New answers tagged

1

"me zoo" is the standard pronunciation. "z" is pronounced "z" (a voiced alveolar fricative) in the middle of words, and "dz" (a voiced alveolar affricate) at the beginning of words. So みず is pronounced "me zoo", but "ずっと" is pronounced "dzootto". I would guess maybe the speaker had some ...


0

I think "me zoo" of course with no doubt is the more proper pronunciation for that. You are hearing "me dzoo" maybe because of regional dialects that alter word phonetics. Within the English (U.S.) context, you may hear, for example, "I am about to~" which is the most favored melody to our ears but when you find yourself ...


1

One of the best ways is simply to listen to native speakers making these sounds and then mimic them. A very helpful technique is to record yourself making the sounds so that you can listen back and compare your attempts to the native speakers' versions. ら https://ja.forvo.com/word/%E3%82%89/#ja り https://ja.forvo.com/word/%E3%82%8A/#ja る https://ja.forvo....


0

If basing the assumption that identical kana means "pronounced the exact the same way", hauska tavata! For people of less monotone languages than Finnish, in addition to context, they apparently have the tone/intonation. Maybe the most classic example is hashi/hashi (the chopsticks vs bridge) which others than Finns I think understand even without ...


1

I consider the R- sound and the "tt" (or "dd") sounds from your example of "butter" to be completely different. I can't substitute the R- sound into "butter" - creating an abominable word in the process - and have it sound close enough to "butter" without confusing people at the supermarket. I find the best ...


16

Japanese, a language which has 3-level vowel height system, does not have the distinction of //e// and //ɛ//. Or speaking more correctly, Japanese え and お are (true) mid vowels, that their sweet spots fall just midway of theoretical [[e]] and [[ɛ]]. (We write them [[e̞]] and [[o̞]] in IPA if necessary.) (chart from Wikipedia) And as far as the Standard ...


-1

To answer this question, I checked the sounds of /ɛ/ and /e/ here. And then I compared it to the pronunciation of 絵 which is the closest word you have to the sound of え. For good measure, I checked the pronunciation of エネルギー. I conclude that it is closer to /ɛ/ than to /e/.


5

As long as typical え is concerned, English e as in bed is a bit too low-toungue'd for え, though it's still included in allophone. In this regard, spanish e is much closer, or the same.


3

Looks like 電報船 is a made-up term that is unique to this manga, but since 電報 is an on-on compound (i.e., a kango), people usually expect 船 to be read せん, too. As this answer explains, せん is an on-reading and thus will not be voiced into ぜん. On + せん: 連絡船【れんらくせん】, 貨物船【かもつせん】, 宇宙船【うちゅうせん】 Kun + ぶね: 屋形船【やかたぶね】, 箱船【はこぶね】, 乗合船【のりあいぶね】 That said, since this is a ...


0

This word does not appear in the standard dictionaries Kojien (広辞苑第六版), Daijisen (大辞泉), Daijiren (三省堂 スーパー大辞林), Shinmeikai (新明解国語辞典), nor in several online dictionaries I searched. It could be an extremely rare word, but it's also possible the word is a nonce which appears only in that source text. If it is a coined term, there wouldn't be an 'official' ...


0

I found answer for it after days of searching on the internet. Important note: The actual sound may vary depending on the accent of the speaker as you can find in the links that I posted in the questions. Some people pronounce [ɸ] as in ふ the following way: Try to make a voiceless sound as if you are blowing a balloon (the [ɸ] appears here). Add ɯ sound (...


4

It turns out that OP's question is that Japanese ふ sometimes sounds as if Vietnamese ph //f// and other times kh //x//. That observation is true. The status of [[ɸ]] sound in Japanese is somewhat shaky because it appears mostly as an allophone in the environment //h// + //u// (strictly speaking, however, influx of modern loanwords has developed independent ...


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