32

No, やれ{HL}やれ{HL} is not an onomatopoeia but an interjection. It doesn't symbolize any sound or state, and cannot used like other onomatopoeiae: × やれやれという音を立てて × やれやれした様子で But as you said, it's true that this word has no fixed translation in English. For example, Haruki Murakami is known to use this expression repeatedly as one of his signature style, ...


30

ちょっと待ってて (chotto matte te) literally means "Keep waiting for a while (please)." That て (te) at the end does not mean "I'll be back shortly", at least grammatically. ちょっと (chotto) just means "for a while", "a little", etc. 待ってて (matte te) is constructed as follows: 待つ (matsu): simple intransitive verb, "to wait" 待って (matte): te-form of 待つ 待っている (matte iru): ...


25

I'd personally use... ~は日本語【にほんご】で何【なん】と言【い】いますか? For years, I used the... ~は日本語で何ですか? But I had a Japanese native tell me it was more natural to use it with the verb 言う (polite form is 言います). So, to break it down, you're literally asking "What is ~ called in Japanese?" or "What do you say for ~ in Japanese?" 言う = to say と = grammatically ...


21

I think the この通り means (or, comes from) something like 「この通り、謝ります(だから許してください)。」 "I'm apologizing like this / as you see (so please forgive me)" or 「この通り、お願いします(だから頼みを聞いてください)。」 "I am begging you like this / as you see (so please do me a favor)." This phrase is used when you apologize someone or ask a favor of someone, and you'd usually say it while ...


19

「[Noun] + 仕立{じた}て」 means: "made in the [Noun] style" 「ビアホール」 is an establishment where people gather for the main purpose of drinking draft beer in huge beer mugs. When I first saw your question, I was going to say that 「ビアホール」 was a 和製英語{わせいえいご} (= "an English word created by the Japanese"), but I have found this place in the U.S., so I am not so ...


15

In this case, it would be read as [一日]{いち・にち} which just means "(one) day" as opposed to [一日]{≪ついたち≫} which means first of the month. My gut says that in this case 一日 is acting like "your day" in particular, trying to evoke your subjective answer of how it was in particular for you. If she had just asked you 「どんな[日]{ひ}でしたか?」, it would sound to me like a ...


15

待って is indeed the te-form, but 待て is not. It is the potential form. Remember that the final う sound becomes an え sound for the potential form of godan verbs? I guess this verb is a little more confusing than usual because つ becomes て (there not being a tse sound). So the positive potential form of the verb is now 待てる. This conjugates like a normal ichidan ...


14

The most common phrase would be: 見てるだけです。(Literally: "I'm just looking.") I think you could also reply like this: 店員:何かお探しですか?(Are you looking for anything in particular?)    客:いえ、だいじょうぶです。(No, I'm okay.)


14

Japanese よい/いい/よろしい sometimes means "... is not necessary" or "fine without ..." コーヒーはいいです。 (Thank you but) I don't want coffee. いや、いいです。 No thanks. / I don't need it. (e.g., to a salesperson) その話はもういい。 That's enough! 言い訳はよろしい。 Don't make excuses. Therefore, "ポイントカードはよろしいですか?" means something like "You don't want to use a point card, right?" ...


13

もしもし is like "Hello" and it's used in two kinds of situations: As the very first word of the call ("Hello, this is Tanaka speaking.") As the word to check if the other person can hear you, when the line is noisy or unstable ("Hello? Hello? Can you hear me?") In video calls, you can still safely use もしもし in the second situation. In the first sense, and in a ...


13

If you are looking for a slang term used in business that actually feels like "ASAP", we have: 「なる早{はや}」 which is short for 「なるべく早く」. You can say: 「なる早でお願{ねが}いします。」 or just 「なる早で!」


12

"Teach" in this case is simply "tell" -- i.e., "inform someone of something they did not know previously". As to why folks in Japan use 教える instead of 伝える or some other verb, that may have to be chalked up to cultural, historical, and linguistic differences. ADDENDUM: By way of example of "cultural, historical, and linguistic differences", it bears noting ...


12

You can expect to hear 「なきにしもあらず」 from any junior high schooler and sometimes even from 5th and 6th graders, seriously. It means exactly what you stated above -- "That is totally possible." Common set phrases sometimes come in a literary and/or older form like this one. Using those once in a while when necessary is never the same thing as trying to sound ...


12

I'm afraid to say that いつしも is very rare, and you can use it naturally only in literary sentences. ~しも was a grammatical element in archaic Japanese (it was a kind of intensifier similar to nothing but, even, necessarily, etc), but in modern Japanese it's not possible to combine an arbitrary word with it. You will find しも only in the following fixed ...


12

Yes, it can. It is in fact a fairly common way of expressing anger, frustration, disappointment, etc. Female speakers would probably use it slightly more often than male speakers. You will hear just 「もう!」、「もお!」、「もーお!」, etc. all by themselves, or with a word or phrase attached to one of those as in 「もういや!」、「もういい!」、「もう知{し}らない!」、「もうイチローさんったら!」, etc. Note: For ...


