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37

「アリ」 here means "acceptable", "no problem", "possible", etc. It is a vastly common colloquial usage, but I would not call it slangy. 「そんなのアリかよ?」 therefore means: "Is that (even) acceptable?" Needless to say, the word comes from 「有{あ}り」 and it is pronounced differently from 「アリ」 ("an ant"). 「アリ」 in question is 「アリ{HL}」. 「アリ」 ("an ant") is 「アリ{LH}」. ...


34

Seeing as Japanese doesn't really have anything analogous to English 'curse' words, you won't find anything that really feels the same. That particular phrase has a sort of punchiness to it that nothing in Japanese really renders well. It's in some ways more of a cultural thing than a linguistic one - expressing that particular emotion looks different when ...


18

(It's easier to give examples using kana (それでわ, もうやめれ, 止めろください, ぬこ, イソターネット, メーノレ, ふいんき, ようつべ, ...), but you want examples with kanji? Okay...) {{pad}} For historical reasons Japanese kanij compounds can have dozens of 同音異字語 (homophones; words that share the same reading but have different kanji). And some argot and net-slang words are based on this fact. ...


16

The ん negative ending is a contraction of sorts of classical negative ending ぬ, precursor to modern ない. It's still pretty common. As illustration of this, the Microsoft IME gives 食べん as a valid conversion option after typing in taben, or 飲まん for noman. Note that する with the negative ん is not しん, but instead せん, as again the negative ん is from classical ぬ, ...


16

We can find several patterns in these derivations: Long words are often clipped: ハーモニー   → ハーモ スターバックス → スターバ サボタージュ  → サボ Long vowels (with ー) and geminate consonants (with ッ) are shortened: グーグル    → ググル コピー     → コピ ハーモ     → ハモ スターバ    → スタバ パニック    → パニク If final ル is already present, it is reanalyzed as る: ググル     → ググる トラブル   ...


16

Apologies if this should be a comment (don't think I can include photos in comments so putting as an answer), but "Saikou" would seem to fit, if this sign I photographed at a cat cafe in Harajuku is anything to go by (in katakana, interestingly):


15

First, a brief explanation of the word 「テンション」 for those who are not familiar with it. It does not mean "tension" or "tense". Rather, it refers to "(a level of) excitement or hyperness seen in a person". 「テンション」 is such a frequently-used word that I had to define it first. I know from my personal experience that quite a few J-learners would think that ...


15

As NicoNicoPedia explains: 飯テロとは、善良な市民に対し無差別に食欲を沸き立たせる、残忍で卑劣極まりない行為である。 これらの行為を絶対に許してはならない。これらの行為に決して屈してはならない。 Meshi-tero is a most brutal and cowardly act which indiscriminately makes virtuous citizens feel hunger. We must absolutely not allow or give in to these acts. Or as Hatena Keyword says: 食欲をそそる料理や食べ物の画像(唐揚げ、ラーメンなど)をweb上にアップし、...


15

Here's a good article, although in Japanese: Japanese Questioning How To Say F*** Yeah! "F*** yeah!" は "F*** you!" とは全く違い、(absolutely different) ただ単【たん】に感嘆や同意を表す【あらわす】ために使われます。 "Oh, yeah!" (「ああ、その調子だ!良いぞ!」みたいな感じ【かんじ】)をさらに強めたもので、 場合【ばあい】によって「最高【さいこう】!」「良いぞ!」「その通り【とおり】!」という意味【いみ】になるでしょう。 So you would say, "saikou!" (This is the best!), "ii zo!" (So good!),...


13

「やっちまえ」 is the tough guy's colloquial way of saying 「やってしまえ」 and it can mean so many different things because the verb 「やる」 has quite a few meanings. It can mean "Beat him up!", "Get him/her/them!", "Kill'em!", etc. It could even mean something I am not allowed to say on here. Another possibility is when やる means "to give something to someone". In that ...


13

「[働]{はたら}きたくにゃい」 is just a cute way of saying 「働きたくない」. It makes you sound like a kitten speaking.


13

わかんだ is not used in modern standard Japanese. If this ん were explanatory-の/ん, it requires a dictionary form of before it. わかるだ/わかんだ exists in some Eastern/Nothern dialects, but it sounds fairly provincial. In fact, this はっきりわかんだね is one of so-called 淫夢語, an Internet meme based on a certain gay porn video series. Semantically it just means something like "...


12

Great research! Well, literal (笑) someday changed into 'w' especially in 2ch and such, and some people don't like ones who uses too many of them, like, ちょっwwwwwwwwwww, (this must be like "hey, wait a minulollollollollol") and they started saying 草生えすぎ, or using the AA you put above, frowned (・ω・) mowing the lawn. So now they also use 草生えた just instead of ...


12

"To surf the internet" is literally ネットサーフィンする. And I think this is sort of informal. "To browse" is 見る. So ネットを見る is the answer. "Being on the internet" - either one above should be fine. We also say: インターネットに接続{せつぞく}する formal! This could also mean connecting to the internet. インターネットを閲覧{えつらん}する formal! This always means surfing/browsing the ...


