21

Yes, 雷 refers to both the lightning and the sound caused by it. If you need to distinguish, the specific term for the visible discharge of the light is 稲妻【いなずま】, and the specific word for the sound is 雷鳴【らいめい】. Although these words often appear in news media and scientific papers, we usually just use 雷 in everyday conversations. As for the last two ...


18

This よって is the te-form of よる, which is an auxiliary verb that expresses disdain. Compared to やがる, よる sounds relatively old or dialectal. See this and this. The te-form is sometimes used with an irritating voice to point out someone's bad or surprising behavior (I could not find the relevant definition in monolingual dictionaries). For example, a mom may say ...


17

It is exactly as you say. 「~~をする」 can mean "to have ~~ (as a natural characteristic)" and it is usually used in the form 「~~をしている」,「~~をしていた」 or 「~~をした」. The "dictionary" form 「~~をする」 would not be used in a real-life situation; It is only found in dictionaries or a place like this where grammar or vocabulary is discussed. Among those forms,...


15

「Verb + てやる」 has two (very) different meanings/usages. 1) To offer to do something in a patronizing or condescending tone as to demand gratitude. 2) To (proactively) perform an action so as to prove one's ability to others. OP seems to be talking about #2 above. My own example sentences: 1) 「[心配]{しんぱい}するな。1[年]{ねん}くらいオレが[食]{た}べさせてやる。」 = "Don't worry. I'...


15

As shown in @choco's comment above, 「[国]{くに}」 in this context means "one's birthplace", "home province", etc. It is mostly used when one is staying far away from where one was born and raised but is still in the same country/nation. When I am in another prefecture, I am sometimes asked 「国はどこ?」,「お国はどちらですか。」, etc. to which I reply 「[名古屋]{なごや}です」. So, 「...


15

During the Edo period, villages traditionally had 10 communal activities: 冠 - 成人式 - coming of age ceremony 婚 - marriage 建築 - helping with building/repairing 病気 - helping when sick 水害 - helping during flooding/water damage 旅行 - travel 出産 - giving birth 年忌 - death anniversaries 葬式 - funeral service 火事 - fire fighting However, when ...


13

生活【せいかつ】 is English life, livelihood, or living; day-to-day activities of people. 命【いのち】 is life; it's something we lose when we die. Synonyms: 生【せい】、生命【せいめい】 生気【せいき】 is more like liveliness, spirit, or energy. Synonyms: 元気【げんき】、活力【かつりょく】 一生【いっしょう】 is a whole life of someone. Synonym: 生涯【しょうがい】 人生【じんせい】 is human's (whole) life; use this only for humans, ...


13

取り寄せるのに1日から2日は見ておいたほうがいいからね。 You know, (expect) it takes at least one day or two before the product arrives (to our office/department). This 見る is "to expect", "to estimate", etc. See the tenth definition here. 1日 and 2日 refer to the time length between the order and the arrival. The ついたち/いちにち distinction is special and important, but ふつか, みっか and so ...


12

It's 「ウヨク」,「[右翼]{うよく}」 "the right wing". ウヨクの方の、中国、韓国嫌いは異常。 "The right wingers' hatred toward China and Korea is unusual/insane."


12

うきよ was originally 憂き世 ("this melancholic/miserable world") but reanalyzed as 浮き世 ("this transient/fleeting world") around the Edo period. It was associated with sadness and ethical corruption at first, but later it came to mean "secular part of our world" or simply "this modern world." It also gained associations with ...


12

「管{くだ}を巻{ま}く」 is an idiomatic expression meaning: "to talk incoherently (when drunk)" "to grumble on and on (when drunk)" I might add that repeating the same things over and over is often the characteristic of 管を巻く-ing.


12

バカが: "You fool!" が: not a subject marker but a vocative-like particle; see this ガード: [noun] "guard" (in this context, refers to psychological defense or skepticism against the seducer) がばがば: [onomatopoeic na-adj] describes how something is wide open, very loose or leaky に: destination/target marker ("to") なっから: colloquialism for なるから (forget the little-...


11

制限 has a feel of externally imposed man-made restriction, such as "speed limit" (速度制限), "my doctor isn't letting me drink" (医者に飲酒を制限されている). In contrast, 限界 isn't an external limitation but rather because of inability or lack of capability. "this car can only go up to 75mph" (この車は120km/h位が限界) "I can't run more than 5km" (僕は走るのは5kmが限界) 限度 is closer to 制限. ...


11

As a noun Only 怒り【いかり】 stands as a noun anger, rage, fury etc. (Accent in Tokyo: いかり{LHH}) As a verb gerund (連用形) It's basically a matter of distinction between おこる and いかる. Both mean "to get angry, mad or furious", but: おこる is more colloquial and tends to describe anger towards real experiences ex. おこりっぽい、おこりんぼ etc. いかる is more literary and tends to ...


11

[長]{なげ}え is a colloquial, masculine and a bit vulgar way of pronouncing [長]{なが}い. (Compare: うるさい→うるせえ, しらない→しらねえ, たべたい→たべてえ) The と in 長いと is a 接続助詞(conjunctive particle), meaning "if~~" or "when~~". So the なげえと(長いと) here means "If (your hair is) long" or "When (your hair is) long". バッサリいこうぜ!うっとうしいだろ長えとよ。(≒長いとうっとうしいだろ。) Let's cut it short. (Because) It'...


