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1

It's exactly the same reason why マンガ is commonly written in katakana. For some words, katakana makes them look "soft", "casual", "catchy", "friendly"...or whatever. This is why アタマ is often used in product names and catchphrases, as shown below: As you can see, this has nothing to do with respect or humbleness. You ...


1

Purely speculative though, I think it's somewhat condescending description of children's head because the kanji :「頭」is normally used to describe an important person. 頭{かしら} is the head of the group of carpenters. 頭{とう}取{どり} is the CEO of bank. 船頭{せんどう} is the captain of the ship. So, the author wants to used「アタマ」for children's brain/mind/head in somewhat ...


0

I believe the most popular form is か っ こ い い, at least among the most popular search terms cited here. However, you can test other variations and update the graph in Google Trends. Thanks for listening. Google Trends https://trends.google.com.br/trends/explore?date=all&geo=JP&q=%E3%82%AB%E3%83%83%E3%82%B3%E3%81%84%E3%81%84,%E3%81%8B%E3%81%A3%E3%81%93%...


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This is a very interesting question. There are certain "classes" of words where I don't think native speakers would have this problem at all. I doubt anyone would read 父 as just 「と」, or 大 as just 「お」, unless it was being used cleverly in a number. However, I think when using okurigana for verbs one is more likely to be confused/unsure. Sometimes ...


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