12

That is why I don't like Jisho. It does not explain things; It just throws definitions at you. "Amazing", or rather 「すごい」, is a new and slangy meaning of 「えぐい」. It is used quite heavily among the younger generations nowadays. It is used far more often than you seem to think, too. Even I, who is not so young, used the word for that meaning to describe ...


12

「チーズ」 If it sounded like 「チーズ」 and it was said in a scene where one would say "Hello!", it would almost have to be: 「ちっす」、「ちーっす」, etc. It is an informal and slangy "Hi!" that comes from 「こんにちはっす」、「こんちゃっす」, etc. Naturally, this has nothing to do with cheese. 「をっと」 If this was uttered where you would expect to hear "Whoops!", then it would be: ・「おっと」 ...


12

バカが: "You fool!" が: not a subject marker but a vocative-like particle; see this ガード: [noun] "guard" (in this context, refers to psychological defense or skepticism against the seducer) がばがば: [onomatopoeic na-adj] describes how something is wide open, very loose or leaky に: destination/target marker ("to") なっから: colloquialism for なるから (forget the little-...


11

アメテ! is baby speech for やめて! (Stop it!).


11

This is usually not intended to be read aloud, but the most prevailing "reading" is not わらう but わら. For example, ww is わらわら. 笑うを意味する「www」をなんて読んでる? 「wは読まずに前の文を笑いながら」「わらわらわら」 You can mainly hear this pronunciation on live streaming sites such as ニコニコ生放送 where hosts often configure screen readers to read visitors' comments aloud. I have read somewhere that /...


11

We actually have so many, but the ones that are nationally known would include (going roughly from north to south): ・道産子{どさんこ} - Hokkaido ・水戸{みと}っぽ - City of Mito, Ibaraki Prefecture ・江戸{えど}っ子{こ} - Tokyo ・浜{はま}っ子 - Yokohama ・浪速{なにわ}っ子 - Osaka ・土佐{とさ}っ子 - Kouchi Prefecture ・博多{はかた}っ子 - Fukuoka ・薩摩隼人{さつまはやと} - Kagoshima (male only) ・おごじょ or 薩摩{さつま}...


10

It's not prohibited to use in public, though it's not necessarily an objective expression and has negative nuance because it means people who gather at incidents with casual curiosity. In that point, 人だかり etc. will be safer. If you address a certain person as 野次馬, it'd sound offensive to him/her, but on the other hand, it's not particularly a problem to use ...


10

There are two "different" usages of the suffix 「ん」 in question. Type #1: When the final 「ん」 is included in the girl's "official" nickname. This means that the girl is already known to others by the nickname of 「~~~ん/ン」; therefore, practically everyone who knows her addressess her by that nickname. In this usage of 「ん」, there is little to no connotation ...


10

嘘だよ is likely to mean "I am joking." One way to say "you are lying" is to use an interrogative form: 嘘だろ!? / 冗談だろ!? Isn't that a joke? マジかよ!? Really!? Examples above are very casual. Of course we can make them formal by using 敬語: 嘘ですよね? / 冗談ですよね? 本当ですか? (note that マジ is a casual saying of 本当). If we use a normal sentence, it might ...


10

This ねー is ない as you've correctly guessed. かな is usually "I wonder ~", but (ない)かな often expresses one's wish. 全員死なねーかな means "I wish they all die." かな 3 (「ないかな」の形で)願望の意を表す。「だれか代わりに行ってくれないかな」「早く夜が明けないかな」 This translates to a positive English sentence because ~ないかな is essentially a rhetorical question like "Why not ~?". You can choose whichever fits ...


10

Official as opposed to fanfiction/dojin is simply 公式. But do you want to refer to the canonical story line as opposed to that of a spin-off based on an alternative/what-if story? Like "main" Attack on Titan as opposed to Attack on Titan: Junior High, or "main" Dragon Ball as opposed to That Time I Got Reincarnated as Yamcha? In this case, both are 公式, so to ...


9

Another is: うそつけ (嘘{うそ}吐{つ}け)! - Liar! Comes from 嘘{うそ}をつく, to lie From comments: うそつき (嘘{うそ}吐{つ}き) - Liar; Someone who lies


9

An interesting slang communication system that's been around since 2009 is Pseudo-Chinese ([偽中国語]{にせちゅうごくご}), which is basically Japanese sentences stripped of all kana (although critical kana content words may be replaced with archaic kanji spellings). The kanji is in Japanese grammatical order but the text superficially appears like Chinese. For example, ...


9

It has quite a lot of uses outside of "often" and "well". In the form of 「よく食べる」 ~ "(They) eat a lot", it would translate to "much", "to a considerable degree" etc. This may sometimes be easy to confuse with the "often" and "frequently" definitions. It can also be used (often in the form of「よくぞ」) when someone says/does something that the speaker finds ...


9

ぎゃんかわ is slang for “really cute”. ぎゃんかわ → とても可愛{かわ}いい


9

Here 「ナマ」is short for「生意気{なまいき}」, meaning something to the effect of "impudent", "cocky". When you use「生意気{なまいき}」to describe the way someone talks or the stuff they say, you are saying they talk or behave in a very cocky or conceited way. 「くれる」, as you may know, is a marker that tells us the speaker is on the receiving end of an action. ...


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