30

ちょっと待ってて (chotto matte te) literally means "Keep waiting for a while (please)." That て (te) at the end does not mean "I'll be back shortly", at least grammatically. ちょっと (chotto) just means "for a while", "a little", etc. 待ってて (matte te) is constructed as follows: 待つ (matsu): simple intransitive verb, "to wait" 待って (matte): te-form of 待つ 待っている (matte iru): ...


27

No, やれ{HL}やれ{HL} is not an onomatopoeia but an interjection. It doesn't symbolize any sound or state, and cannot used like other onomatopoeiae: × やれやれという音を立てて × やれやれした様子で But as you said, it's true that this word has no fixed translation in English. For example, Haruki Murakami is known to use this expression repeatedly as one of his signature style, ...


22

As a native speaker, I would say: 剣道をがんばっている。 or 剣道でがんばっている。 But, these are a little bit colloquial. When I want to be more formal, I will say: 剣道に励んでいる。 or, simply, いっしょうけんめい剣道をしている。


22

Repeating the same noun twice as inNounというNoun here has the meaning of "all" (definition #5 at Daijisen): …窓という窓が夕日に照らされて赤くキラキラ輝いている。 "...all of the windows are being shined on by the evening sun and are sparkling red." Separately, Time NounというTime Noun can also emphasize time words, but that's a different usage (definition #4 at Daijisen), e.g.: ...


21

I think the この通り means (or, comes from) something like 「この通り、謝ります(だから許してください)。」 "I'm apologizing like this / as you see (so please forgive me)" or 「この通り、お願いします(だから頼みを聞いてください)。」 "I am begging you like this / as you see (so please do me a favor)." This phrase is used when you apologize someone or ask a favor of someone, and you'd usually say it while ...


17

Your book is correct. When talking about human body temperature, 三十 is often omitted, probably because it is obvious. While there is nothing wrong with saying 37度8分 (37.8 degrees Celsius), it is often abbreviated to 7度8分. Even 37度 (37 degrees Celsius) without a fractional part sometimes becomes 7度. You cannot abbreviate the temperature when it is 40 ...


16

いかない is less often a problem as it's derived from 行く, but いけない can be both the negative potential form of the verb 行く "to go" and the negative form of the verb 行ける "to be good (at)/to go well/to be acceptable." 6 Therefore いかない and いけない may appear to be similar, but they can actually be totally different. いかない "won't go/doesn't go" from 行く: ~わけにはいかない: ...


15

「[Noun] + 仕立{した}て」 means: "(made) in the [Noun] style" 「ビアホール」 is an establishment where people gather for the main purpose of drinking draft beer. When I first saw your question, I was going to say that 「ビアホール」 was a 和製英語{わせいえいご} (= "an English word created by Japanese"), but I have found this place in the U.S., so I am not sure: https://www....


15

In this case, it would be read as [一日]{いち・にち} which just means "(one) day" as opposed to [一日]{≪ついたち≫} which means first of the month. My gut says that in this case 一日 is acting like "your day" in particular, trying to evoke your subjective answer of how it was in particular for you. If she had just asked you 「どんな[日]{ひ}でしたか?」, it would sound to me like a ...


14

The most common phrase would be: 見てるだけです。(Literally: "I'm just looking.") I think you could also reply like this: 店員:何かお探しですか?(Are you looking for anything in particular?)    客:いえ、だいじょうぶです。(No, I'm okay.)


14

If you are looking for a slang term used in business that actually feels like "ASAP", we have: 「なる早{はや}」 which is short for 「なるべく早く」. You can say: 「なる早でお願{ねが}いします。」 or just 「なる早で!」


13

As @sawa answered earlier, it means "like this" or "in this way". For future reference, 〜通り{どおり} can also be used in many places: 教科書通り{きょうかしょどおり} → by the book 憲法通り{けんぽうどおり} → by the constitution 規則通り{きそくどおり} → by the rules


13

While both ~必要がある and ~なくてはいけない are used to express that something is necessary or must be done, they are both used slightly differently. Take for example the following sentances: コンピュータを再起動する必要があります。 You need to restart the computer. コンピュータを再起動しなくてはいけません。 You/I/etc must restart the computer. In the above sentances 必要があります is less personal ...


