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11

Let's talk about something practical first. Something like 食べさせられたくなかったです, beautifully explained in this article, is probably the longest natural verb "form" that may appear in ordinary conversations. Also, you don't need to worry about extremely long verbs conjugations. They usually do not stack as many times as the number of colors in the ...


1

I think that 空 means "sky" here and that the sentence means: even if I look up the sky in the scent of the night


3

I may be jumping in a bit early, as your post in its current state is a bit confused. However, I think I understand enough of what you're trying to ask to attempt an answer. I'll restate your core question as I understand it. How does する conjugate into the negative form しない? As you note, する is an irregular verb. So things get a bit messy. Conjugation types:...


2

Short answer: you can't. たい form is only used with verbs. 嫌い, a な-adj, cannot be conjugated into たい. However, you can come up with phrases that are equivalent to what you're trying to express. 彼のことは嫌いになりたくない。 I don't want to come to dislike him. I also want to point out that 嫌う is indeed a verb, but I do not think it is ever used in 嫌いたくない. I could be ...


3

It's just a rare or unique onomatopoeia, not a kind of conjugation. You wouldn't see this outside of a few fairy tales or children's songs. I think worrying about this is like worrying about every single weird expression in Mother Goose. Still, although this may be a far-fetched analysis, this somewhat sounds like えっちらおっちら, and I vaguely feel the nuance of &...


6

You misunderstand, likely due to the challenges of translation and of explaining one language using the words and constructions of another. Verbs like 潰【つぶ】れる and 漬【つ】かる are not passive, but rather stative -- they describe the state of something. For 潰【つぶ】れる, the meaning is not passive "to be crushed by someone or something". Instead, it may be ...


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