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9

てしまう can has the meaning of something bad, happened, unintentionally, in this case, dying is a bad thing. And the writer/speaker will use しまう to express his/her feeling towards what ever happened. 彼が死んだ, 彼が死んでしまった。Both means the same He's dead, but the latter has the meaning of the speaker feels bad about it.


5

As a general rule, it is pronounced じ after an on’yomi word and とき after a kun’yomi word. However, there are exceptions, and [食事時]{しょくじどき} is one of them. Curiously, 食事, despite being an on’yomi word, also exceptionally tends to take the politeness prefix お, rather than ご. I cannot explain why. I guess you should memorize each exception.


5

Perhaps even without those options, many native speakers can instantly give 人懐っこい or 人見知り(を)しない as the most natural expression which fits in that blank. 人懐っこい is such a common adjective to describe a friendly baby who smiles instead of crying when held by a stranger. 人懐っこい is also commonly used to describe a friendly animal. This is a rather simple ...


3

朝七時に起きられずに会社に遅れました sounds a bit awkward to me, but it still seems acceptable. 朝七時に起きられないで会社に遅れました sounds very weird.


3

どころではない is used when you have some other thing to worry about and cannot focus your attention to what you want to or are supposed to be doing. Of the three options, only (A) involves such an external distraction, namely a guest. Small letters and missing glasses in (B) and (C), on the other hand, are very much part of the reading itself. Having said that, ...


2

They are mostly interchangeable. 想像に任せる and 想像に任す mean the same thing. 任せた and 任した are the same, too. The godan version, 任す, sounds slightly more literary and uncommon to me. In particular, 任す almost never takes the imperative form (任せ!). There are similar verb pairs, including: 済ませる / 済ます 巡らせる / 巡らす 驚かせる / 驚かす 寝かせる / 寝かす See also: Could not understand why ...


2

I think しか is complicating the situation. 本格化するまで使える sounds natural but 本格化するまでしか使えない is a bit awkward. In the former, 本格化する unambiguously marks the end of the period during which the vaccination site can be used. The latter also expects the part before まで to mark the end of the same period but, for some reason, the verb 本格化する doesn’t seem to meet this ...


2

It seems to me that the phrase 前までしか in this sentence is practically equivalent to 前しか or までしか. So this phrase sounds a little awkward to me. It will be safe to say that 前 is used to emphasize まで, or, in other words, to avoid the misunderstanding of the context because almost all the Japanese do not know the exact schedule of 大会の準備が本格化する.


2

All these can be differentiated by having deeper understanding of Kanji. But to simplify it: 監督 - Movie directors (映画監督) comes in mind in most of the time, usually means a single person that is assigned a task to control. Or 監督する to take control, usually in an environment/situation. 管理 - Has a very wide meaning of to control/management. Example 監督 is ...


1

From what I can see, I don't think this is a pun. To begin with, the character's name is not まれ but のぞみ. 希 is rarely read as まれ in modern standard Japanese. Still, 稀 is a relatively bookish word, and ordinary speakers wouldn't say "って稀!" to mean something like "That's rare!" in speech. With more context, I may be able to say something ...


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