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58

「読むには読んだ」 means 'skimmed' a book. You quickly ran through the book, but not intensively. "VるにはVた" means "If I were forced to answer if I did it or not, I did it (but not intensively / seriously)." For example: 英語を習うには習った、でも上手く喋れない。 I learned English, but I cannot speak it well. 聞くには聞いた、でも覚えていない。 I heard it, but I cannot recall it. 言うには言った、...


19

「って」 is the only correct answer here. When someone asks the question 「ねえ, 田中さん(   )どんなひと?」, the asker should basically have no knowledge of Tanaka, correct? That is where the topic-introducing 「って」 comes into place --- "this Tanaka guy", "this guy called --- what was his name, Tanaka?", etc. Using 「が」 is very unnatural (I would call it ...


11

I feel like that there is actually a subtle difference but I also think that I might not ever have thought about it had I not seen this question. In that sense, I appreciate the question. Are we native speakers required to be aware of the difference? No, I do not think so unless one wants to write professionally. I think that "[N1]を[N2]とした[N3]" ...


11

「Verb/Adjective + には + Same Verb/Adjective」 is a common (informal) way to emphasize the verb/adjective. 「[薦]{すす}められた[本]{ほん}を[読]{よ}むには読んだが、よく[理解]{りかい}できなかった。」 = "I did read the book that (someone recommended), but I was unable to understand it well." An example using an adjective: 「このピザはうまいにはうまいが、[激]{げき}ウマではない。」 "This pizza is indeed good, ...


11

「寝{ね}そう」 = "It looks like someone is about to go asleep" The person is still awake, officially. 「寝たよう」 = "It seems one has just gone asleep/gone to bed." As far as you can tell, the person is already asleep. Thus, the two phrases describe very different situations. 「一郎{いちろう}、まだ起{お}きているかな。」 "Would Ichiro be still up?" 「部屋{へや}...


10

「~~とあれば」= "if it is for ~~". Think of it as an emphatic form of 「なら」. 「よし[子]{こ}のためとあれば、[死]{し}んでもかまわない。」 = "I would not mind dying it it were for Yoshiko." You can insert 「もし」 at the beginning of the sentence if you want to. Occasionally, you will encounter the literary form 「~~とあらば」. The form "--aba", instead of "--eba" is heavily used in set phrases ...


10

わたしの父は中国語も英語も話せます。 My father can speak both Chinese and English. ~も~も is how you say "both ... and ..." in Japanese. It works with all particles, as も does by itself, i.e. usually replaces は, が, を and follows へ, に, etc. It also works with more than two も's, e.g. わたしの父は中国語も英語もドイツ語も話せます。 My father can speak (all of) Chinese, English and German. The ...


10

Rather than just solving your exercise (which is not the point of this website anyway) I'll try to give you general suggestions about how to approach this kind of problem. 1. Understand the context. What is the sentence talking about? It's an obvious question but it's important. Exam tip: If you have no clue or it's too difficult, maybe with some kanji/...


9

This is an example of how 〜上{じょう} can be suffixed to various kinds of media, similar to how we say “on television” or “on the internet” in English. Note that 〜上 can also be used for books/magazines, even though it would be “in a book/magazine” in English. Examples: テレビ上に映し出される映像 ラジオ上での対談 雑誌上のインタビュー パソコン上に保存してあるファイル パンフレット上に書いてあります etc. Interestingly, the ...


9

「これは」 is an expression which indicates surprise, or something that's giving the speaker pause, along the lines of "Wait, this one...". Anything coming before a 「という」 should be taken as literal exclamation; so rather than 「はという」, the sentence really is: なかなか「これは」というものが見つからない。 Which means "I can't really find anything that makes me go 'This is it.'", or ".....


9

~ならではの + noun is a set phrase meaning "(noun) only seen in ~", "(noun) unique to ~", "(noun) that can be done only by ~", etc. For example, you can say 渡辺先生ならではの手術, which means "surgery that can only be performed by Dr. Watanabe." (BTW, ならでは is read ならでわ) Now, this sentence is a cleft sentence where the person name is focused. When you say "この難しい手術ができるのは", ...


9

「~~そうもない」 and 「~~ようがない」 are vastly different from each other in meaning and usage, and there is no interchangeability between the two. 「Verb in [連用形]{れんようけい} + そうもない」 = "to not look like (action described by the verb) is happening (any time soon)" Describes "no-indication" situations. whereas 「Verb in 連用形 + ようがない」 = "There is no ...


9

1) 「またしても、[政治家]{せいじか}の[金]{かね}に[関]{かん}する[問題]{もんだい}が[明]{あき}らかになった。」 2) 「[強]{つよ}すぎる[冷暖房]{れいだんぼう}は[体]{からだ}に[良]{よ}くないし、またしても、[環境]{かんきょう}にも[悪]{わる}い。」 「またしても」 is an emphatic way of saying 「また」("again"). To use it correctly, you must have a situation where the same or a similar event has occured once again. In addition, 「またしても」 is usually, if not always, ...


9

This is an example of a [自他]{じ・た} pair. These pairs are an important concept to learn in Japanese because there are a ton of them! [Here]{LLLL} [are]{LLL} [several]{LLLLLLL} [resources]{LLLLLLLLL} with lots of examples and good explanations. 折る is a [他動詞]{た・どう・し} which is a transitive verb. This means an external agent/influence performs the action in ...


8

It seems you're not interpreting the sentence quite correctly. It should be "As a child I had no way of knowing how my mother felt at that time." [当時]{とうじ}[母]{はは}がどんな[気持]{きも}ちだったのか Would be "how my mother felt at the time." [子]{こ}どもの[私]{わたし}には[知]{し}るべくもないことだった。 I think this is where you might be getting thrown off. 子供の私には is what you need to focus ...


8

According to the definition of には 3 (多く「…には…が」の形で、動詞や形容詞を繰り返して)一応その動作や状態は認めるが、それに関連して起こる動作や状態については関知したり容認したりしない意を表す。「推薦状は、書くには書くが、あまり期待しないでくれ」「涼しいには涼しいが、ちょっと冷えすぎる」 It's saying that you recognize that a particular state or action but didn't acknowledge/accept the significance of what happened due to that state/action. So in this case: "Although I read ...


8

「Phrase/Mini-Sentence + こと + で + ゆうめい + だ/です, etc.」 means: "to be famous for the fact that (phrase/mini-sentence)" This is why 「~~いろいろな花がさくことでゆうめいです」 is grammatical and natural-sounding. It is, however, ungrammatical to say: 「Phrase/Mini-Sentence + ところ + で + ゆうめい + だ/です, etc.」 just as it is ungrammatical in English to say "to be famous for ...


8

Sometimes だけあって and だけに are interchangeable sometimes they aren't. In the case they are interchangeable is when the result is what is to be expected. For example, 彼が自慢するだけあって、彼女は美しい and 彼が自慢するだけに、彼女は美しい are natural. In the case they are not interchangeable is when the result is whether to be expected or not. だけあって is used for the result that is expected, ...


8

To me, an average Japanese speaker, 「日程{にってい}」 and 「プログラム」 are two words with two separate meanings even though I must admit that they can overlap in meaning to a small extent. They are, however, definitely not "synonyms" of each other. 「日程」 refers to an over-all (or "rough") time schedule of what takes place on what day at what time. It is often used to ...


8

your confusion stems from the fact that you are mis-translating でない as "can't come off". However this is actually a portion of a standard sentence fragment: てからでないと which is a phrase meaning "something can't happen until something else happens first" (here is a link that might help: https://japanesetest4you.com/flashcard/learn-jlpt-n2-grammar-%E3%81%A6%...


7

There is a meaning of 「それまで」 that you appear to be unfamiliar with, judging from your paraphrase. 「それまで」, in this context, means "(that is) the end of the story" and for this meaning, it is very often paired with hypothetical forms such as 「~~と言われたら/言われれば」,「~~であれば/だったら」, 「~~なら」, etc. https://kotobank.jp/word/%E5%85%B6%E3%82%8C%E8%BF%84-315527#E5.A4.A7.E8....


7

"大声で" isn't an adverb, but rather a noun followed by the particle で, which indicates the means by which something is done. The difference is like the English "There was even a person who was singing in a loud voice while climbing the mountain" vs. "There was even a person who was singing loudly while climbing the mountain". "大声で" is better thought of as the ...


7

「よやく(  )が わかりません。」 A) かた  B) のかた   C) しかた   D) のしかた So, the finished sentence should clearly mean: "I do not know how to make a reservation/appointment." To say "how to + (verb) + (object)", we use: 「Object + の + Verb in 連用形{れんようけい} (continuative form) + 方{かた}」 Among the four choices given, only D) のしかた fits this form. 「し」 is the ...


7

The correct answer is indeed 「きかい」 but this is not the 「きかい」 you are thinking of. 「機会{きかい}」 = "a chance" or "an opportunity" 「機械{きかい}」 = "a machine" The correct answer, of course, is the former. "If you have a chance to come to my area, by all means, please drop by." 「お寄{よ}り」 is the honorific noun form of the verb ...


7

有名 is a na-adjective and thus is followed by だ・で・な・に (or by じゃ < では) あの人は有名だ lit. that person is famous あの人は有名な人だ lit. that person is a famous person あの人はきっと有名になる lit. that person is surely going to become famous You can think of ではありません or じゃありません as the negative of です (which in turn is the polite form of だ whose negative would be ではない or じゃない). Hence ...


7

The only corrrect (or natural-sounding) answer would be c) 一週間{いっしゅうかん}. To use 「~~にわたって」 the way native speakers would feel most appropriate, the ~~ part must physically be in the following structure: 「Cardinal Number + Counter Word of Time period + (間{かん})」 Among the three choices, only 「一週間」 fits that deccription. 「五月{ごがつ}」 does not fit because ...


6

The correct answer should be 1-4-2-3. You have probably seen the common structure "〜〜という + Noun" before. 「と」 is a quotative particle so you have a good choice in #4 with quotation marks to precede it. So, we have a 4-2 for a start. The only choice that starts with a noun is #3, making a 4-2-3 an sure bet already. The only thing you now need to think ...


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