32

The thing to keep in mind is that this isn't a ritualized situation, such as the 只今{ただいま}/お帰{かえ}り, "I'm back" / "welcome back", call and response pattern. When you come and go from the office or home, there are set patterns. This restaurant situation isn't like that. Specific to your questions, there is no usual exchange between customer and cashier when ...


30

Here are the results from a small poll on Facebook. Six native Japanese replied. The results can be interpreted as: Don't say anything if you don't know them (6 people) If you know them you can ask if they're okay, if they've caught a cold or have allergies: "大丈夫?", "風邪引いたの?", "花粉症なの?", or something to that effect. (2 people) There's no such phrase ...


26

I'd describe it best as a greeting or set phrase used after (any sort of) work has been done. It can be used in a variety of situations: at the end of any shared activity (before leaving home from work, after volunteer work, after group activities like hiking), very much in the sense of "See you..." when greeting somebody who (supposedly) is working or has ...


25

乗り切る doesn't quite fit here because it's about enduring through a hardship. With 乗り切る, wave(s) of difficulties come and go while you persevere, where as in "get over it," you need to overcome it yourself. 乗り越える, 克服する and 打ち勝つ do have the sense of actively overcoming some obstacle, and may work if you use it together with the right noun. I'll come back to ...


24

Japanese here. I find it fine to say ありがとう for the first two, although どうも is more common. Not saying anything is perfectly acceptable. You can also nod, which is very common. When you leave the restaurant, it is common to say ごちそうさまで~す or ごちそうさまでした. If you are female, ごちそうさまでした would be more common. It is perfectly ok to leave without saying anything. ...


22

First, 「おっしゃい」 is the imperative form of the verb 「[仰]{おっしゃ}る」, which is the honorific form of 「[言]{い}う」. 「うそおっしゃい。」 means the exact opposite of what it means literally. Its literal meaning is "Tell a lie!", but that is clearly not something a person would say under normal circumstances, is it?. Thus, 「うそおっしゃい。」 always means "Don't lie (to me)!" A ...


20

There is a common phrase for that. ご愁傷さまです - go shuushou sama desu For example お母上が亡くなられご愁傷さまです  I'm very sorry about your mother's death Regarding sending something, there is a special custom in Japan called [香典]{こうでん} - giving money to remaining family members with the purpose of offering it to the departed soul. (Originally, this was used as an ...


18

Regarding formal use: It is a widely-held misconception (even among some young Japanese when they start working in a company) that you should use お疲れさま when leaving the office. Strictly speaking, this is incorrect. お疲れさま[です/でした] is something you say to people leaving, or when you and the other person are both leaving (e.g. when you meet a colleague at the ...


17

I had learnt the difference ages ago, but ha forgotten it since. I asked my friend Chie, and she said: しなければいけない -> when you think that there's no other choice しなければならない -> when you've been told to do it, or when it's rather a burden to you. I think (as often) that looking at words can help. In the いけない proposition, you say basically that "you can't go ...


16

Beside 勘定 (or 勘定書) mentioned by Louis, お会計【かいけい】 is also a very common way to refer to the bill: お会計をください お会計お願いします I believe 会計 has a more general nuance than 勘定 ("bill", rather than "check"), meaning it can be used in some instances where 勘定 would not fit. For restaurants, they are essentially interchangeable. The gesture described by Louis (...


16

Perhaps you're looking for 幸せ太り (pronounced as しあわせぶとり due to rendaku). This word is not particularly positive nor negative/derogatory. Gaining weight itself is not a desirable thing, but some people may see it as an enviable evidence of happiness.


15

はじめ hajime is "the beginning", so はじめの日 hajime no hi should be translated as "The day of the beginning" or "The day it begun" and はじめの一歩 hajime no ippo as "The step that started it". はじめて hajimete is "for the first time", so はじめての朝 hajimete no asa would be "(My) first morning" and はじめてのあく hajimete no aku would be "My first Aku" (apparently officially "My ...


