) Basically Go-on is older than Kan-on, which might explain why many numerals are Go-on. I am not sure of what your 1)...


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