11

"What is 学校" is not an easy question; there are many definitions of it. but here's the summary: Legally speaking, "the narrow definition" of 学校 (aka 一条校), as defined in the first clause of the law called 学校教育法, includes public and private 小学校, 中学校, 高校, 大学, and so on. And it also does include kindergartens (!) but does not include so-called 大学校. Broader ...


11

There is no one-size-fits-all solution. It depends on how you want to use this word. ウィアブー or ウィーアブー is not something an average Japanese speaker would understand, and that's why it's not on jisho.org. It's a transliteration rather than a translation. Still, if you want to write an article about the concept of weeaboo in Japanese, you'll probably want to ...


10

マラソン by its own strictly means running 42.195 km, as long as it is used as the name of professional athletic competitions. For example, "10000m走" (10,000 metres) is never マラソン. 長距離走【ちょうきょりそう】 is the generic term which corresponds to "long-distance running" (usually >= 5 km), which of course includes マラソン. When it comes to amateur events or PE classes at ...


10

"Beautiful" is surely included in the meaning of 「うららか」, but its more important base meaning is "spring-like" ("printanier" in your language). In the world of haiku, 「うららか」 simply means "spring" itself. A very beautiful day in any other seasons would usually not be described as 「うららか」by native speakers regardless of how beautiful the day is. It just feels ...


9

てんとてん is not one word. It is [点]{てん}と[点]{てん}は[線]{せん}になる, or, "two points make a line", or even "dots form/make a line". [点]{てん}と[点]{てん}を[結]{むす}ぶ means "to connect two points", or even "connect the dots". UPDATE 1 I think you are just hearing せんになる as せぃになる, because んに isn't always enunciated when people are speaking (kind of like American English "wanted ...


9

Both ひとまえ and にんまえ exist. 人前【ひとまえ】:(noun) public place; front of the audience. 人前【にんまえ】: (counter) portion of, often for meal. 1 serving = 1人前【にんまえ】. 人前【じんぜん】(式【しき】) : (noun) A certain irreligious style of wedding, as opposed to Christian-, Shinto-, or Buddhism-style weddings.


8

It is an onomatopoeia, not the name for an object unless the author/speaker uses it as such for his own aesthetic purposes but this would be fairly rare. It describes the way a long object dangles, stretches, lies down, etc. in a lazy manner. The long object coud actually be anything from linguini to a cat stretching its body, from hair to stretching ...


8

Japanese can form compound verbs readily, and only a subset of them end up in dictionaries, usually after they've been lexicalized (reinterpreted as a single element) and especially if they've been idiomatized (given an idiomatic meaning you can't figure out from the individual elements, like 落ち着く). In particular, certain verbs compound very readily as ...


8

It is a metaphor (unless the song is actually about buttons) used to describe an interpersonal relationship. 「ボタンを[掛]{か}け[違]{ちが}う」 is a fairly common metaphor meaning "to have small misunderstandings", "to be at cross purposes", "to fail to move closely together", "to continuously have little disagreements", etc. 「掛け違ったボタンは[直]{す}ぐほつれた」 might be difficult ...


8

It's for polite use by both genders, and the most generally used first-person pronoun. While it used to be more for women, this is no longer the case. It is true that women tend to use わたし (watashi) more than other pronouns, but it is not a feminine pronoun†, and it is frequently used by men. It is more polite than others and also used more generally. ...


7

You're right that there is technically some ambiguity, although slightly wrong in your interpretation. In a sentence like 6時に起こしてください it's basically implied that you mean yourself, as in the provided translation ("Please wake me up"). Without context, though, there's no way to be 100% sure. It could be a request to wake up any other person (except the person ...


7

It is unambiguous that the wife is the one who would be doing the warning, and this sentence is being spoken to her, by the boss, who is directly asking her to caution her husband. The function of から is really very similar to "from" in English, as in going from point A to point B, last from time A to time B, being made from something, and others, but ...


7

According to Wikipedia and this article, 従伯叔父【いとこおじ】 (male) or 従伯叔母【いとこおば】 (female) may be the specific words you're looking for. However, anything further than いとこ (cousin), おじ/おば (uncle/aunt) is rarely used in ordinary Japanese except for はとこ (second cousin). So you should just say "母のいとこ", "母のいとこの母", etc. as long as you want to make yourself understood ...


7

法律 is the general word for "law", as in 「法律を守る」(obey the law),「法律で禁止されている」(forbidden by law) or 「渡辺法律事務所」(Watanabe Law Firm). I believe that the most common use of 法度【はっと】 is to mean "something that is terribly bad manners", and that it's almost always used with ご in front — 「ご法度」. A quick Web search found: 新郎・新婦の恋愛遍歴話はご法度:...


7

ばり is an uncommon 接尾語 which means "like". http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/leaf/jn2/180011/m0u/ ばり【張り】[接尾] 2 名詞や人名を表す語の下に付いて、それに似ている、または、それに似せているという意を表す。「西鶴―の文」「左翼―の主張」 So 「林家パー子ばりのアンテナ」 is "an antenna just like (that of) 林家パー子". She is known for the pink dress and the fondness for gossiping, so アンテナ here means "ability to find something interesting, or ...


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