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7

事に is not placed at the end of the sentence. The full sentence is あまり物騒な事に首を突っ込んだらダメよ XXXに首を突っ込む is a set phrase. It means "to meddle into something." It is almost equivalent to English's "poke your nose into something that is none of your business." You can understand the sentence as It's bad to excessively poke your nose into ...


5

【で】 チーターは、地球上で、もっとも足の速い陸上動物だ。 で in this sentence doesn’t indicate a location where some action takes place. Its function is to delimit the scope of comparison. It is used in a sentence that expresses the comparative (“more”, “better”, etc.) or superlative (“most”, “best”, etc.) degree, such as this one, which contains the superlative adverb もっとも. Your ...


4

Here 「ところ」is just used metaphorically as a point in time or a juncture in events. Have you seen/heard something like: 恐怖が終わるところから人生が始まる Life begins where fear ends See, they even made a shirt with these words. 問題を知るところから始まる Just means: "(something) begins when the problem is understood." Possibly the omitted subject could be "our task"...


4

Well, the 連用形 of most verbs can be used as nouns (called 'deverbal nouns') and/or noun elements in compound nouns. Examples of deverbal nouns:「話(し)」「考え」「思い」「歩き」「泳ぎ」 (The list goes on and on.) Examples of noun elements in compounds:「思い出話」「素人考え」「親思い」「一人歩き」「背泳ぎ」(The list goes on and on.) 「任せ」 is not quite like the examples above, in that it is not normally ...


3

Grammatically, 学校任せ here should be understood as a noun/な-adjective. It has the same construction as 人任せ, which is listed in dictionaries as a noun/な-adjective. 子供の教育は学校任せにすべきじゃない。 has a slightly different nuance from 子供の教育は学校に任せるべきじゃない。 as 学校任せ, like 人任せ, has connotations of rather complete dependence.


3

飲めば, 言えば, etc. are conditional forms. [V cond. form]-いい literally means “if you do (the act of the verb), it will be good.” Since the speaker is asserting “it will be good” giving only one condition, I think it would be safe to say [V cond. form]-いい indeed has the implication of “only if”. Actually, it doesn’t always have the advice sense of “should.” ...


2

Without the context, 兄に確認される could be interpreted in two ways: either (1) the brother checks something, or (2) someone asks the brother to verify some information. In this particular case, the latter seems to be the case.


2

This ~かと思えば means something happens right after something. Or in this context, it describes two things are happening almost at the same time. Use of かと思ったら / かと思うと (in the context of as soon as, just when) 【JLPT N2 Grammar】〜かと思うと / 〜かと思えば / 〜かと思ったら Learn JLPT N2 Grammar: かと思ったら/かと思うと (ka to omottara/ka to omou to)


2

〜てきた and 〜てきている are not much different. They are mostly interchangeable. However, I detect a slight difference in that the former seems to focus on the changes or experiences the subject (Ryoko in your example) has undergone, while the latter seems to focus on a certain property the subject has taken on through those changes or experiences. Ryoko is a ...


2

In a case like this, there is not much difference between 潜って(は)きた and 潜ってきて(は)いる. Both sentence say nothing about the future. But the more important the result of this event in the past is now, the more often the ている form will be chosen. See my previous answer here: Why is a verb in the past (た形) contradicted with ~ていない? On the other hand, ていた is the "...


2

Not sure if you've noticed but there is a similar phrase that occurs in your video clip prior to the line you are asking about. A: そんなに笑うことないだろ B: だって、お前初デートで本屋はないだろ These two lines employ similar grammar structures. 「することはない」means there is no need to do something. See this answer for example. You didn't ask about this construction so I guess you may be ...


1

I've also read that the te-form of intransitive verbs with いる describe a state that holds after said change occurs. As a native speaker, I can say that this definition is correct but too narrow in scope; the case you raised with 泣いている is perfectly valid. I would map "ている" to english persent-perfect form, "has been" "have been". ...


1

I see much more “thankfulness” in the second sentence than in the first. The first sentence is an indirect and supposedly humble-sounding way of saying 自分ですることにしました. Often times the speaker is not thankful or anything (although there may be cases when they really are). This use of させてもらう is often heard particularly in business settings. I personally don’t ...


1

For a quick equivalency, think of させてもらう as "take liberty of" "I took liberty of turning your photo to the correct orientation to make it easier to view" 見やすいように写真の向きを修正させてもらった。


1

最近とても疲れやすいので、その日の体調いかんでは________ I answered it with : 会社を休むこともある This is not wrong gramatically, but logically doesn't follow if I get a little nit-picky. I will explain. Your teacher's 会社を休むかもしれない ...is better for sure. The reason why is that you started wtih 最近 which, as you know, is "Lately, these days." So, what follows has to be converstaion ...


1

As stated above, your use of である, up to that point, is okay. The problem lies with the rest. I'd rephrease as: お金持ちであるだけでは、幸せにはなれない。 Being rich by itself, won't make you happy. To answer your question, as to why it's wrong, I'll try to show where you've gone off the rails by showing you the literal translation of what you got. お金持ちであることは幸せな人生を送るわけではない。 The ...


1

That's a little bit hard question, because any language is so big that very often we can find extremely rare, but still possible exception. Generally, I would say in a phrase only one は can be thematic. The idea of the topic is to disambiguate. Any sentence has content which we want to say and some area to which it belongs. For example, if we provide only ...


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