15

In this case, it would be read as [一日]{いち・にち} which just means "(one) day" as opposed to [一日]{≪ついたち≫} which means first of the month. My gut says that in this case 一日 is acting like "your day" in particular, trying to evoke your subjective answer of how it was in particular for you. If she had just asked you 「どんな[日]{ひ}でしたか?」, it would sound to me like a ...


10

反面 is literally "the other side (of a coin, etc)", so it's used to describe the two different sides of the same subject. 一方 is just like "on the other hand"; it is widely used to compare or contrast two different things which may or may not belong to the same subject. 彼は普段は優しい一方(で)、怒ると非常に怖い。: OK 彼は普段は優しい反面(で)、怒ると非常に怖い。: OK 東京は晴れている。その一方(で)、...


9

In scientific contexts where accuracy and precision are clearly distinguished, use: accurate = 正確(な); accuracy = 正確性/正確度 precise = 精密(な); precision = 精密性/精密度 精度 is also used to translate precision, but since it's defined inconsistently in some areas, I personally do not prefer this term when the distinction is important. Reference: 正確度と精度


7

What are natural ways to say "If I can help you with noun phrase‍"? If I understand English correctly, this phrase should mean "if there is a chance I am of help to you with...", but unfortunately, your Japanese sentences mean "if I have enough ability to help you with..." In other words, it presupposes somebody does need help, rather than may or may ...


7

This is the difference between what a word means according to a bilingual dictionary and what a word means within its native language. According to the 日本国語大辞典 その土地またはその学校などから世に出ること。また、それまで過ごした経歴{けいれき}。 So the word 出身 literally speaks of where a person has come "out of" or "from," it makes sense to use where instead of what because of this. Note also ...


6

"Safe" as an adjective is 安全だ, which is a na-adjective. "Is this safe to do?" is usually translated as "~しても大丈夫ですか?', "~しても安全ですか?" is less common. We rarely say 安全的, and 硬い as the meaning of a word "safe".


6

歩道 is a path made for walking. A sidewalk or foot path. 舗装 does not mean a path made for walking. It is the surface of a road. In the form 舗装する it can be a verb that means to pave a road. Perhaps the confusion is coming from the fact that 舗装 can be translated into English as "pavement," and in British English "pavement" can mean "a path made for walking." ...


6

This is not necessarily an easy question to answer because of the wide range of meanings 'plan' has in English, but I will try in any case! For me, 予定 is something that you (strongly) intend to do, and likely have made arrangements for too. Looking at the kanji might help here: 予 imparts the meaning of 'beforehand', and 定 imparts the meaning of 'determine' ...


5

Both conjugations are correct, and are interchangeable in casual to moderately-formal settings. In formal written Japanese, however, ~くありません/~くありませんでした is the better choice. ~くないです/~くなかったです may be seen as colloquial, informal or even a little childish, depending on the situation. In general, in highly stiff formal text, it's (still) safe to avoid i-...


5

I tend to remember N+にしては as "even though (it is) N", while I tend to remember N+の+わりに(は)as "considering N". Of course, both can be translated "for", but this distinction helps me a little. Clearly, both phrases express something unexpected. They are sometimes interchangeable, but にしては needs to point directly to the characteristic you are talking about, ...


5

大都市 is just a plain word "large city" that doesn't have a strict definition in Japanese. And the problem here is that 大 in 大都市 and 六大都市 are different in meaning. By saying N大[noun] with a number N, you mean "the N major [noun]s", where the 大 roughly means "important" in this formula. They are not necessarily "large" in measure or whatever. 世界三大料理 The ...


5

怪獣【かいじゅう】 is a common word that refers to (big) monsters. This was a popular genre in the Japanese film industry, and there is an Wikipedia article written in English. Character-wise, 怪 means "wicked; strange", and 獣 means "beast; monster". 海獣【かいじゅう】 is a rare biological term which refers to marine mammals such as seals, whales and manatees. The kanji 海 ...


5

役回り is not necessarily negative, but it's something passive. 明鏡国語辞典 defines 役回り as: やく‐まわり【役回り】 役の回りあわせ。割り当てられた役目。 (※回り合わせ = twist of fortune) That is, you don't actively take some 役回り, but you passively (or sometimes randomly) end up being assigned to some 役回り. No one wants to actively take a bad role, so it is true that 役回り tends to refer to ...


4

知り合い refers to people. It means "acquaintance" in the sense of "people who know each other". It's like "friends" but not so close as 友達. 付き合い refers to relationship. It means "acquaintance" in the sense of "the state of knowing each other". It's close to 交際. 彼女とは昔から付き合いがあります。 Literally, "With her, since a long time ago, there has been 付き合い." → I've had ...