13

Greetings on the internet are largely the same as those that would be done on the phone or in person. こんにちは with be fine for a friend etc お疲れ様です would be fine for a work colleage はじめまして for someone you are meeting of the first time. うっす is even acceptable for very casual situations.


13

"Teach" in this case is simply "tell" -- i.e., "inform someone of something they did not know previously". As to why folks in Japan use 教える instead of 伝える or some other verb, that may have to be chalked up to cultural, historical, and linguistic differences. ADDENDUM: By way of example of "cultural, historical, and linguistic differences", it bears noting ...


13

もしもし is like "Hello" and it's used in two kinds of situations: As the very first word of the call ("Hello, this is Tanaka speaking.") As the word to check if the other person can hear you, when the line is noisy or unstable ("Hello? Hello? Can you hear me?") In video calls, you can still safely use もしもし in the second situation. In the first sense, and in a ...


12

The meaning is the same. If we compare できるだけ and できる限り, できる限り (literally “to the limit one can”) sounds stronger than できるだけ (literally “as much as one can”), so the nuance is slightly different, but not much. While onteria_’s answer and the answers on Goo to which it links have some points, I think that they are describing the difference between the two ...


12

早速ですが has a nuance of making an excuse for jumping to the main point directly, where some might expect a bit of smalltalk or an introduction beforehand. Whereas では or じゃ are pretty neutral like "Well", 早速ですが would probably be translated like "Let's get right down to business", "Let me get straight to the point" or "Sorry for being a bit rushed". Or ...


12

パンドラの箱を開ける Sorry if you expected something cooler. You can say this in Japanese and be understood, however the norm might be to phrase it in a more direct way. http://eow.alc.co.jp/search?q=Pandora%27s+box&ref=sa If you want a more Japanese equivalent, this entry from the link above has a few alternatives: open a Pandora's box パンドラの箱を開ける、...


12

If the scenario were saying "I don't want anything" in response to someone offering you something (food, drink, etc.), you could also use (私は)[結構]{けっ・こう}です。 → I'm fine/all right.


11

After some very depressing searches (people are living with a lot of sad things), I did locate a few instances of this phrase used in a positive light. In her Ameba profile, one woman stated 「なんとなく生きる中で見つけられた幸せを大切に抱えて生きたい」 ("I want to hold dear the happiness I have somehow been able to find while living"). In a tweet, someone said 「不安を抱えるより、希望を抱えて、生きたい」 ("I ...


11

It is relatively gentle, and a good way of allaying fears or dispelling misconceptions. お邪魔みたいですので、これで失礼しますね… It seems like I'm interrupting you, so I'll see myself out... そんなこと(は)ないですよ Not at all! / Don't be silly! / No such thing! かなり怖い人だそうですけど… I heard he's quite a scary person... そんなことない Not at all. If by your last question you mean can the ...


11

As a generic you can't go wrong with こんにちは. For example on Facebook or twitter I see posts by companies often that start with こんにちは. It depends on the context, of course, so if there's a situation where time of day is just understood then you can use that greeting. Or you can give a twist to it and start with ハロー!


11

いったい is not rude unless you make it rude. It has no inherent rudeness within it, but because it carries a fairly strong notion that one doesn't know what's going on, it can be seen as rude if you direct it at someone to express frustration. Like you say, I always liken it to the English phrase "on Earth," as in "What on Earth are you doing here?" This ...


11

~くて is not an ending for a verb, it is the ~て form of an i-adjective. In your case the i-adjective formed by the verb 会う + the ending ~たい, where the ending ~たい is translated as "to want to". The ~て form of a verb, adjective or noun is used as a connective, which can sometimes be translated simply as "and", but sometimes this "and" can be interpreted to give ...


11

「それが人生」, while everyone will understand it, does sound pretty "translated". You will probably hear it more often in fiction than in real life. Thing is 「人生」 is a bigger word for us than "life" is for you. When we talk about an "everyday" kind of life, we use 「[生活]{せいかつ}」 or 「[暮]{く}らし」, not 「人生」. 「人生」 sounds more long-term and philosophical, which is ...


11

The most common reply among us native speakers would be a simple 「ありがとうございます。」. 「はい」 would sound pretty strange. You could say 「はい、ありがとうございます。」, though.


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