39

Apart from the diacritic-derived characters, hiragana (and kana in general) should be seen as non-reduceable graphical units. They are not derived from simpler functional units. Their formation is based on the principle of graphical abbreviation from more complex characters, and in hiragana's case, the inspiration behind the shapes is cursive script. In a ...


17

The mighty dROOOze's answer covers the bases. I just wanted to counter with a similar question -- is b related to d related to p? :) Ultimately, the shapes come from unrelated glyphs (character shapes). The ancient origins of both the Latin alphabet letters and the Japanese kana characters were glyphs with meaning to them (hieroglyphs underlie Latin ...


9

Does this class of words have a name? I don't think so. Do words like "banana" and "indivisibility" have a special name in English? Are these words more poetic in a way? As wordplay, a poem that contains many such words may exist somewhere, but it's not popular at all. Are there other, longer, words like this that I missed? Japanese has only 5 ...


7

If you search for the page referenced on Wikipedia ("11 Origins of 11 Super Mario Characters' Names"), you'll find the answer: Anyway, in Japan, he’s named Kinopio, which is a mixture of the word for mushroom (“kinoko”) and the Japanese version of Pinocchio (“pinokio”). Those blend to be something along the lines of “A Real Mushroom Boy.” https://...


4

Both hiragana and katakana are derived from manyogana. Manyogana were the kanji characters used to write Japanese phonographically in early writing after the characters were imported from Chinese. The kanji 平 can also have the meaning of 'ordinary' (definition in Japanese). So it is a way of describing 'ordinary script' or, in other words, simplified ...


3

I checked two corpora: 青空文庫全文検索 (includes public domain literary works roughly in 1850-1950) BCCWJ (includes contemporary Japanese text in 1970-2005) According to the former, 滑り出す as an ordinary compound verb ("to start to slide/slip") has been commonly used regardless of the age. But as an idiomatic noun meaning "beginning", its first appearance was in ...


2

I think it's a general-use type of idiom, not specifically for formal or written use only. The meaning of the idiom is almost the literal meaning of the words. "As soon as I thought about it, ..." I'm guessing that the "no sooner than" translation is more along the lines of "no sooner than had she arrived, ..." rather than "arrive no sooner than 3pm."


2

Here are a few key things to note about this. Strokes: Let's keep it simple and call them 'components' for now, in that they are a collection of identical strokes. The two components you asked about are visually identical and most dictionaries list them as having 3 strokes, not 2 (e.g. such as Weblio).I'm not familiar with the app you mentioned so I can't ...


2

I think part of the confusion here is that radicals are not the same thing as components. This is compounded by the fact that many sources use the term "radical" incorrectly, including jisho.org, which refers to what it offers as a radical search, but what it does is actually more correctly a component search. component is a term for any common part of ...


1

だす with a native verb in the i-form (連用形) means to start doing something. 働【はたら】き出【だ】す = start working. 言【い】い出【だ】す = start talking I can see why 滑り出し could mean beginning (imagining myself at the top of a large waterslide) but I'm curious to know if there is any historical context behind this. It seems to me that すべりだす is just another construction ...


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