16

I think I can see how you are confused about these two words, but I feel like the confusion might have stemmed from the English Japanese dictionary definitions, or rather the confusing nature of the English word "surgery". I don't think the two Japanese words overlap as much as the related English concepts. "Surgery" is a medical ...


8

As in @deeeeekun's answer, 生き物 is more colloquial and it is used to describe living things with clear vital sign. Students taking care of rabbits or golden fish in an elementary school is [生き物係]{いきものがかり}. (いきものがかり is a popular music group in Japan for this 20 years.) The homophone word 活きもの is used to describe fresh fish (Probably alive, but necessary if it'...


8

They're synonyms, but 生き物 is more colloquial. You can still use it in formal situations, but it's not common to use 生物 in normal speech. It's not weird to refer to plants as 生き物, but I think animals would first come to mind.


7

Etymologically speaking, いろいろ is 'full of colors', and さまざま 'various in one's appearance or figure', but this does not give us a reasonable answer. Answers and comments about the difference between these confusing words, which are found on the Internet, assert that いろいろ puts more emphasis on the greater number of things, while それぞれ on the differences of ...


7

出て行く is a compound word whose command form (命令形) is idiomatically used to tell someone to get out or get lost. Why not "出ろ"? Well, in similar contexts 出ろ would mean "get out", "leave", or "exit" without the rudeness and/or anger associated with 出て行け For example, if I am having friends over for a house party and I all ...


5

Yes, it emphasizes「出る」.「出て行く」is a set phrase meaning "to go out and away." You can interpret it as the verb「出る」in the「Vていく」form. A verb in the「Vていく」form has many meanings. In this context, when「いく」is appended to any motion verb, it gives the nuance of moving away from a speaker's viewpoint. So,「すぐに出て行け」literally means "get out (go away from me)...


5

手を伸べる (or 手を差し伸べる) is a set phrase that means "to offer/extend a helping hand". I confirmed 47 out of the 50 examples of 伸べ in BCCWJ are used as part of this set phrase. Although dictionaries explain several other historical usages of 伸べる, you have almost no reason to use 伸べる outside this set phrase in modern standard Japanese. (Not to be confused ...


4

白い, 黒い, 赤い, 青い, 黄色い and 茶色い are the only Japanese i-adjectives for colors, as probably any textbook says. For those colors, you should be using those i-adjectives in more than 90% of the time. However, there are cases you can (or should) treat 白/黒/赤/青/黄色/茶色 as nouns (aka no-adjectives). The largest reason to say 青の instead of 青い is when you want to use it ...


4

外科 is more commonly used to refer to the field of surgery academically and professionally, and is a noun. 手術 is more used to refer to the act of surgery and can be a verb. In other words, if the former is thought of as "surgery," the second can be thought of as "operating" or "an operation."


4

見てできる is just "[you] see and then [you] can do" or "[you] can do [it] after/by seeing [it]", not "can see". If you know the basic function of the te-form, this should be straightforward. It never means 見られる/見える, and it has nothing to do with one's seeing ability. 見てできる modifies 臨床ケア as a relative clause, so the very literal ...


3

Going by your phonetic transcription: the vowel in "Tuh" actually doesn't exist in Japanese, so it'd be hard to mishear it as another word Japanese word, it'd just sound like a very American pronunciation of the Japanese "ta", so it shouldn't cause an issue. "Kay" (rhyming with "Hey") is actually fairly close to the ...


3

なんかこれ変。 The statement "今日は大学の講義で日本状の経営について学んだ。" just doesn't sound right to me and I'm a native. I can see what it wants to say, but it just isn't right. Is this on some sort of textbook? Where is this from? At least it certainly isn't something a Japanese person would write. You are right to suggest 式.  Alternatively, 流 (ryu) would work too. ...


3

Generally speaking, 震う is an old form of 震える with the same meaning. Such uses of 震う are found in the literature of Meiji Era as 身体のぶるぶると震う, おののき震うと同じ状なり, 袋を持った手がガチガチと震う, and 肩の震うばかり胸にこたえた, all of which sound old-fashioned to us. But it seems to me that there are some exceptional uses of 震う in Modern Japanese. For example, 震っている can be said to have derived ...


2

One sounds formal and it is kosher with most dictionaries, Utagau, while the latter, うたぐる, is more casual and actually two words put together in a slang-y way. I guess I could pull "Guesstimate" as an analogy - where Guess and Estimate are lumped together for a funny, casual effect. The same thing is going here. うたぐる is うたがう and かんぐる (go on a limb ...


2

They mean very similar things. However, they are not totally interchangeable. The other definitions in the link you gave shows how they can be different. なんとなく 特に目的や動機などはなく、それといった理由もなく。 言動などに、はっきりとした理由・目的がないさま。なんとはなしに。 なんだか 物事がはっきりしないさま。原因・理由などがよくわからないさま。 For なんとなく, there is no particular reason (or the reason is too petty to be considered). For なんだか, ...


2

Is 行く used to emphasize 出る ? I wouldn't say so. 出て行け is just a go-to phrase when you want to say "Leave!". Changing it to something like 出て(ください)sounds almost polite, and saving the emotion from original is 出ろ which is (Get out) would mean you want someone out, not away, just out, also sounds like start of a fight(表に出ろ) :) I think it's just one of ...


2

When you say AとBは互角だ, A and B are treated equally. AとBは互角だ and BとAは互角だ are semantically the same sentence. In addition, 互角 is used only in the context of competition; the speaker is always interested in which is the stronger/superior one. On the other hand, AはBに匹敵する means A is comparable or competitive with B. The focus of this sentence is on A, and B's ...


2

Frankly speaking I cannot clearly understand your point or problem, but I would like to try my best within my understanding. At first sight the two sentences in the first pair seemed to me almost equivalent. After some time of staring at these sentences, I have found a difference, as you have. 日本へ行くとき(に)、日本語を勉強しました (beforehand and simultaneously) 日本へ行くまえに、...


2

I'd use レイヤー. It's also what they use in Adobe's official Photoshop tutorials.


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