11

「それが人生」, while everyone will understand it, does sound pretty "translated". You will probably hear it more often in fiction than in real life. Thing is 「人生」 is a bigger word for us than "life" is for you. When we talk about an "everyday" kind of life, we use 「[生活]{せいかつ}」 or 「[暮]{く}らし」, not 「人生」. 「人生」 sounds more long-term and philosophical, which is ...


11

「あいつはあいつで~~」 means "He ~~ in his own way." As the word 「きちんと = "properly"」 may suggest, "Pronoun X + は + Same Pronoun X + で" expresses the speaker's opinion that the Person X is doing something at least on a satisfactory level if not on an extraordinary level. 「これはこれでおいしい。」 = "This dish tastes OK if not spectacular." ==> "It tastes good in its own ...


11

やれ、やれ is an interjection often uttered when ① you are relieved from a burden or mental pressure, or ② when you have some burden or a little problem ahead, for example: ①やれやれ、[一仕事]{ひとしごと}終わった - Oh boy, I’ve finished this job. やれやれ、やっと[飯]{めし}が[炊]{た}けた - Here we go! Rice is done. やれやれ、借金も終わって[肩]{かた}の[荷]{に}が[下]{お}りた - Thank God. I settled the loans. I'm now ...


11

If the scenario were saying "I don't want anything" in response to someone offering you something (food, drink, etc.), you could also use (私は)[結構]{けっ・こう}です。 → I'm fine/all right.


11

First, permit me to talk about the (imperative) verb form: 「黙{だま}って買{か}え!」 would pretty much mean the same thing as: "Just buy it! No questions asked." The noun form 「黙って買い」 refers to such a (great) product or service -- "an absolute must-buy". These expressions are often, if not exclusively, used in gambling and investment. (For the noun form, 「買い」...


11

Culturally, Japanese people are not as publicly direct about their deepest feelings. In English speaking cultures, we use the phrase "I love you" a LOT. It can be for an intimate relationship, or it can be used for a best friend with no romantic undertones. You won't hear the Japanese people say 愛している the same way Americans tend to use the English ...


11

It's probably Kansai dialect (or some western dialect). せないかん means しないといけない "have to do" in standard Japanese (deriving from せねばいかぬ to せにゃいかん to せないかん, perhaps?) Here in Kansai (esp. Kyoto and Osaka as far as I know) we also say せなあかん、しなあかん、しないかん, or せんとあかん、せんといかん to mean that. せな・しな・せんと means しないと・しなければ あかん・いかん means いけない


10

The most common reply among us native speakers would be a simple 「ありがとうございます。」. 「はい」 would sound pretty strange. You could say 「はい、ありがとうございます。」, though.


10

Most naturally and commonly, that would be: 「あっ、あと、氷も入れていただけませんか?」 We also use 「それと」 as well. Despite what you stated, 「それから」 is not a bad choice at all. Native speakers use that, too. You can say 「あとひとつ」, 「(それと/それから)もうひとつ」, etc. as well.


10

The general pattern is: 「something」は日本語で何ですか。 To break things down a bit: 「something」は = the phrase 日本語で = "in Japanese" 何ですか = "is what?" In this context, the で particle is used to mean "in this language", like so: 英語で「犬」は何ですか。 What is "dog" in English? Here's an example I remember seeing on japanese-online.com many years ago: Jason: Kore wa ...


10

As pointed out in the comments by @chocolate, 髪をセットする is a good way to say "to do one's hair". It can involve blow-drying, applying hair wax etc. 髪型をセットする means "to fix one's hairstyle", which sounds reasonable if you always wear the same (elaborate) hairstyle. If you are among friends you can also say 寝癖を直す as @永劫回帰 suggests, meaning to get rid of the ...


10

In this context 普通に means "just ~", "plainly ~", "simply ~", "~ in its plain sense" or "not in a tricky way but in a straightforward manner". This usage is relatively new and many people see it as slangy, if not incorrect. 結構 is different because 普通に嬉しい is about the type/quality of joy whereas 結構嬉しい is about ...


10

お気をつけください is a politer/more respectful way of saying 気をつけてください. It's the honorific 「お + noun form/連用形 + ください」 form. Examples: 「待ってください。」 "Please wait" (noun form/連用形 of 待つ is 待ち) → 「お+待ち+ください。」 「話してください。」 "Please speak" (noun form/連用形 of 話す is 話し) → 「お+話し+ください。」 「注意してください。」 "Please be careful" (for kango you generally use ご) → 「ご+注意+ください。」 Likewise: ...


9

You wouldn't use "どうか" standing by itself. Added to a request (like てください), I think it adds a nuance of a strong request/entirety/petition. どうか許{ゆる}してください - please forgive me どうか、息子{むすこ}を - please (help/save/look after) my son (sentence with verb dropped) By comparison, どうぞ can be used in an invitation/offering sort of sense (please have a seat/please ...


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