14

In my understanding, Japanese normally does not interfere with other's personal stuff most of time. So, they don't use those after sneeze. But if influenza is hot during that time, they may ask "Are you ok?". And some people think that silent and unchanged facial expresssions are elegent on sneeze here, so there is some sneeze contest 「くしゃみ対決」 by ...


14

(すごく古い質問ですが、偶然見つけたので) Although the number is small, there seems to be some "英製和語" (an English word of Japanese-origin, that has a significantly different meaning from the original Japanese word): Tycoon (大君【たいくん】 in Japanese is a dated word for shogun, not a businessperson) Hibachi (Japanese 火鉢【ひばち】 is a heating device and not used for cooking) Satsuma (薩摩【...


13

ありがた迷惑 is not two separate words. It is one word, a compound noun. When you make a compound noun like this in Japanese, you only use the stem of the adjective. The stem of ありがたい is ありがた, so this gets added to 迷惑 and you end up with ありがた迷惑. Here are some similar examples of "adjective stem + noun" compound nouns, and the equivalent "adjective, noun" two-word ...


13

Interesting question. The 日本国語大辞典 says that だらしない appears to be an inversion of しだらない, quite possibly a self-conscious thing like せるき for きせる (the Edo-period book Ukiyoburo explicitly claims this). The roots of しだらない are murkier. しだら has negative connotations on its own, and may come from Buddhist jargon, the mimetic しどろ, or somewhere else. But if しだら is ...


13

気をつけて: "take care", "be careful" (is more generic than the other ones, for example it can be used in 足元に気をつけて "watch your step") お大事に: "get well soon" (often said to people recovering from illness etc, literally something like "treat (yourself) with value/respect/care") お元気で: "be well/healthy", "all the best", "take care of yourself"


13

There is an exact Japanese equivalent to "Strike while the iron is hot," that is "鉄は熱いうちに打て." I don't know whether this proverb had existed before we knew English version, or is just a translation of "Strike while the iron is hot."


12

The meaning is the same. If we compare できるだけ and できる限り, できる限り (literally “to the limit one can”) sounds stronger than できるだけ (literally “as much as one can”), so the nuance is slightly different, but not much. While onteria_’s answer and the answers on Goo to which it links have some points, I think that they are describing the difference between the two ...


12

Chakoshi to the rescue! (Chakoshi is a tool for searching both the Aozora and conversational Japanese corpora at Nagoya University.) A quick search for a "[noun]ん[noun]" pattern in the conversational corpus gives 262 results, most of which are what you are asking about. Broken down, there's actually not much variety in the nouns that follow ん: とき (99): ...


12

Although 相棒 is not bad a translation for "bro" IMO, we usually don't need those friendship "pronouns" because the greeting words in Japanese are diverse enough to distinguish those nuances alone, unlike English basically has only "hi" and "hey". For example (translation is not decisive, requesting improvements seriously): やあ: "Hi!", "Hi ya!" よう: "Hey bro!",...


12

なんて is an informal word that is used after some phrase and implies it is not important. Usage of なんて and なんか as emphasis Basically when you're kind of ignoring the importance of, or even slightly putting down, the topic of the sentence. 愛なんか要らない。(I don't need love!) など; なんか; なんて So when なんて is used like a standalone interjection, it means you said the ...


12

If the scenario were saying "I don't want anything" in response to someone offering you something (food, drink, etc.), you could also use (私は)[結構]{けっ・こう}です。 → I'm fine/all right.


11

Your question is "is there a scenario when finishing with [] would be considered out of place or context?". As you noted, 宜しくお願い is similar to "Cheers" or "Regards", but the main difference is that neither of the latter are calls to action, whereas the former has more of a feeling of asking something. Accordingly, among coworkers, it's fine to use when you'...


11

I've researched a bit and it seems that such expression doesn't really exist in Japanese. There is a kind of explanation for this: In the Western societies, there used to be a belief that sneezes could release one's soul, therefore putting it in danger because it could have been "captured" by lurking evil spirits; or it was believed that the mouth opened ...


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