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30

YOU and Mark have already mentioned that 全然 can be used with a small set of positive descriptions, and that this is usage is not considered correct (which might be true, but it's absurdly common, so that doesn't really matter). But my impression is that the positive version of 全然 is not really limited to a small set of words, but rather to particular ...


18

とっても is a spoken variant of とても, just like すんごい is a spoken variant of すごい and あんまり is a spoken variant of あまり. If you're writing a paper or speaking in a formal setting, it's better to use とても.


17

Like YOU mentioned, Zenzen being used with positive words is slang and not correct Japanese. That being said, Japanese people use it all the time, especially young people. Typically I hear 全然 with OK、大丈夫、平気, 楽しい、and きれい with others possibly I haven't heard. That is to say that the words that are used with 全然 in a positive sense are probably limited to just ...


16

やっぱり is a colloquial/casual version of やはり. やっぱり/やはり has several meanings/usages. For example... "as expected; as (one) would expect" やはりそれは本当だった。It was true, just as I thought/expected/imagined. 「犯人は彼だった。」「やっぱりね。」"He was the criminal." "Just as I thought/suspected. ⇒ That's what I thought. / I knew it." やっぱり言ったとおりだろう。That's exactly what I ...


14

Comparing ぜひ来てくださいね。 きっと来てくださいね。 ぜひ expresses a hope/wish, whereas きっと expresses an expectation. (必ず would express obligation.) A teacher telling his students "きっと来てくださいね" means more like "I am expecting everyone to come". Thus きっと feels stronger (it's an expectation, after all), but may just mean that whoever is inviting really wants you to come. ...


13

Note: This is not a direct answer to your request for further usage examples of the two terms in different verbs. I rather try to explain the nuance with the help of a diagram and a pair of contrasting examples for each of the verb you gave. As you state in the question, both すっかり and さっぱり is about the completeness of something. The difference is that they ...


12

I think what's really going on here can be traced back to the two different ways 形容動詞 (けいようどうし: adjectival nouns or "な-adjectives") were inflected. If we look under the 連用形 (れんようけい: the "adverbial inflection", for lack of a better term) column under the first table on this Wikibooks page detailing Classical Japanese inflection patterns, we find the following ...


12

I looked the at the use of 感じる a few months ago. I came to the following conclusions: The verb is usually transitive (他動詞) ; it takes を with a noun (including embedded noun phrases with の)but It can also be intransitive (自動詞): Space ALC list it as both and give the example ~が退屈に感じる (feel bored [uninspired]). It can also take と to mark a "...


12

Here 大変 is used as a na-adjective. It's definition #3 in 研究社新和英中辞典: たいへん = "〈労力を要すること〉 a hard task; a difficult job." 仕事は大変だけど元気だよー She's saying her job is hard/tough and/or busy, but she's fine/healthy.


11

Not only "too [big]" and "very [big]", but I have also very often heard "so [big]" added to the mix of confusion by semi-conversational Japanese (not sure it's related, but it sure sounds like it). A potential lead for an explanation might be in the nuance of 「〜すぎ」in Japanese: it is generally more neutral than "too ~" in English. In fact, it is often ...


11

I'm going to assume you mean 先 as in さっき. It's usually written in hiragana to avoid confusion. I think the first sentences are just fine. The × one sounds like spoken language and ○ one sounds more like written language. In the second × sentence, though, さっき would not work because it's used for things that happened "just now" and ten years ago is not "just ...


11

「たぶん」は、英語の maybe よりずっと可能性が高いと思います。「たぶん」は probably に近いと思います。70~80%くらいの確率(あるいは90%?)かな?と思います。 明鏡国語辞典によると・・・ たぶん【多分】 二 〘副詞〙 《多く下に推量を表す語を伴って》断定はできないが、そうである可能性が高いという話‌​し手の気持ちを表す。おそらく。おおかた。たいてい。 "Will you marry me?" に "Maybe." と返事されたら普通はがっかりしますけど、「結婚してくれる?」に「たぶん。」と言われたらそんなにがっかりしない(どちらかというと嬉しい)と思います。 「たぶん治ります。」と言われた病気が、実は治る可能性は50%だった…とかだったら、きっと怒ってしまいます。...


11

No, you cannot attach です to an adverb. But 初めて is both an adverb and no-adjective. (A no-adjective is a special type of noun that is semantically similar to an English adjective. See this question.) You can confirm this fact in jisho.org's entry. For example, you can say 初めてのアメリカ, which means "(my) first (trip to) America". (Similar things happen all the ...


10

とっても is just a strong form of とても according to 大辞泉, so both are correct. It has similar pronunciation (may be a bit different intonation) with 取っても, so may be it could confuse some. But usage of とっても can be found since 昭和30年(1955) (at least) from this song called 月がとっても青いから by 菅原 都々子 (すがわら つづこ) So, I believe you can use it most of the time but if the ...


10

とにかく is usually translated 'anyway', and just like 'anyway' in English, it's used to change the subject of the conversation. とりあえず has a more specific meaning. It's often translated as 'for the time being', which is quite an accurate (if cumbersome) translation, since it's used only in cases where you want to tell the listener that you want to leave the ...


