24

First, 「おっしゃい」 is the imperative form of the verb 「[仰]{おっしゃ}る」, which is the honorific form of 「[言]{い}う」. 「うそおっしゃい。」 means the exact opposite of what it means literally. Its literal meaning is "Tell a lie!", but that is clearly not something a person would say under normal circumstances, is it?. Thus, 「うそおっしゃい。」 always means "Don't lie (to me)!" A ...


18

(すごく古い質問ですが、偶然見つけたので) Although the number is small, there are some "英製和語" (an English word of Japanese-origin that has gained a significantly different meaning from the original Japanese word): Tycoon: 大君【たいくん】 in Japanese is a dated word for shogun, not a businessperson. Hibachi: Japanese 火鉢【ひばち】 is a small device primarily for heating a room. ...


17

Perhaps you're looking for 幸せ太り (pronounced as しあわせぶとり due to rendaku). This word is not particularly positive nor negative/derogatory. Gaining weight itself is not a desirable thing, but some people may see it as an enviable evidence of happiness.


16

なんて is an informal word that is used after some phrase and implies it is not important. Usage of なんて and なんか as emphasis Basically when you're kind of ignoring the importance of, or even slightly putting down, the topic of the sentence. 愛なんか要らない。(I don't need love!) など; なんか; なんて So when なんて is used like a standalone interjection, it means you said the ...


14

There is an exact Japanese equivalent to "Strike while the iron is hot," that is "鉄は熱いうちに打て." I don't know whether this proverb had existed before we knew English version, or is just a translation of "Strike while the iron is hot."


14

It appears to me that you have some misunderstandings about おいくつ... Is it natural to say 「おいくつですか」 to children who are around 10, or younger? No, it isn't. おいくつ is an honorific expression. It's a respectful and formal way of saying 何歳 or いくつ, and it's funny to say おいくつですか to a small child. Usually "いくつ?" or "何歳?" is enough to a small child. On the other ...


13

見たことがない means "Someone has never seen something ever." 見てない is 見ていない that is omitted い. ~している has two meanings. One is progressive form and the other is result state. So この映画は見てない means "I haven't watched this movie.", it's the later usage. 見てない in 今、映画を見てなくて、晩ご飯を食べてるよ is the former usage. For example, you can say 彼をまだ今日見てない、but ...


12

I'm not sure about hard and fast rules, but here's what I think: I think 心 is used when it is a natural flow, and does not involve too much deliberation and exertion of strong will. 意 involves intention and volition. 念 gives me the impression that an idea has been persisting in the person's mind and he is considering it. The short version: 心 - The ...


12

There's two reasons. Historically, 無し (modern ない) wasn't the negative form of ある but an adjective in its own right (meaning 'absent', and valid for any subject). The negative form of ある was あらず. Naturally, these words meant mostly the same thing, and over time あらず was fully replaced (in Kantou Japanese at least) with ない, which later went on (in Kantou ...


12

Although 相棒 is not bad a translation for "bro" IMO, we usually don't need those friendship "pronouns" because the greeting words in Japanese are diverse enough to distinguish those nuances alone, unlike English basically has only "hi" and "hey". For example (translation is not decisive, requesting improvements seriously): やあ: "Hi!", "Hi ya!" よう: "Hey bro!",...


12

次{つぎ}行{い}ってみよう is a famous phrase used by a Japanese comedian いかりや長{ちょう}介{すけ}. IIRC this phrase caught on in the late 1970's. He used this catchphrase frequently in his TV comedy show, at the end of many comedy bits. (picture taken from here) It literally means "Let's go to the next segment (scene, chapter, etc.)", which is not really funny by itself. ...


12

If the scenario were saying "I don't want anything" in response to someone offering you something (food, drink, etc.), you could also use (私は)[結構]{けっ・こう}です。 → I'm fine/all right.


11

Japanese-Japanese dictionaries give almost complehensive lists. “Aという” originally meant “someone says A”, but its original meaning has been lost in many cases, and it is used like a 助詞. “Aということだ。” means “I heard that A.” In this sentence meaning of “say” is remaining. In other cases “Aということ” is used as a noun clause. A shorter form “Aこと” is also used, but “...


11

They do appear to be shortenings, but perhaps not of any particular wording. 大辞林 says they're short for sentences like the following: こんにちは is short for sentences such as 今日は御機嫌いかがですか こんばんは is short for sentences such as 今晩はよい晩です In each case, 大辞林 marks the sentence in quotes with など, implying it doesn't necessarily come from those sentences specifically, ...


11

「それが人生」, while everyone will understand it, does sound pretty "translated". You will probably hear it more often in fiction than in real life. Thing is 「人生」 is a bigger word for us than "life" is for you. When we talk about an "everyday" kind of life, we use 「[生活]{せいかつ}」 or 「[暮]{く}らし」, not 「人生」. 「人生」 sounds more long-term and philosophical, which is ...