3

All those sentences can be question ("Ready?") or predicative ("Ready."). 準備はいい (junbi wa ii) Q: lit. "(Are you) well-prepared?" ~ "Are you ready?" P: lit. "(I am) indeed well-prepared." This one is based on an idiom 準備がいい "well-prepared". If you use the exact phrase in question, it becomes almost equivalent to English "Are you ready?", or "Have you done ...


3

そっか is very casual, and it's clearly inappropriate in formal settings. On the other hand, なるほど is safe in business exchanges, but it can sound a little pompous. If a small kid said なるほど, it would sound funny. Both なるほど and そっか are used like "Aha, I (finally) got it!", but I feel そっか is mainly used when you have realized a bad thing, e.g., "Oooh, so I was ...


3

太陽を最後に我々は見たのはいつだ? First of all, this sentence is incorrect. の is a formal noun and 見た modifies の as a relative clause (this construction is also known as a cleft sentence). You basically cannot use は inside a relative clause. The correct sentence is: 太陽を最後に我々が見たのはいつだ? When did we see the sun last time? Does it mean that [wareware] is more ...


3

I think the translation, plainly and without any other context, is: このアカウントをフォローして、写真や動画をチェックしよう。 Let’s follow this account and (then) check the photos and videos. The volitional form used on its own has the meaning of “let’s”, and applies to the whole phrase. The earlier して is acting connectively. して mid-sentence cannot, to my knowledge, be used ...


3

It depends on what you actually do. 原発 (short for 原子力発電所) refers only to a nuclear power plant. If your specialty is to design or install a large machine to generate electricity, 原子力発電技術者 makes sense. 原子力 is nuclear power. If your job is related only to producing energy (power plant, atomic battery, etc), you can use 原子力技術者. If your specialty is more ...


3

Today, 大都市 typically refers to large cities with at least 1M population, but the criterion is subjective and relative. There is no strict definition defined by a concrete number. When the term 六大都市 was determined by the government in 1922, Nagoya and Yokohama had only 0.4M people. 札幌 had only 0.1M people in 1922 but has 1.9M now. I believe most people don't ...


3

When I first arrived in Japan in the summer of 1970, 山手線 was known simply as やまてせん - it (suddenly) came to be known as やまのてせん around a year later. Back then, I had never seen it referred to as 山ノ手線. Further, the area where we lived in Yokohama was also known as the Bluff, 山手, やまて, between the 石川町 and 山手 stations along the 根岸線.


2

To begin with, 都市 and 市 are different concepts, and they are usually not interchangeable. Please read this first: What is the difference between 市, 都市, 都会 and 市街 市の名前 is a perfectly valid and natural expression as long as you know you are actually referring to some 市. But when you don't know the name of a city, you may not know if its really a 市, either, so ...


2

くない is actually く+ない and ない is a plain negative form of ある of which a polite negative form is ありません, so this is how you arrive to/from くありません. In comparison it's more formal (and possibly stiff in a more casual setting) while くない(です) is more conversational


2

At least in Japanese, 掛軸(かけじく) is a type of 掛物(かけもの). 掛軸 only refers to hanging scrolls. Note the kanji 軸 ("axis/shaft"), which refers to scrolls in this context. 掛物 is much less common, but it is broadly used to refer to paintings and calligraphic works​ that are intended to be hung on a wall. The kanji 物 is just "thing(s)" or "one(s)". They include 掛軸, ...


1

The difference between ばかり and ところ is that ばかり means you just finished, can be 1 minute ago, 1 hour ago, 1 week, it really depends on what you are talking about. ところ means this moment exactly. for example: 彼は旅行から帰ったばかりでも、また旅行する。 (Even though he just came back from his trip, he is going on another trip.) 帰ったところ、電話が鳴った。(the moment I got home the telephone ...


1

The verb that corresponds to 背を is 見ろ. He rephrased 俺 with a more concrete and dramatic phrase, 世界のすべて城砦に抱く英雄たる男の背. Since this is not in a casual situation, I feel を is missing before 城砦, but it may be possible if this is recited in a verse-like way. So the "plain" version of this sentence is: 世界のすべてを城砦に抱く英雄たる男の背を見ろ! Behold the back of the man (=俺), ...


1

Did a quick concordance search on google and came up with ~420k hits for 原子力技術者 and ~25k for 原発技術者. The former also pulled up hits on job websites, so I'd go with that for your LinkedIn. You have a couple options for how to say where you work. You can say [Company]の原子力技術者, but I've also seen [occupation]@[Company] a lot of social media like Twitter.


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