Hot answers tagged

65

Thanks to @Chocolate, I was able to learn what this word means, which is roughly that something was funny. Here are a couple sources: http://wikiwiki.jp/himoteplus/?%C1%F0%C0%B8%A4%A8%A4%BF http://www.logsoku.com/r/livejupiter/1340676537/ Why does it mean something was funny? Well, as discussed in this question, strings of w (such as wwwwww) express ...


51

While sawa's answer does cover the basic construction rules, it's definitely worth it to go over the different use cases of わけ. Grab a comfy chair and your favorite beverage, because this is a long one. The best and most complete analysis I've found of this use of わけ is in this 2001 paper by Atsuko Yokota: 文末【ぶんまつ】表現【ひょうげん】「わけだ」の用法【ようほう】 : 「はずだ」「ことになる」との比較【...


35

「アリ」 here means "acceptable", "no problem", "possible", etc. It is a vastly common colloquial usage, but I would not call it slangy. 「そんなのアリかよ?」 therefore means: "Is that (even) acceptable?" Needless to say, the word comes from 「有{あ}り」 and it is pronounced differently from 「アリ」 ("an ant"). 「アリ」 in question is 「アリ{HL}」. 「アリ」 ("an ant") is 「アリ{LH}」. ...


32

Seeing as Japanese doesn't really have anything analogous to English 'curse' words, you won't find anything that really feels the same. That particular phrase has a sort of punchiness to it that nothing in Japanese really renders well. It's in some ways more of a cultural thing than a linguistic one - expressing that particular emotion looks different when ...


19

っつ (sometimes つう) is a slang version of という (or an alternate version like といった, depending on the context). It's extremely informal. 冗談【じょうだん】だっつの。 (=冗談だ【じょうだん】といったの。) I said I was joking. [Idiomatically: Chill out, I was just kidding.] 彼【かれ】はやめたいっつってんだから、やめさせてやりゃいいじゃん。 (=彼【かれ】はやめたいといっているんだから、やめさせてやればいいじゃない。) He's saying he wants to quit, so why not ...


16

The difference between these two hinges on whether or not the action has been completed at the time the statement was made: 説明書を読んでも分かりにくい This could be taken in one of two ways: Even if you (I) read the instructions, it will [still] be hard to understand. Even after reading the instructions, it is [still] hard to understand. So with the ~ても form in this ...


15

We can find several patterns in these derivations: Long words are often clipped: ハーモニー   → ハーモ スターバックス → スターバ サボタージュ  → サボ Long vowels (with ー) and geminate consonants (with ッ) are shortened: グーグル    → ググル コピー     → コピ ハーモ     → ハモ スターバ    → スタバ パニック    → パニク If final ル is already present, it is reanalyzed as る: ググル     → ググる トラブル   ...


15

First, a brief explanation of the word 「テンション」 for those who are not familiar with it. It does not mean "tension" or "tense". Rather, it refers to "(a level of) excitement or hyperness seen in a person". 「テンション」 is such a frequently-used word that I had to define it first. I know from my personal experience that quite a few J-learners would think that ...


15

As NicoNicoPedia explains: 飯テロとは、善良な市民に対し無差別に食欲を沸き立たせる、残忍で卑劣極まりない行為である。 これらの行為を絶対に許してはならない。これらの行為に決して屈してはならない。 Meshi-tero is a most brutal and cowardly act which indiscriminately makes virtuous citizens feel hunger. We must absolutely not allow or give in to these acts. Or as Hatena Keyword says: 食欲をそそる料理や食べ物の画像(唐揚げ、ラーメンなど)をweb上にアップし、...


15

Here's a good article, although in Japanese: Japanese Questioning How To Say F*** Yeah! "F*** yeah!" は "F*** you!" とは全く違い、(absolutely different) ただ単【たん】に感嘆や同意を表す【あらわす】ために使われます。 "Oh, yeah!" (「ああ、その調子だ!良いぞ!」みたいな感じ【かんじ】)をさらに強めたもので、 場合【ばあい】によって「最高【さいこう】!」「良いぞ!」「その通り【とおり】!」という意味【いみ】になるでしょう。 So you would say, "saikou!" (This is the best!), "ii zo!" (So good!),...


15

Apologies if this should be a comment (don't think I can include photos in comments so putting as an answer), but "Saikou" would seem to fit, if this sign I photographed at a cat cafe in Harajuku is anything to go by (in katakana, interestingly):


14

「[働]{はたら}きたくにゃい」 is just a cute way of saying 「働きたくない」. It makes you sound like a kitten speaking.


