13

The verb is 捨てる, so its て-form is 捨てて, hence the compound form Vて+しまう becomes 捨ててしまう. If it were the casual ちゃう instead of しまう that you were using, that starts from the て-form too, but also contracts the て, so it would instead be 捨てちゃう, with just the one て. Perhaps that is where the confusion arose? Hope that helps!


12

「こそ」 is a particle whose main function is to emphasize and accentuate the preceding word or phrase. 「マイクさんこそプロの歌手みたいだったよ。」 thus means: "It was you, Mike, who was like a professional singer."


7

This is not the potential form of 持つ, but the 已然形 of 持つ plus the 終止形 of the 助動詞 り. In this case, the combination corresponds to modern Japanese 持っている.


7

I'm curious which dictionary you used to find that odd kana-ization? Searching for the kana string おたかくとまる over on Kotobank, a decent online dictionary aggregator sourcing from reputable native-language Japanese dictionaries, gives us several relevant pages. The Nihon Kokugo Dai Jiten entry for the 御高くとまる spelling includes the following sample sentence ...


5

彼は秘密を知られる It's the so-called 持ち主の受身(Possessor Passive?), a kind of 間接受身(Indirect Passive). [持ち主]が + [所有する物、体の一部など]を + 受身形の動詞 I think it's usually translated as "[Possessor] has [property, body part etc.] done". 彼の秘密が知られる His secret is known 彼は/が秘密を知られる He has his secret known (and he's inconvenienced) These basically have the same meaning, but ...


4

Or maybe rain always must be with [ga] and never with [wa]? If you want to simply say "it's raining", you have to use が. But you can use 雨は in the following situations: You really want a contrastive meaning, e.g. 雨は降っているが雪は降っていない. You refer to a certain rainfall episode that has been already brought into the universe of discourse, e.g., 雨は止んでいます ("The rain ...


3

It depends on what you actually do. 原発 (short for 原子力発電所) refers only to a nuclear power plant. If your specialty is to design or install a large machine to generate electricity, 原子力発電技術者 makes sense. 原子力 is nuclear power. If your job is related only to producing energy (power plant, atomic battery, etc), you can use 原子力技術者. If your specialty is more ...


3

While I'm not able to pin down your focus in the question, I guess you're having trouble understanding the function of は, in grammar and in mental model. You may have already heard about that は marks topic, which is not on the same level with subject, verb (predicate), or object. What does it actually mean? Think of a theater, where actors play as they ...


3

I would structurally translate this as: 人がいない場合でも水が流れることがあります。 There are times when the water will flow, even if it is the case where there is nobody (here). The N+でも construction expresses the same as Vて+も, なadj+でも いadj+くても, which indicates a 'reverse condition', usually translated to "even if" - i.e. explaining a scenario which is contrary to ...


3

でも means "even if/even though/but".It is contrastive, and it's the version of いadj + くても used with nouns and なadj: 寒【さむ】くても、ジャケットを着【き】ないででかけた。Even though it was cold, I left without wearing a jacket. 昨日【きのう】暇【ひま】でも、宿題しなかった。Even though I was free, I didn't do homework yesterday. So your sentence would mean "water flowing may exist even in the case ...


2

/group 1-1 / (-aる,-uる,-oる→って) 止まる(tomaru)+しまう=止まってしまう 売る(uru)+しまう=売ってしまう 取る(toru)+しまう=取ってしまう /group 1-2/ (-iる,-eる→て or って) 着る(kiru)+しまう=着てしまう 経る(heru)+しまう=経てしまう 止める(tomeru)+しまう=止めてしまう 切る(kiru)+しまう=切ってしまう 減る(heru)+しまう=減ってしまう /group 2/ -す→して 殺す(korosu)+しまう=殺してしまう 刺す(sasu)+しまう=刺してしまう /group 3/ -く,-ぐ→いて 書く(kaku)+しまう=書いてしまう 研ぐ(togu)+しまう=...


2

にて is simply a formal way of saying で (as in the particle for location or means). It's common in announcements and official documents. I don't know its linguistic history, but if you search the web you can occasionally see the name of this song translated as "In Zanarkand" or "At Zanarkand", which is more literally. I think "To Zanarkand" just sounds more ...


1

Did a quick concordance search on google and came up with ~420k hits for 原子力技術者 and ~25k for 原発技術者. The former also pulled up hits on job websites, so I'd go with that for your LinkedIn. You have a couple options for how to say where you work. You can say [Company]の原子力技術者, but I've also seen [occupation]@[Company] a lot of social media like Twitter.


1

There are good answers here, but I'll provide my parsing as well. I take the sentence and peel back the layers: 人がいない場合でも水が流れることがあります。 So then, adding some parentheses to group clauses: (人がいない場合でも水が流れる)ことがあります。 ([人がいない場合]でも[水が流れる])ことがあります。 We can translate ことがあります。 loosely as "the condition exists." or "the event exists." Putting this aside for ...


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