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9

おじ is "uncle", but おじさん is not necessarily "(Mr.) uncle" any more. おじさん usually means "middle-aged guy", and you can refer to someone as おじさん even if he is not your uncle. You can even say 私はもうおじさんだ ("I am no longer young"), referring to yourself, and this さん has no honorific meaning. The same can be said for おばさん ("middle-aged lady"). This process is ...


6

It depends on the context. さくじつ and きのう both mean yesterday (and the same Kanji 昨日 is used for the words). A major difference in their usage is that さくじつ is almost always used in a formal context (written and spoken), while きのう is often used both in formal and informal contexts (written and spoken): Using さくじつ in a casual conversation seems weird. You can ...


6

「普通{ふつう}の人なら、あの​状況 {じょうきょう} ​ではまず間違{まちが}いなくパニックになるわ。」 「まず」, in this context, does not mean "first" as you stated. In Japanese, it is synonymous to 「おそらく」、「ほぼ」、「多分{たぶん}」. In English, it would be "for the most part", "likely", etc. Does まず denote a aspect of time, as in 'first (time)' in that situation? No, not in that context, as I briefly ...


6

As a Sino-Japanese compound, 正解 is more formal, and this is the word used in serious examinations and serious quiz shows. 当たり is more casual and colloquial, and it's mainly used for a riddle, a quick quiz, a "guess what" type question, or such. 当たり also refers to a completely random "win" or "hit" as in roulette or lootboxes. In this case, 当たり is not ...


6

So you are asking which of the following two parsing strategies is correct: ((暑いところでできる→)芋から作った→)食べ物 (暑いところでできる→)((芋から作った→)食べ物) And the correct answer is 1. 暑いところでできる is modifying 芋 as a relative clause, and this できる means "(for a plant) to grow". The whole phrase means "food which is made from tubers which grow in hot places". Why? Because 1 is simpler ...


6

I suppose the simple answer is that the grammar of the past is different. First of all, in Classical Japanese 臨む would be the 連体形 (basically dictionary form). Unlike in modern Japanese, the 連体形 doesn't have to be nominalized to be used with が. Secondly, the classical が worked a lot like the modern day の to attribute things. From 大辞林 (emphasis mine): ...


5

如し is an archaic Japanese adjective used like modern (の)ようだ. It takes a noun followed by either の or が. This is still used in some set phrases and archaistic sentences. 夢の如し。 = 夢のようだ。 = (It) is like a dream. 龍が如く戦へり。 = 龍のように戦った。 = (He) fought like a dragon. This が is not a subject marker. が was used for the possessive meaning just like modern の in archaic ...


4

verb + かどうか is a grammar pattern that roughly means either of: (forming an embedded question) "whether or not" What does this usage of 「かどうか」mean? VかV-negか vs. V | V-neg vs. Vかどうか (forming an no-adjective-like phrase) "may or may not", "problem of whether or not", "whether-A-or-B situation" Understanding ~かどうかだ In your example, かどうか is used in the ...


4

前の文の内容と違うことがある... 「~~と違う」 means "is different from ~~". The と in ~と違う indicates 「比較・類別の際に照合される相手」(明鏡国語辞典) or 「比較の基準」(#3 in デジタル大辞泉). It's used with a word that expresses difference, similarity, identity, or comparison, such as 同じ, 違う, 異なる, 似る, 比べる, etc. Eg: ~と同じ -- is same as~~ ~と異なる -- differs from~~ ~と似ている -- is similar to~~ ~と比べる -- compare ...


4

From my experience, サッカー is almost exclusively used to refer to the one you use your foot for most of the time, and アメフト for the handegg version. As some fun examples of usage, you might want to check NFL Japan's site or read some of Murata Yusuke's Eyeshield 21.


4

I would interpret it like this: 女性が生む子どもの数 The number of children that women give birth to. 女性一人が生む子どもの数 The number of children that one woman gives birth to. In other words, the number of children born per woman.


