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3

This 出る is the third entry under #4 here. ある態度をとる。ある態度で相手に対する。 To take/adopt a (given) attitude/behavior/manner of acting. To face the person you're interacting with with a (given) attitude/behavior/manner of acting. In this case, the behavior that is being adopted is the entire sentence between ここは and に出よう. A 作戦, or strategy, typically comprises a ...


3

何もナシ means "(there is) nothing at all". 何も is a negative polarity item, which is always followed by a negation (ない, ぬ, ず, ...). Please see: The reason for using 何も+negative, but 何でも+positive This なし is a classic version of ない, but it is still used when brevity is important. Please see: What form is あり? なし on its own means "there is not", but 何も strengthens ...


2

許す means to forgive (or allow/permit/tolerate). ごめん means "sorry." 許す by itself doesn't mean "forgive me." Maybe you meant 許してください? If so, 許してください = "forgive me" and ごめん = "sorry." (As with all things language-related, there are about a million other things to be said on this topic, but judging from your level maybe this is the clearest explanation for ...


2

Is the stuff above correct? Looks good to me. But the real language is often more complicated and interrelated than the textbook, that is, I would call this ちゃう = てしまう an "opportunistic action", or some "I didn't expect it, but now there it is, so why don't" feeling. It'll be somewhere in between your #1 and #2. What does the 的な at the end of ...


2

優しさに乗る means to give in to/go along with someone's kindness. (NB: に乗る) The use of しまう here (乗ってしまう→乗っちゃう) conveys an acknowledgment of deriving benefit from someone. By giving in to your kindness, the speaker is gaining something. The しまおう form conveys an intention to do something. 的な is a slang version of みたいな, which, when used to end a sentence, can ...


2

Ok I made a mistake: I thought that the passive causative form was used with 詰む. But in fact, the verb was 詰まる with the causative and the dictionary gives: 言葉{ことば}に詰{つ}まる (exp,v5r) to be at a loss for words


2

(I know this is frowned upon, but given the comments I've received from the original poster, I've reworked my answer.) To me, replacing both of these "に" with "で" sounds off. As far as I've heard, "に" is usually taught as indicating the location at which something exists or the direction something moves in / its destination, and that you should use で for ...


2

Japanese is a very context-dependent language, so individual sentences can be hard to decode. Without more context, it looks like it's: "After this it's the house of the kid/girl named {feruto}, right?" 何々で合ってる? is a way of confirming information, roughly equivalent to "... right?"


2

This 感覚 is more like a no-adjective (except that it requires some modifier before it, like 様子). 彼はそういう感覚だ on its own means "He feels that way". そういう感覚の人 means "a person who feels that way". And this でいる (te-form of だ + いる) describes continuation ("He keeps/remains feeling so"). The usage of でいる is not different from that in 健康でいる ("to stay healthy"). See: ...


2

The programming group that wrote the censoring algorithm probably don't have native English speakers on board, either that or their voices are simply blatantly ignored. have => h__v : "av" is abbreviation for adult video nice => n___ : "ice" is another name for crystal meth. future => __t__e : "fu" = f__k you, not so sure about "ur" though. From ...


2

Yes, this is a fixed pattern that requires two も's. It's hard to explain "why", but Japanese も can be used twice to list two similar things (e.g., 国語も英語も得意です, 泣いても笑ってもこれで最後だ). Meaning of 「X 一緒なら Y 一緒」 What nuances do the も…ば…も structure carry? What is the grammar behind もなければ、なければ? JGram: も~ば~も What nuance would be different if は were to be used? Simply,...


1

If your language has a way to form impersonal sentences, that is it. Japanese grammar does not require marking of subject, thus you can make a sentence that describes a specific event without subject. In the case, what should stand as subject in other languages is undefined until further disambiguated by particles, honorifics, context, or explicit addition. ...


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