Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
20

I hate to sound realistic here, but the concept of the female ninja is basically all fictional to begin with. If I am not mistaken (which I do not think I am), there exists no record so far that proves the existence of a female ninja in real life that performed the same tasks as a male ninja such as surveillance and destruction. That being said, the word 「...


7

Although Sino-Japanese words (aka kango) are technically loanwords, they have been an integral part of the Japanese vocabulary for more than 1000 years. Practically speaking, it's almost impossible to avoid all of them. Some very common kango which have no easy wago equivalent include: 百, 千, 万, ... hundred, thousand, ten thousand... 学校 school 日本語 Japanese (...


3

数 refers to the number of individual objects/things. 量 refers to the overall bulk amount of something. Both can be measured. ○ バナナの数が300万本にまで増えた。 × バナナの量が300万本にまで増えた。 × バナナの数が300万トンにまで増えた。 ○ バナナの量が300万トンにまで増えた。 In terms of your specific question regarding types of fruit, if you really wanted to use either 「量」 or 「数」 to refer to the number of individual ...


3

This depends on the topic and the type of what you are writing, so it's impossible to generalize. An article about programming or Disney characters will naturally contain a lot of katakana words, whereas you probably want to intentionally avoid katakana words when you are writing a samurai novel. You can see a statistical analysis based on a newspaper corpus ...


3

In general, I feel you can safely say yes, especially if you already consider them to be part of your family. Compare 義理のきょうだい (sibling-in-law, i.e. the spouse of your siblings / the siblings of your spouse), which is not usually included in plain きょうだい. I don't think there is any language- or culture-specific occasions where you have to mention the step- ...


3

分かる refers to the transformation from わかっていない to わかっている. So, even if you say もう分かる, it's still not yet わかっている. It rather means the transformation from わかっていない to わかっている will already (succeed). As an example: 英語の基礎力はあるので、明日の新聞の内容はもう分かると思う 英語の基礎力はあるので、明日の新聞の内容はもう分かっていると思う The second sentence is strange because it implies you know the content of tomorrows' ...


2

くせに doesn't change the grammatical connection. It is nothing but a のに in the syntactic layer, but adds a sense of disapproval (What's the difference between にしては、 わりに and くせに?) in the pragmatic layer. In other words, the nuance くせに has doesn't go against any particular word in this sentence. If I had to merge it into an English sentence, I'd choose to ...


2

分 is used as "one tenth" in several context, e.g. in these meanings on jisho.org. So 十分 is ten tenths, or 100%, or enough. 十二分 is equivalent to twelve tenths, or 120%, or more than enough.


1

In your case, simple verbs like 語る and 話す should work because the poem is just a part of his story. Or you can avoid any verb corresponding to "tell" and say something like 彼の話は詩から始まりました. (詩で物語を始める is a little puzzling.) You may not need them, but verbs commonly used with verse/poetry include: 語る (this can refer to dramatic storytelling like that of a ...


1

I know children would rather write in hiragana but what about for adults? If 100% of your text consist of kana only without any kanji, that is 100% weird. Kanjis are used not only to help identify what meaning for for sound, but also kanjis work as visual dividers for text into small portions for better eye-brain parsing of text, because there is no spaces ...


1

To avoid step/in laws relation and blood relation confusion, Japanese language do have word as @Yosh mentioned. (ぎりーin laws/related by marriage) To reveal it or not and to whom you reveal it that is totally your choice. As this is not something related to language, it is your personal decision. Japanese people greatly respect each other's personal space. ...


1

To specifically answer one of your questions using your example: ...if you wanted to say that the number of something was increasing, (for example, the types of fruit in a supermarket) how could that be phrased? It could be phrased: スーパーにある果物の種類が増えている。 The types of fruits in a supermarket are increasing. As @sbkgs4686 says in their answer, you don't ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible