20

Say what? Putting aside the fact that this sounds like a whitewashed description of sexual assault, at what point in history was this "practice" so common that it was given a name? I don't know when it started, but the word originally comes from [呼ばう]{よばう} and is more commonly written as [夜這い]{よばい}. It is an old Japanese custom that was common up until the ...


20

Yes, 雷 refers to both the lightning and the sound caused by it. If you need to distinguish, the specific term for the visible discharge of the light is 稲妻【いなずま】, and the specific word for the sound is 雷鳴【らいめい】. Although these words often appear in news media and scientific papers, we usually just use 雷 in everyday conversations. As for the last two ...


16

The PR does indeed stand for public relations. In English it is almost exclusively a business term used to represent a companies goals to persuade the public, employees, and other stakeholders to maintain a certain point of view about it, its leadership, products, etc. In Japanese it has the same meaning, only it can be applied to areas other than business....


15

本日 is keigo. You will hear this on a train or airplane, or in a store. But you won't be saying it yourself, unless if you as a beginning student are put in the unlikely position of making an official announcement to someone. 今日 is what you would use in ordinary situations.


15

During the Edo period, villages traditionally had 10 communal activities: 冠 - 成人式 - coming of age ceremony 婚 - marriage 建築 - helping with building/repairing 病気 - helping when sick 水害 - helping during flooding/water damage 旅行 - travel 出産 - giving birth 年忌 - death anniversaries 葬式 - funeral service 火事 - fire fighting However, when ...


14

取り寄せるのに1日から2日は見ておいたほうがいいからね。 You know, (expect) it takes at least one day or two before the product arrives (to our office/department). This 見る is "to expect", "to estimate", etc. See the tenth definition here. 1日 and 2日 refer to the time length between the order and the arrival. The ついたち/いちにち distinction is special and important, but ふつか, みっか and so ...


13

In my feeling, those sound quite different. 世間 : the Japanese society.   ex. "世間の常識" = common sense of our society. 世界 : the whole world on the globe. Particularly outside of Japan.   ex. "世界のニュース" = international news. "世界一周" = a round-the-world trip. In short, "世間" sounds like more local stuff. is it (浮世{うきよ}) strictly poetic and reserved for ...


13

Strictly speaking, 鍵{かぎ} is key and 錠{じょう} is lock. However, in daily speech, 錠 is hardly ever used. Usually, people will say 鍵 to mean either key or lock, and the context will make it clear which one it is. However, the じょう reading does appear in several common combinations: 施錠{せじょう} (to) lock 開錠{かいじょう} unlock 南京錠{なんきんじょう} padlock


12

The way I understand it is that 錠{じょう} is generally used for "lock" and 鍵{かぎ} for "key". 鍵 can mean "lock" in some contexts however (this is almost certainly incomplete): 鍵を掛ける - to lock (something)(literally something like "turn a key on (something)") 鍵が掛かっている/鍵が掛かった - (something) is locked 鍵を開ける - to unlock (something) 鍵を取り付ける - "install a lock"...


12

生活【せいかつ】 is English life, livelihood, or living; day-to-day activities of people. 命【いのち】 is life; it's something we lose when we die. Synonyms: 生【せい】、生命【せいめい】 生気【せいき】 is more like liveliness, spirit, or energy. Synonyms: 元気【げんき】、活力【かつりょく】 一生【いっしょう】 is a whole life of someone. Synonym: 生涯【しょうがい】 人生【じんせい】 is human's (whole) life; use this only for humans, ...


12

It's 「ウヨク」,「[右翼]{うよく}」 "the right wing". ウヨクの方の、中国、韓国嫌いは異常。 "The right wingers' hatred toward China and Korea is unusual/insane."


11

「金」 in 「引{ひ}き金{がね}」 does not represent "money" but "metal". "Metal" is translated as 「金属{きんぞく}」 and "metal fittings" are translated as 「金具{かなぐ}」. 「引き金」 is the part of a gun that is made of metal and is for triggering the gun to fire. In English, "trigger" also means the part of a gun as a noun, and "to cause something" as a verb. References: かな‐ぐ【金具】 ...