11

The most common reply among us native speakers would be a simple 「ありがとうございます。」. 「はい」 would sound pretty strange. You could say 「はい、ありがとうございます。」, though.


11

When you use "say" or "言う", the content of the speech is the most important. The existence of the physical sound/voice is not usually important, nor necessary. Dictionaries say so. 彼はブログで、そう言っていた。(≒彼のブログに、そう書いてあった。) On the other hand, when we use "声が出る" (intransitive) or "声を出す" (transitive), the existence of the physical sound is the most ...


11

引用文の終わりに、括弧に入れて (訳は筆者による) ←recommended または、(筆者訳) ← recommended (拙訳) (私訳) のように書くとよいと思います。


11

I think the も here is this: 1⃣ 係助詞 3-㋑動詞の連用形や動作性名詞に付き、打消しの語と呼応して、強い否定の意を表す。「思いもよらぬ話」「返事もしない」(デジタル大辞泉) So the も indicates emphasis, used with a negative phrase. I think this も is usually translated as "even": 訴訟を辞さない wouldn't hesitate to file a lawsuit; willing to bring a lawsuit 訴訟も辞さない wouldn't even hesitate to file a lawsuit; willing to bring even a ...


11

「でもだんだんやさしくなることは本当{ほんとう}です。」 Nice try, but it only sounds 80-85% natural. (It is 100% grammatical if it is the grammar that matters.) 「本当」: A more natural word choice would be 「事実{じじつ}」. Using 「本当」 there could make it sound a bit childish. 「なる」: The native speaker's phrase choice would be 「なってきている」 or 「なっている」. 「でもなるほど日本語がますますやさしくなってきています。」 Excellent ...


11

In this case, just saying お疲れ様でした would sound disrespectful, because she is the sensei during the lessons, after all. After you reach an advanced level, saying ありがとうございました first and adding お疲れ様でした would be nice: ○○先生、ありがとうございました。遅くまでお疲れ様でした。次回もよろしくお願いします。 But as a starter, let's never forget to say ありがとうございました.


10

To understand what this expression means, picture a father and a son. The father is a craftsman, who spends most of his time awake at work. He's not very eloquent, and while he cares about the son, he won't really say much. The son goes through the usual juvenile process, struggling with the meaning of his life, not ready to accept the simple life of his ...


10

The word you are looking for is すなわち and should be in every dictionary. It means "therefore"/"namely".


10

The short answer is "because Japanese speakers will it to be that way." The pedagogical answer is that 払う operates on お金, not the thing you're paying for. This is exactly the same as in English. You don't "pay drinks." You pay for drinks. Drinks are not the direct object in English or Japanese. The money is the direct object, so you follow it with を. If ...


10

This looks primarily like a 敬語{けいご} problem, more than a syntax or semantics problem. お使いいただく is 敬語, and 食べる does not match it at all. 食べる is neither 尊敬語 nor 謙譲語. This means that 「ご飯を食べる」 is not even polite when 私 is the one doing the eating. There are many ways to say (あなたが)食べる in 敬語: 召し上がられる お召し上がりになる (*1) お食べになる etc. (私が)食べる in 敬語: いただく ちょうだいする Your ...


10

やりたい放題 is a bit different from other ○○放題. It's an idiomatic phrase which primarily refers to someone's tyrant-like, irresponsible, self-indulgent behavior. Because it usually has a negative connotation, it's less likely to serve as a marketing phrase (except something like this). 母親が亡くなって以降、あの王女はやりたい放題だ。 やり放題 is less common and may refer to the same ...


10

It is 「[鉄]{てつ}は[熱]{あつ}いうちに[打]{う}て」 and every Japanese-speaker would be familiar with this saying. English to Japanese: http://www.wa.commufa.jp/~anknak/ (Click where it says 「英語ことわざのABC順分類」)


10

X に X を重ねる (lit. to pile up X (further) onto X) is an idiomatic phrase to mean "doing X extensively, or unthinkably many times over", usually X is a noun that means some kind of (hard) work. I also often hear: 研究に研究を重ねる 努力に努力を重ねる 改良に改良を重ねる etc.


10

The verb 言う is omitted after なんて. So you can translate it "saying (something) like that", or virtually as a subjunctive: "(as if) it be/were like that". That's why it comes to have "I'm kidding" sense. (Left: screen capture of 逆転裁判5, Right: the same cut on its English version, Dual Destinies.) A synonymous expression is なんちゃって (< なんて言っちゃって). This one ...


9

Good question. The phrase would drive me up the wall if I were a Japanese learner, too. 「[形]{かたち}」 here means "appearance". What that ultimately means is "outfit". 「[入]{はい}る」 here means "to start (learning something new)". I am sure small bilingual dictionaries could be useless with these two in this particular context. 「形から入る」 means "Someone (always)...


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