32

No, やれ{HL}やれ{HL} is not an onomatopoeia but an interjection. It doesn't symbolize any sound or state, and cannot used like other onomatopoeiae: × やれやれという音を立てて × やれやれした様子で But as you said, it's true that this word has no fixed translation in English. For example, Haruki Murakami is known to use this expression repeatedly as one of his signature style, ...


31

ちょっと待ってて (chotto matte te) literally means "Keep waiting for a while (please)." That て (te) at the end does not mean "I'll be back shortly", at least grammatically. ちょっと (chotto) just means "for a while", "a little", etc. 待ってて (matte te) is constructed as follows: 待つ (matsu): simple intransitive verb, "to wait" 待って (matte): te-form of 待つ 待っている (matte iru): ...


22

Repeating the same noun twice as inNounというNoun here has the meaning of "all" (definition #5 at Daijisen): …窓という窓が夕日に照らされて赤くキラキラ輝いている。 "...all of the windows are being shined on by the evening sun and are sparkling red." Separately, Time NounというTime Noun can also emphasize time words, but that's a different usage (definition #4 at Daijisen), e.g.: ...


22

I think the この通り means (or, comes from) something like 「この通り、謝ります(だから許してください)。」 "I'm apologizing like this / as you see (so please forgive me)" or 「この通り、お願いします(だから頼みを聞いてください)。」 "I am begging you like this / as you see (so please do me a favor)." This phrase is used when you apologize someone or ask a favor of someone, and you'd usually say it while ...


15

In this case, it would be read as [一日]{いち・にち} which just means "(one) day" as opposed to [一日]{≪ついたち≫} which means first of the month. My gut says that in this case 一日 is acting like "your day" in particular, trying to evoke your subjective answer of how it was in particular for you. If she had just asked you 「どんな[日]{ひ}でしたか?」, it would sound to me like a ...


14

もしもし is like "Hello" and it's used in two kinds of situations: As the very first word of the call ("Hello, this is Tanaka speaking.") As the word to check if the other person can hear you, when the line is noisy or unstable ("Hello? Hello? Can you hear me?") In video calls, you can still safely use もしもし in the second situation. In the first sense, and in a ...


14

The most common phrase would be: 見てるだけです。(Literally: "I'm just looking.") I think you could also reply like this: 店員:何かお探しですか?(Are you looking for anything in particular?)    客:いえ、だいじょうぶです。(No, I'm okay.)


13

"Teach" in this case is simply "tell" -- i.e., "inform someone of something they did not know previously". As to why folks in Japan use 教える instead of 伝える or some other verb, that may have to be chalked up to cultural, historical, and linguistic differences. ADDENDUM: By way of example of "cultural, historical, and linguistic differences", it bears noting ...


13

You can add focus particles like は or も to verbs, but in order to do so, you have to split the verb into two parts so that the particle has some place to go. We'll split the verb into its continuative stem (called 連用形 in Japanese) and the verb する. For example:   忘れる   → 忘れ+する   忘れる+も = 忘れもする Or:   忘れない   → 忘れ+しない   忘れない+は = 忘れはしない Your example is a ...


12

~くて is not an ending for a verb, it is the ~て form of an i-adjective. In your case the i-adjective formed by the verb 会う + the ending ~たい, where the ending ~たい is translated as "to want to". The ~て form of a verb, adjective or noun is used as a connective, which can sometimes be translated simply as "and", but sometimes this "and" can be interpreted to give ...


12

パンドラの箱を開ける Sorry if you expected something cooler. You can say this in Japanese and be understood, however the norm might be to phrase it in a more direct way. http://eow.alc.co.jp/search?q=Pandora%27s+box&ref=sa If you want a more Japanese equivalent, this entry from the link above has a few alternatives: open a Pandora's box パンドラの箱を開ける、...


12

I would say the expression お世話になりました is spot on. Especially since you are trying to express gratitude for guidance, which is contained in the word 世話 "looking after; help; aid; assistance". Moreover, お世話になりました is formal and certainly suitable for a corporate environment. To adapt it to your situation, you could say, e.g. 長い間お世話になりました。


12

やれ、やれ is an interjection often uttered when ① you are relieved from a burden or mental pressure, or ② when you have some burden or a little problem ahead, for example: ①やれやれ、[一仕事]{ひとしごと}終わった - Oh boy, I’ve finished this job. やれやれ、やっと[飯]{めし}が[炊]{た}けた - Here we go! Rice is done. やれやれ、借金も終わって[肩]{かた}の[荷]{に}が[下]{お}りた - Thank God. I settled the loans. I'm now ...


12

I'm afraid to say that いつしも is very rare, and you can use it naturally only in literary sentences. ~しも was a grammatical element in archaic Japanese (it was a kind of intensifier similar to nothing but, even, necessarily, etc), but in modern Japanese it's not possible to combine an arbitrary word with it. You will find しも only in the following fixed ...


12

If the scenario were saying "I don't want anything" in response to someone offering you something (food, drink, etc.), you could also use (私は)[結構]{けっ・こう}です。 → I'm fine/all right.


12

Japanese よい/いい/よろしい sometimes means "... is not necessary" or "fine without ..." コーヒーはいいです。 (Thank you but) I don't want coffee. いや、いいです。 No thanks. / I don't need it. (e.g., to a salesperson) その話はもういい。 That's enough! 言い訳はよろしい。 Don't make excuses. Therefore, "ポイントカードはよろしいですか?" means something like "You don't want to use a point card, right?" ...


11

いったい is not rude unless you make it rude. It has no inherent rudeness within it, but because it carries a fairly strong notion that one doesn't know what's going on, it can be seen as rude if you direct it at someone to express frustration. Like you say, I always liken it to the English phrase "on Earth," as in "What on Earth are you doing here?" This ...


11

I applaud your courage to try something new and more sophisticated, when you can so easily use some safe & mandane expressions like お久しぶり! Unfortunately, things like this entirely depend on the context and what your perceived character is to the other person, for there's always some context in which almost any expression is appropriate. For example, if ...


11

Culturally, Japanese people are not as publicly direct about their deepest feelings. In English speaking cultures, we use the phrase "I love you" a LOT. It can be for an intimate relationship, or it can be used for a best friend with no romantic undertones. You won't hear the Japanese people say 愛している the same way Americans tend to use the English ...


10

I think that どうやって is a method, whereas [何]{なに}で is asking for "by means of what?". So, for your example どうやって作文を書いたんですか asks for the whole process for you to be able to have written your essay. E.g. what sources did you read? What parts are you quoting? How are you organizing your references? etc. 何で作文を書いたの? should be answered "by hand" or "I ...


10

You wouldn't use "どうか" standing by itself. Added to a request (like てください), I think it adds a nuance of a strong request/entirety/petition. どうか許{ゆる}してください - please forgive me どうか、息子{むすこ}を - please (help/save/look after) my son (sentence with verb dropped) By comparison, どうぞ can be used in an invitation/offering sort of sense (please have a seat/please ...


10

無理しないでください is one very common way of saying something along the lines of "don't do more than you can". It's also used to mean "don't wear yourself out" in a physical sense, but can be used in virtually any context.


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