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2

In addition to the other answers, I have also seen cases where, when dialogue is spoken by young children, sometimes the lines they say will use additional furigana (or just writing words out in kana instead of kanji) to give the feeling of the words being spoken by a young person (i.e. the included furigana/kana is made appropriate to the age of the ...


3

I think the reasons are all various. According to the Association of Japanese Newspapers, 椅子 is “a word with complex kanji or an existing tradition of writing in hiragana,” that should prescriptively be supported by hiragana in writing. 猫, meanwhile, is a word that is known from childhood but its kanji is taught relatively late. 悪戯 is a very non-Jōyō usage, ...


3

As @Chocolate states in the related link, I believe it has more to do with the age/grade the kanji are taught in school, rather than the commonality of them. So even though 猫 might be seen pretty often by young kids, several sources indicate that it is not taught until junior high school (beyond 6th grade).


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It's not clear to me that furigana often appears in places where it isn't necessary. Possible explanations for the use in the case of your book are that the first character of isu used not to be in the Joyo kanji list until 2010, and there is also a rule that animal and plant names should be in katakana.


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