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21

やっぱり is a colloquial/casual version of やはり. やっぱり/やはり has several meanings/usages. For example... "as expected; as (one) would expect" やはりそれは本当だった。It was true, just as I thought/expected/imagined. 「犯人は彼だった。」「やっぱりね。」"He was the criminal." "Just as I thought/suspected. ⇒ That's what I thought. / I knew it." やっぱり言ったとおりだろう。That's exactly what I ...


17

普段 means "usually" in a daily life context. 通常 means "normal", as in the absence of a non-normal situation, especially in a formal context. They can roughly mean the same thing, e.g. if you say 普段はこの道を通ります or 通常はこの道を通ります, it both means you usually/normally take this route. However, for example you can say 大統領のパレードは通常この道を通ります but not 大統領のパレードは普段この道を通ります ...


15

Terminology First of all some remarks on the terminology used. Adverb (副詞) is the usual definition as it can be found in dictionaries. The other two words require some more thought. It seems 時相名詞 is a technical term used by jumandic, a dictionary for morphological parsers. Here's the only insight I could find: EDRは時詞という名前で、JUMANは時相名詞という名前で、...


14

的 makes 世界 into a 形容動詞 ("na-adjective"), which, when functioning as adverb, turns into ~的に. ~的では is simply ungrammatical.


14

This is either a typo or a "reado". Trying to reconstruct the original sentence from your rōmaji version, I'm guessing it is 茂作の顔に息をフーッと吹きかけた フーッと is listed in some dictionaries (e.g. WWWJDIC) ふーっと フーッと (adv,on-mim) with a whiff; with a puff The ッ is small (compare ッ with ツ) and is geminating the following "t" sound. The romanization ...


12

Here 大変 is used as a na-adjective. It's definition #3 in 研究社新和英中辞典: たいへん = "〈労力を要すること〉 a hard task; a difficult job." 仕事は大変だけど元気だよー She's saying her job is hard/tough and/or busy, but she's fine/healthy.


12

It's 結果構文 (Resultative Construction). The continuative form of an adjective (甘く here) represents the resultant state caused by the action (煮る). So 甘く煮る means "to boil/cook/stew and make sweet" (≂ 煮て甘くする), or "to boil/cook/stew in such a way that it will become sweet, by adding sugar" (≂ (砂糖で)甘くなるように煮る), i.e. "boil with sugar". Like in this phrase, I think ...


11

The most prevalent meaning of this word today that you should learn is "...at all?" to emphasize the depth of doubt in question, although it's quite distant from its etymology. はたし‐て【果(た)して】 3 (下に疑問を表す語を伴って)いったい。「果たして誰が栄冠を手にするか」 果たして……兄さんがやってのけるのか Does my brother dare to do such ... at all? Could my brother really dare to do such ... ?


11

No, you cannot attach です to an adverb. But 初めて is both an adverb and no-adjective. (A no-adjective is a special type of noun that is semantically similar to an English adjective. See this question.) You can confirm this fact in jisho.org's entry. For example, you can say 初めてのアメリカ, which means "(my) first (trip to) America". (Similar things happen all the ...


10

[大]{だい}[好]{す}き and [大]{だい}[嫌]{きら}い are somewhat special in that sense. Both 大{だい} and 大{おお} can be used with other words, but usually 大{おお} goes with 訓{くん}読{よ}み words and 大{だい} with 音{おん}読{よ}み words: [大]{だい}[問]{もん}[題]{だい} serious problem 大{おお}急{いそ}ぎ pressing, urgent One exception would be 大{おお}掃{そう}除{じ}. Prefixing おお or だい, however, only works for specific ...


10

「たぶん」は、英語の maybe よりずっと可能性が高いと思います。「たぶん」は probably に近いと思います。70~80%くらいの確率(あるいは90%?)かな?と思います。 明鏡国語辞典によると・・・ たぶん【多分】 二 〘副詞〙 《多く下に推量を表す語を伴って》断定はできないが、そうである可能性が高いという話‌​し手の気持ちを表す。おそらく。おおかた。たいてい。 "Will you marry me?" に "Maybe." と返事されたら普通はがっかりしますけど、「結婚してくれる?」に「たぶん。」と言われたらそんなにがっかりしない(どちらかというと嬉しい)と思います。 「たぶん治ります。」と言われた病気が、実は治る可能性は50%だった…とかだったら、きっと怒ってしまいます。...


10

わたしは今日、日本にかえります。 This is actually the most natural (or perhaps I should say neutral) word order and topic marking here. It’s common in speech to place a slight pause after 今日 (represented by a comma here). The reason for this is because it’s most natural for the subject of the predicate to become the sentence topic in Japanese. This is what happens by ...


9

Since no-one else has tried to answer, I'll write up a few thoughts in the hope of attracting a more knowledgeable person, Somebody Is Wrong On The Internet style. I do not think there is any single, universally accepted name for this form. Sometimes you see the term "ri adverb" (in Japanese, "り副詞"), but this often encompasses 3-mora adverbs too (yahari as ...


