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19

It's just a coincidence. According to this article, the word 「写真」 and its usage predates photography. The 「真」 part referred to 「人の姿」, so 写真 was used to mean 「姿を写したもの」, and was used for other things such as ink drawings, 浮世絵, and other illustrations of people. From the article: このフォトグラフィ以前の写真とは、(王様や身分の高い)人物の姿をそっくりに描くことを指している。日本でも天皇の写真のことをかつては「御真影」と言ったが、...


17

To start off, the kanji「象」is uncontroversially derived from a picture of an elephant, directly referring to the word「[象]{ぞう}」. 商甲前3・31.3合集10222西周金師湯父鼎集成2780秦簡為吏之道17睡虎地秦簡今楷  In Ancient China, people would frequently run into a problem: there weren't enough unique characters to express all the different spoken words! When running into this problem, people ...


16

No, it's not. Wikipedia says: 日本語の「写真」という言葉は、中国語の「真を写したもの」からである Japanese "写真" comes from the Chinese meaning "Copy/reproduction(写) of the reality/truth(真)" Source is 『日本語源広辞典』(Nihongo Genji(?) Jiten). P.S. The shutter sound is usually written as カシャ or パシャ.


15

check out this excerpt from 大辞林第三版 on ませ ませ( 助動 ) 〔丁寧の助動詞「ます」の命令形〕 ① 「いらっしゃる」「おっしゃる」「くださる」「なさる」「申す」「召す」などの動詞の連用形に付いて,相手に対して,その動作をするようにという要求を,丁寧の気持ちを含めて言い表す。 「くれぐれも御自愛くださいませ」 「十分お気をつけなさいませ」 ② 挨拶(あいさつ)の語句に用いて,語調を丁寧にする。 「お帰りなさいませ」 〔② は,元来,「よくお帰りなさいました」のような言い方の省略した形「お帰りなさい」を,命令の言い方と混同して,それに「ます」の命令形「ませ」を付けて,丁寧な気持ちを添えようとしたところからできたもの〕 → まし(助動) ・ ます(助動) We ...


10

奇数 is an ancient Chinese word, and it is unlikely to be a calque (translation) of the English word odd number. A 2nd century dictionary 説文解字 already has an entry: 奇:異也。一曰不耦。 奇: 1. strange. 2. not paired. 奇 "odd" and 偶 (耦) "even" are historically mainly technical terms in Chinese cleromancy 易占, but it has a long history of use. But beware that this 奇 ...


7

First of all, the meaning of 「とある」 with its fine nuances included would be "a tidbit of", "of sorts", etc. I specifically wanted to state that before anything because by blindly believing the common "bilingual dictionary" definitions of 「とある」, which are "some" and "certain", one could unconsciously seek an etymological explanation that would seem valid for ...


4

Let's look at these two in turn. 彼氏【かれし】 According to Shogakukan's 国語大辞典【こくごだいじてん】 (KDJ) entry here, 彼氏 initially meant just "that person", derived as 彼【かれ】 + honorific person suffix 氏【し】. Apparently the honorific was used a bit ironically, and the term was actually intended as a slight pejorative. If the entry is anything to go by, it appears in texts ...


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