3

You are correct in your assumption, it is used like 「の」 in standard dialect. And like 「の」, it can be use in questions and answers. Q: 何ばしよっと? → 何をしてるの? A: ご飯作っとーと。 → ご飯作っているの。 Just be careful not to confuse it with the 「とー」 in the middle, which means 「ている」. You can find plenty of info in Japanese (like here or here) on the basics of Hakata dialect. which as ...


3

This に is a location-of-existence marker used with ある, いる, ない, etc. You probably know this already, but if you need a refresher, see: https://www.learn-japanese-adventure.com/arimasu-imasu-existence.html 記憶 is treated as a location, and そんなこと is the subject (は is omitted after そんなこと). Thus the literal translation is "There is no such thing in my memory&...


2

Don't worry, your translation is correct. Let's break it down one by one: Me(watashi) and my(to watashi no) girlfriend(kanojo) live in tokyo(wa tokyo ni sunde imasu). The reason you're repeating watashi twice is watashi and watashi no is entirely different. I know that it's not the best way to describe it, but it's not the same as saying she's my property(...


2

In this context, the の particle essentially turns the dictionary form of the verb 「見る」- to watch, into 「見るの」- watching, in the sense that it can now function as a noun in the sentence and become a subject or object. You will also often see 「こと」 used this way. So, yes, it is required. It is not the possessive の particle that you are thinking of, but a ...


2

は is often used in place of をto add emphasis to that specific object, in this case 僕 (no other than JUST me).


2

'昨日私のおじさんをてつだいました' is the correct one. Xをてつだいました when X is the object of 'help' 'にてつだいました' is possible as a sequence in other cases. See https://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/qa/question_detail/q10135898565 Also as a side note, '昨日おじさんをてつだいました' would be more usual (without '私の') if the helper is 'I'.


2

Afaik, we don't use spaces in any sentence, except at the beginning of a paragraph (However, this use is only seen in novels, textbooks, news articles, and newspapers). Instead, we use punctuation marks (句読点 | I know the English language has them too). I don't think 何時までですか would use 句読点, though. As for the comment of yours, it's very likely that such spaces ...


2

言ったのは少女のひとりだ is also a valid sentence. It is understood as a statement of a fact about a past event. 言ったのは少女のひとりだった means the same but it somewhat sounds like it is describing the time when that event happened. This is partially related. A similar question could be asked about the tense of a cleft sentence in English. I found this but it is closed as “too ...


1

This is a sentence about the parents' honeymoon, right? In this case, は is the natural choice because 両親 is the shared topic of both verbs (結婚した and 行きませんでした). The latter sentence is a little puzzling because it sounds like 行きませんでした has an implicit subject that is different from 両親. In general, use が when you want to specify a different subject in a ...


1

In ビルさんは日本語は簡単だと言いました, Bill is the one who said “Japanese is easy.” The statement clause is 日本語は簡単だ. (By the way, 簡単だ is not a verb but an adjective.) Similarly, Mike is the one who doesn’t know who will come in マイクさんはだれが来るか知りません. The original clause だれが来る is a question because it contains a question word だれ. と is the only correct choice in the practice ...


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