14

The ん negative ending is a contraction of sorts of classical negative ending ぬ, precursor to modern ない. It's still pretty common. As illustration of this, the Microsoft IME gives 食べん as a valid conversion option after typing in taben, or 飲まん for noman. Note that する with the negative ん is not しん, but instead せん, as again the negative ん is from classical ぬ, ...


13

In colloquial speech, 「あるある」 is basically a way to respond to questions like "Have you ever noticed how the more busy Jack gets, the more he sweats". あるある means something like "Yeah, I recognize that situation" or "Yeah, I've been thinking about that too" or "Yeah, I have noticed that". One meaning of ネタ is 'humorous material' or 'joke material'. There's a ...


13

That is why I don't like Jisho. It does not explain things; It just throws definitions at you. "Amazing", or rather 「すごい」, is a new and slangy meaning of 「えぐい」. It is used quite heavily among the younger generations nowadays. It is used far more often than you seem to think, too. Even I, who is not so young, used the word for that meaning to describe ...


12

It means kuuki yomenai. A friend explained this concept as follows: In Japanese culture, the social protocol calls for utmost attention to the right "atmosphere." Certain actions can only be considered appropriate when the "atmosphere" of the time and place allowed for them to be carried out. In Japanese lingo, it is "reading the air" (空気を読む)...


12

Great research! Well, literal (笑) someday changed into 'w' especially in 2ch and such, and some people don't like ones who uses too many of them, like, ちょっwwwwwwwwwww, (this must be like "hey, wait a minulollollollollol") and they started saying 草生えすぎ, or using the AA you put above, frowned (・ω・) mowing the lawn. So now they also use 草生えた just instead of ...


12

わかんだ is not used in modern standard Japanese. If this ん were explanatory-の/ん, it requires a dictionary form of before it. わかるだ/わかんだ exists in some Eastern/Nothern dialects, but it sounds fairly provincial. In fact, this はっきりわかんだね is one of so-called 淫夢語, an Internet meme based on a certain gay porn video series. Semantically it just means something like "...


11

That's called 語呂合わせ and you could find full article at Wikipedia. Quoted from Wikepedia 1 : いち、い、ひとつ、ひと 2 : に、ふたつ、ふた、ふ、つ(英語から)、じ 3 : さん、さ、みっつ、みつ、み 4 : よん、よ、よっつ、し、ふぉ(英語から)、ほ 5 : ご、こ、い、いつつ、いつ 6 : ろく、ろ、むっつ、むつ、む 7 : しち、ななつ、なな、な 8 : はち、は、ぱあ、やっつ、やつ、や、やあ 9 : きゅう、きゅ、く、ここのつ、ここの、こ 0 : れい、れ、ぜろ、ない、わ(字形から)、まる(字形から)、おー(...


11

No. It does not have any feminine connotations.


11

No, there isn't. You will have to think of an alternative. For example: 仕事の話をする AさんとBさんはいつも仕事の話ばかりする A and B are always talking shop (talking about work). 専門の話をする この2人が専門の話をしている These two are talking shop.


11

アメテ! is baby speech for やめて! (Stop it!).


11

"To surf the internet" is literally ネットサーフィンする. And I think this is sort of informal. "To browse" is 見る. So ネットを見る is the answer. "Being on the internet" - either one above should be fine. We also say: インターネットに接続{せつぞく}する formal! This could also mean connecting to the internet. インターネットを閲覧{えつらん}する formal! This always means surfing/browsing the ...


10

The word is kire-ru. Like most 下一段, it naturally derives from the 下二段 verb kir-u. It is properly written 切れる. Consider the word 途切れる. You may think of it as "堪えていた気持ちが途切れて, and now I'm pissed". As for why it may be written as キレる: it is slang, and the katakana emphasizes this. The final -ru conjugates, so leaving it in hiragana is most natural. Also note ...


10

It's not prohibited to use in public, though it's not necessarily an objective expression and has negative nuance because it means people who gather at incidents with casual curiosity. In that point, 人だかり etc. will be safer. If you address a certain person as 野次馬, it'd sound offensive to him/her, but on the other hand, it's not particularly a problem to use ...


10

There are two "different" usages of the suffix 「ん」 in question. Type #1: When the final 「ん」 is included in the girl's "official" nickname. This means that the girl is already known to others by the nickname of 「~~~ん/ン」; therefore, practically everyone who knows her addressess her by that nickname. In this usage of 「ん」, there is little to no connotation ...


10

Another is: うそつけ (嘘{うそ}吐{つ}け)! - Liar! Comes from 嘘{うそ}をつく, to lie From comments: うそつき (嘘{うそ}吐{つ}き) - Liar; Someone who lies


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible