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12

「どうかと思う」 is a roundabout and indirect way of expressing one's somewhat negative opinion or impression of an action, situation, tendency, etc. It is indirect for using the word 「どうか」 ("how is it") instead of directly saying "I don't like it.", "I think it's bad.", etc. A more direct version of 「どうかと思う」 would be 「あまり感心{かんしん}しない」 ("I am not so impressed.") ...


6

Masu-stem of a verb often works as a noun. Here 頼みすぎ is a noun meaning something like "over-asking". Also note that 頼みすぎ is followed by な, which comes only after a noun or a na-adjective. 頼みすぎるなんだ is plain ungrammatical. Please check this list for the usage patterns of explanatory-な. Compare: 彼は食べ過ぎだ。 He is eating too much. (Literally "As for him, it'...


5

They have different structures as you've translated, and both forms are used as often as the other unlike English. If I reword them to be clearer: 食べないつもりです = I have an intention that: "I'm not going to eat (it)" 食べるつもりはないです = I have no such intention that: "I'm going to eat (it)" ...and don't forget: 食べるつもり(では/じゃ)ないです = I don't have an intention that: "...


4

彼は、自分のことは話そうとしない。 彼は、自分のことについて話すことがない。 His unwillingness is explicitly expressed in the first sentence. ~(よ)う is a volitional form, after all. Maybe he has some shady background he wants to hide. The second sentence is simply saying such a thing does not happen. It may be that he has nothing interesting to tell, or no one is interested in him.


4

This の is still explanatory-no used to seek clarification. A「いってきます。夜には戻るね。」 B「どこに行くの?」 In this case, の is almost mandatory because B is seeking the reason why A is leaving. You definitely have to learn how to use this の properly. It's still possible to drop this の, but it's very blunt and unrealistic in ordinary speech. A stereotyped tough guy like ...


3

1) 「寿司{すし}を食{た}べたことがある。」 2) 「寿司をもう食べた。」 The first sentence can only mean one thing and the second can mean two very different things. 1) can only mean "I have eaten sushi before." This person has already experienced eating sushi. The speaker, therefore, would almost always be a non-Japanese person. 2) can mean the exact same as 1) and an additional ...


2

Grammatically in your cases using or omitting だ does not make any difference. But Japaneses speakers use specific forms in specific situations, and it changes when the relationship between speakers changes. In both example, the question sentence and ううん is quite casual, and sounds like the speakers are female. Using a single だ for the end of a sentence ...


2

どう can, colloquially, be used to express one's opinion of a thing being "questionable", or "dubious", without outwardly nor directly criticizing it either. It takes this meaning when used more "affirmatively" in the sentence, a bit like interrogative words may take a critical meaning when put in rethorical questions in a language like English. In other ...


2

食べるつもりはないです/つもりはありません is usually safer and more natural. 食べないつもりです is grammatically perfectly correct, but it can sound direct and harsh. People tend to use the latter if they clearly want to express a concern or hatred about the food.


1

Because she omitted the part of the sentence. For example if she was giving apple(りんご)... りんごをセットで差し上げます ... is the correct way. "りんごをセットを" sounds weird. The example you have shown omitted the part "りんごを". That's the reason she says "セットで". In the web site you have shown, I believe で(2) is the closest usage. By the way, you can also say ... ...


1

When you persuade the listener to decide the destination, only どこに行く?works and you can't use the の version. On the other hand, どこに行くの? asks one who is seemingly going somewhere about the destination. In this case, you can use どこに行く? too.


1

Like mentioned in the comments you would use ように/ために. As for the question of how to combine this with adjectives and the copula you would normally use the adverbial form of the word in question. For example: 彼が安全にいられるようにこれを買った 美味しくするために塩を入れた For the copula you can use である (which is another form of the copula) but I think in most cases なる and いる does ...


1

This し simply means “and”. It means “Interpreter job can widen your view and make you grow.” や can’t replace し in this sentence because や can’t be after a verb or adjective. And し can’t be after a noun. Sometimes し means から(because). 今日は寒いし、外出はしたくない。 I don’t want to go out today because it’s clod. When し is used as から(because) like the example above,...


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