10

There is no difference in utterances for both words, if you speak those alone. But if you add some words after that, you might need to use "本当に~" to get correct grammar.


10

The first two are used in contexts like: "do it properly." ちゃんと手を洗ってください きちんと部屋を掃除してください。 To me, it seems that きちんと implies more concentration/involvement. The result is cleaner, more polished. Thus, ちゃんとできた would be "I did it as required", while きちんとできた would be "Not only did I do it as required, but I also paid attention to every detail." The ...


10

[大]{だい}[好]{す}き and [大]{だい}[嫌]{きら}い are somewhat special in that sense. Both 大{だい} and 大{おお} can be used with other words, but usually 大{おお} goes with 訓{くん}読{よ}み words and 大{だい} with 音{おん}読{よ}み words: [大]{だい}[問]{もん}[題]{だい} serious problem 大{おお}急{いそ}ぎ pressing, urgent One exception would be 大{おお}掃{そう}除{じ}. Prefixing おお or だい, however, only ...


10

Since no-one else has tried to answer, I'll write up a few thoughts in the hope of attracting a more knowledgeable person, Somebody Is Wrong On The Internet style. I do not think there is any single, universally accepted name for this form. Sometimes you see the term "ri adverb" (in Japanese, "り副詞"), but this often encompasses 3-mora adverbs too (yahari as ...


10

Terminology First of all some remarks on the terminology used. Adverb (副詞) is the usual definition as it can be found in dictionaries. The other two words require some more thought. It seems 時相名詞 is a technical term used by jumandic, a dictionary for morphological parsers. Here's the only insight I could find: EDRは時詞という名前で、JUMANは時相名詞という名前で、...


9

can I use “Totemo totemo daisuki desu”? Whether you can use it or not depends on the context. I think that “totemo daisuki” is redundant and therefore it is better to use either “totemo suki” (without dai-) or “daisuki” (without totemo) when some formalness is required. However, in informal contexts, there is nothing wrong with using the redundant ...


9

これから is saying "after this", as in, after the activity or thing you are doing right then. If you're having a coffee with a friend, you're talking about what you'd do after coffee. いまから is saying "from now", as in, after this moment of time. If you just bumped into a friend on the street, you're talking about what you're going to do soon in terms of time, ...


9

『中上級を教える人のための日本語文法ハンドブック』 explains the expression 不運にも on p. 382 as a sentence adverb (文副詞). Some adjectives like 不運な, 幸運な, 意外な, 皮肉な, 勇敢な, 卑怯な, etc. can take も after their conjuntive form to add some evaluation, criticism, or commentary of speaker to the whole sentence. For example, the sentense 意外にも、彼は集会に現れた。 (Surprisingly, he showed up to the assembly....


9

「頭{あたま}で覚{おぼ}えたことは、忘{わす}れやすく動{うご}きに時間{じかん}がかかるという特徴{とくちょう}があります。」 = 「頭で覚えたことは、忘れやすく、動きに時間がかかるという特徴があります。」 The basic structure of this sentence is: 頭で覚えたこと has two characteristics. #1 is 忘れやすい and #2, 動きに時間がかかる. Judging from your comments and final translation, you did not grasp this structure correctly. Next, 忘れやすく is an adverb that is from an ...


9

普段 means "usually" in a daily life context. 通常 means "normal", as in the absence of a non-normal situation, especially in a formal context. They can roughly mean the same thing, e.g. if you say 普段はこの道を通ります or 通常はこの道を通ります, it both means you usually/normally take this route. However, for example you can say 大統領のパレードは通常この道を通ります but not 大統領のパレードは普段この道を通ります ...


9

The most prevalent meaning of this word today that you should learn is "...at all?" to emphasize the depth of doubt in question, although it's quite distant from its etymology. はたし‐て【果(た)して】 3 (下に疑問を表す語を伴って)いったい。「果たして誰が栄冠を手にするか」 果たして……兄さんがやってのけるのか Does my brother dare to do such ... at all? Could my brother really dare to do such ... ?


9

While "as expected" is surely one of the meanings of 「果{は}たして」, it would not work in this context vey well. That meaning works only in a clear and declarative statement describing the expected result of an event. The sentence in question, as its ending would indicate, talks about the speaker's uncertainty regarding the outcome of his brother's action. It ...


9

It's 結果構文 (Resultative Construction). The continuative form of an adjective (甘く here) represents the resultant state caused by the action (煮る). So 甘く煮る means "to boil/cook/stew and make sweet" (≂ 煮て甘くする), or "to boil/cook/stew in such a way that it will become sweet, by adding sugar" (≂ (砂糖で)甘くなるように煮る), i.e. "boil with sugar". Like in this phrase, I think ...


9

The children rotated/turned the bowl so that it looked pretty/nice to their mother, with the (hand) painted design/motif ([模様]{もよう}/[柄]{がら}) facing her (i.e. so that the front of the bowl faced her). 例えば、こんな感じで…


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