3

According to the patent : 警告{けいこく}表示{ひょうじ}機能付{きのうつき}数値制御装置{すうちせいぎょそうち} by DMG森精機{もりせいき}. The safety procedure : 注意書{ちゅういが}き, attached to the bottom left in the image, is a bit blurry though, it looks similar to the machine in the image you provided. So, I think the exprssion 「貼付{ちょうふ}」as the other answer provided, 「貼{は}られている」 basically fit with your question....


3

I know nothing about CNC or its 設定表, but I believe it is packed together. 添付【てんぷ】 always means "place it alongside", so you should find it separately. If it were built in or written in the machine's memory, I think they would use 内蔵 "store inside". As an aside, a considerable number of people confuse 添付 with 貼付 "stick on" (whose correct pronunciation is ...


3

The immediate question This に is the locative に indicating where something is happening. どこ​[に]{●}​立【た】ちますか。 Where [LOC] stand [question mark]. → Where [do you] stand? ここ​[に]{●}​立【た】ちます。 Here [LOC] stand. → [I] stand here. In your sample sentence, the に tells us where the action is taking place -- specifically, where その巨大【きょだい】な学園【...


3

So, the simple answer to your question is that 遅々として is a set phrase, and is used commonly enough with 進まない that the whole thing is in the dictionary as a set phrase. That said, it's also worth keeping in mind that not every instance of とする and として necessarily have to be mean as. とする has quite a few different usages, and it can also just come about ...


3

平穏な暮らしをしている限りはわからないわ。 You won't notice it (=the ability) as long as you are leading an uneventful life. This する is "to do". Although "to do an uneventful life" makes little sense in English, 平穏な暮らしをする makes perfect sense in Japanese. Basic "light verbs" like する, やる, かける, とる, ひく and so on have lots of unpredictable usages, and you have to remember which ...


3

Remember が is a subject marker. 2人の間に between the two (parents), 男の子が a boy (←SUBJECT!) できた。 came into existence / started to exist / formed. Hence "a boy was born". できる is an intransitive verb, whereas "to conceive" is transitive. When you say "to conceive a child", the child is an object, but that's not how the original Japanese ...


2

~者 is a generic suffix which means "person who does the job of". It's usually used when there isn't a common alternative. It's typically used for a profession and doesn't require membership of an organisation. The emphasis is on the skills that they perform, not where they perform them. 医者 doctor (medicine-person) 歯医者 dentist (dentistry-person) 翻訳者 ...


2

As you state in your question, し is used when there's multiple reasons for things. As you also point out: ... or is it kinda like や, where the other reasons might not be stated? it can be used to imply that there might be other reasons not stated besides the stated one. Therefore, し can be used even with one element: 私の仕事は給料も低いし。In my job, I have ...


2

えいがはなにをみましょうか implies an invitation. しましょう(か) means "Let's". It means (私達は)何の映画をみようか("What movie should we watch?" Or "Let's watch a movie. What is a good movie to watch?"), えいがはなにをみますか is a question. It is "What movies do you watch?" えいがはなにをみませんか is also a question. You are asking someone what movies he doesn't watch. However, it is rarely used and a bit ...


1

I will answer first your 2nd question, and after that I will address your 1st question. 2. Does the last sentence even make sense? No, the 3rd sentence does not make sense. Only the 1st and the 2nd sentences make sense: えいがはなにをみますか。Regarding movies, what will [you/we] watch? えいがはなにをみましょうか。Regarding movies, shall we [you/we] watch? Using ません or ...


1

前の文の内容と - With the content of the previous sentence Noun + と - with(noun) 友達と - with friend 違うことがあると - If there is a difference jisho + と - if(verb) そこに行くとーIf you go there 付け加えて説明する - Add explanation 前の文の内容と違うことがあると付け加えて説明する。 literally it means If there is a difference With the content of the previous sentence Add explanation


1

臨む is 連体形 so the particle between it and ごとし has to be が. Still, 深淵に臨むよう and 深淵に臨むが如し is same meaning. Only the latter is saying difficulty and cool.


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