New answers tagged

1

That will depend on your intentions. Without additional qualifications, your name would be read ホウ・コウシン in Japanese, as these are the only on-readings of the corresponding characters that are current in Japan. If that is okay with you, no additional effort is needed. (Note though that 彭 is not a frequent character in Japan, and you cannot be sure that an ...


0

If basing the assumption that identical kana means "pronounced the exact the same way", hauska tavata! For people of less monotone languages than Finnish, in addition to context, they apparently have the tone/intonation. Maybe the most classic example is hashi/hashi (the chopsticks vs bridge) which others than Finns I think understand even without ...


0

It is actually possible to write anything in Japanese using only Hiragana and Katakana which are the phonetic systems. Kanji are ideograms, so they do not represent specific sounds but ideas. In Latin languages, kanjis would be like the root meanings of the words. Lets see for example the following 2 words in English: God Theology If we decompose this ...


0

Maybe this is unrelated, but クリンコ is a person's name who had a connection to Bowie. Marcus Klinko is a fashion photographer who took pictures of David Bowie.


4

Ok, I found the answer. I'll post it here in case anybody ever else needs it. This is taken from the show Aggretsuko and it's actually a mispronunciation クリック (click)


4

When it comes to localization of proper nouns, especially titles, experts may do something aggressive for various reasons. It's a very creative task, and you have to be very good at both languages and cultures. Check this list of Pokémon and imagine how Japanese names are localized to English. You can see many patterns: Transliteration: ピカチュウ → Pikachu; ...


Top 50 recent answers are included