9

That なにも is a Guiding Adverb that leads partial negation. It means nothing by itself but functions as a sign that tells that partial negation is following. It's different from normal なに+も ((not) anything) in the point of pitch accent. [なにも{HLL} vs なに{LH}+も{H}] e.g. 何も、急がなくてもいいじゃないか You don't need to hurry, do you? Other examples of Guiding Adverbs are もし(...


9

「頭{あたま}で覚{おぼ}えたことは、忘{わす}れやすく動{うご}きに時間{じかん}がかかるという特徴{とくちょう}があります。」 = 「頭で覚えたことは、忘れやすく、動きに時間がかかるという特徴があります。」 The basic structure of this sentence is: 頭で覚えたこと has two characteristics. #1 is 忘れやすい and #2, 動きに時間がかかる. Judging from your comments and final translation, you did not grasp this structure correctly. Next, 忘れやすく is an adverb that is from an ...


9

While "as expected" is surely one of the meanings of 「果{は}たして」, it would not work in this context vey well. That meaning works only in a clear and declarative statement describing the expected result of an event. The sentence in question, as its ending would indicate, talks about the speaker's uncertainty regarding the outcome of his brother's action. It ...


9

The children rotated/turned the bowl so that it looked pretty/nice to their mother, with the (hand) painted design/motif ([模様]{もよう}/[柄]{がら}) facing her (i.e. so that the front of the bowl faced her). 例えば、こんな感じで…


9

I don't know what ぞんぞん means. (I'm from Kansai, by the way.) (In the article you found, they say ぞんぞんする means ぞくぞくする in 土佐 dialect.) The correct answer is どんどん. どんどん can mean not only "rapidly" "steadily" but also "one after another" "do...more (and more)" "do...a lot" "keep on doing" "continuously" etc. どんどん食べてください。 "Eat a lot." "Eat more."


9

Can adverbs modify adjectives? Yes. That's part of what adverbs do. Consider: [と]{●}[て]{●}[も]{●}赤【あか】い車【くるま】 a very red car [ま]{●}[ぶ]{●}[し]{●}[く]{●}明【あか】るい青空【あおぞら】 a dazzlingly bright blue sky Is 大きく modifying 厳しい? No. At least, not directly. In your sample sentence, as you correctly parsed it, the 大【おお】きく is not being used as a direct modifier on ...


7

One usage of 「[大]{だい}」 that native speakers frequently use but Japanese-learners do not is in the form of 「[大]{だい}の」. It is treated like a compound word meaning "huge", "full-fledged", "very good", etc. 大の[宮崎]{みやざき}ファン = a huge (Hayao) Miyazaki fan 大のおとな = a full-fledged adult 大のなかよし = a very good friend 大のコーヒー[好]{ず}き = a real ...


7

"大声で" isn't an adverb, but rather a noun followed by the particle で, which indicates the means by which something is done. The difference is like the English "There was even a person who was singing in a loud voice while climbing the mountain" vs. "There was even a person who was singing loudly while climbing the mountain". "大声で" is better thought of as the ...


7

You have a choice; You can say it with or without 「は」. The more informal the speech, the more often the 「は」 is dropped. The only situation in which 「は」 is not optional and it must be used is when you talk about what someone ate/will eat this morning in comparison to what he ate/will eat on another day. That is always 「けさは」 as 「けさ」in those cases is an ...


7

The concatenation of て verb represents several actions which are done one after another. For example, 持って行く means "bring" followed by "go". No, this is not always true. Te-form can combine two verbs like the English conjunction "and", but it does not necessarily mean the two actions happen one after another. For example, te-form can denote a method. ...


7

I think that 必ずしも is like 必ず but just used for negative sentences. I am pretty sure that 必ずしも must be used with a negative verb, which inevitably makes it mean "not always". It is the fact that it is combined with "限らない" that makes it that way, and not by itself.


7

やっと is an interesting word. It has elements of both finally and just in its meaning. I think there is actually a better translation for it though. やっと according to jisho.org is translated as at last; at length. I like these translations better because it gives a sense that your task has taken a lot of time, or that it has taken a significant amount of ...


7

「とうとう」implies a continual process that led to the outcome, whereas 「結局」doesn't. For example, one can say 「結局力不足なのだ」but not「とうとう力不足なのだ」because 力不足 is not a state achieved via a continuous process. On the other hand, one can both say「とうとう力尽きた」and「結局力尽きた」which has roughly the same meaning, but the former draws a lot more attention to the continued struggle ...


7

There is no prescriptive rule that covers where to end the katakana section when you write mimetic words, interjections and slang words in katakana (because they are colloquialisms anyway), so we don't have the "right" answer. It mostly depends on personal interpretation: that whether you want katakana-ify the concept or the word when you do, and ...


6

You've gotten a few things confused here. Here, ふる is a verb meaning "to dump" (or "to reject"). I don't know that "trip up" is a meaning of ふる, though I could well be unaware of it. So, ~にふられる means "to be dumped by ~". The 恋人 is the 友達's 恋人, not the speaker's. 落ち込む should be seen as a single verb with its own meaning here, rather than as a compound of ...


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