11

制限 has a feel of externally imposed man-made restriction, such as "speed limit" (速度制限), "my doctor isn't letting me drink" (医者に飲酒を制限されている). In contrast, 限界 isn't an external limitation but rather because of inability or lack of capability. "this car can only go up to 75mph" (この車は120km/h位が限界) "I can't run more than 5km" (僕は走るのは5kmが限界) 限度 is closer to 制限. ...


11

As a noun Only 怒り【いかり】 stands as a noun anger, rage, fury etc. (Accent in Tokyo: いかり{LHH}) As a verb gerund (連用形) It's basically a matter of distinction between おこる and いかる. Both mean "to get angry, mad or furious", but: おこる is more colloquial and tends to describe anger towards real experiences ex. おこりっぽい、おこりんぼ etc. いかる is more literary and tends to ...


11

[長]{なげ}え is a colloquial, masculine and a bit vulgar way of pronouncing [長]{なが}い. (Compare: うるさい→うるせえ, しらない→しらねえ, たべたい→たべてえ) The と in 長いと is a 接続助詞(conjunctive particle), meaning "if~~" or "when~~". So the なげえと(長いと) here means "If (your hair is) long" or "When (your hair is) long". バッサリいこうぜ!うっとうしいだろ長えとよ。(≒長いとうっとうしいだろ。) Let's cut it short. (Because) It'...


10

ari-ki is the verb ar- "be, are" plus the recollectional past suffix -ki. The recollectional sense is all but lost and is essentially just a past tense now. -ki is not used much in modern Japanese except for fossilized patterns such as ariki and omoiki ya. ariki means that something was there; essentially atta. Your examples: mazu wa keturon ariki: This ...


10

マラソン by its own strictly means running 42.195 km, as long as it is used as the name of professional athletic competitions. For example, "10000m走" (10,000 metres) is never マラソン. 長距離走【ちょうきょりそう】 is the generic term which corresponds to "long-distance running" (usually >= 5 km), which of course includes マラソン. When it comes to amateur events or PE classes at ...


10

"What is 学校" is not an easy question; there are many definitions of it. but here's the summary: Legally speaking, "the narrow definition" of 学校 (aka 一条校), as defined in the first clause of the law called 学校教育法, includes public and private 小学校, 中学校, 高校, 大学, and so on. And it also does include kindergartens (!) but does not include so-called 大学校. Broader ...


10

うきよ was originally 憂き世 ("this melancholic/miserable world") but reanalyzed as 浮き世 ("this transient/fleeting world") around the Edo period. It was associated with sadness and ethical corruption at first, but later it came to mean "secular part of our world" or simply "this modern world." It also gained associations with mass culture and eroticism. (I did not ...


9

阿月地区を東西二つに分けて means "separate the Azuki district into two parts, east and west". You could insert a の, making it 東西の二つ, but the adverbial use without it is not uncommon for these "listing"-jukugo like 東西, 優劣, 大小 etc.


9

てんとてん is not one word. It is [点]{てん}と[点]{てん}は[線]{せん}になる, or, "two points make a line", or even "dots form/make a line". [点]{てん}と[点]{てん}を[結]{むす}ぶ means "to connect two points", or even "connect the dots". UPDATE 1 I think you are just hearing せんになる as せぃになる, because んに isn't always enunciated when people are speaking (kind of like American English "wanted ...


8

Short answer: Both readings have the same meaning. Whether you consider かいしゅん as a valid reading of 買春 or not depends on what you count as “valid.” Some Sino-Japanese words have not only an on reading which is shown in dictionaries as the primary reading but also an alternative reading which avoids ambiguity with some other words. 買春 is such a word. ...


8

Without knowing the entire sentence, this looks like a 〜上 meaning "from the viewpoint/standpoint of 〜". I talked about the meaning of this in this thread, so I'll defer you there for a more complete explanation. Basically sounds like "From the viewpoint/In terms of the Harbour Act 〜". Actually, in this case, I think "Under the Habour Act" (as you ...


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