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3

According to いっぽん、にほん、さんぼん問題の解決, I adopt the author's theory and I translated it. いっぽん 原形「ぽん」が前接する「いち」の語末母音脱落、促音便化によって保存された Due to the apocope and gemination of 「いち」, the original form of 「ぽん」has remained. にほん 母音間に挟まれたという条件下で、唇音退化が進行し「ほん」に結実 surrounded by vowels, labial weakening had proceed into 「ほん」. さんぼん 発音の音色については遡行同化、「ぼん」の有声化については順行同化が起こった ...


5

1. "Is there phonological explanation that can explain about changing of these sound?" If you are asking about the general rule, for h → b, it's 連濁 (rendaku) "compound voicing", in case you don't know. There is a great answer with a dedicate tag on this site, as well as an independent article on Wikipedia. For h → p thing, it's called 促音便 (sokuonbin), or ...


2

The 声優{せいゆう}, voice actor pronounces 私はツェッペリ男爵{だんしゃく}だ as in the original scene. But he uses turn of the phrase from the noble. It might sound more different to your ear than as usual. And the assertion「だ」sounds stronger than「く」to emphasize dignity and his upbringing. It might confuse you. The original scene from Jojo below actually put furigana-ruby for ...


3

Aeon. Before you learn which is better, you have to know that furigara is not the same as pronunciation. Certainly furigana shows us how to read its kanji, but we sometimes don't write small hiragana or katakana because we didn't have such sounds before Kamakura Period. Hiragana and katakana are not so precise phonograms. The answer is Buddha, ブッダ. I've ...


-2

https://furigana.info/w/仏陀 (based on old fiction): 60% of ぶっだ >< 30% of ぶつだ (plus weird people who want to spell ほとけ thus and similar). kanshudo.com/searchq?q=仏陀 (based on modern use): 90% ぶっだ >< 10% ぶつだ. Thus, it at least seems that ぶっだ is the more popular reading, and ぶつだ actually loses prominence.


1

The simple answer is that there aren't enough sounds. There are set sounds for the vowels "e", "i", "a", "o", and "u", as well as 40 other standard sounds and one standalone "n." These sounds are "k", "s", "t", "n", "h", "r", which each have the full three kana, as well as "y" that has three kana and "w" that has two (Okinawan has two other "w"s in we and ...


8

The amount of kanji is irrelevant because they are a writing system. The thing is that, when writing a foreign word in japanese, what happens is that the sound of the word is aproximated to the sounds available in the Japanese language, and then it can be written down using a Japanese syllabary such as hiragana or katakana (not Kanji). What you see in ...


14

Disclaimer - this is a simplified answer, but ... As with any language, you must differentiate between the actual sounds (phonology) and the writing system which represents the language (orthography). Although there are several thousand kanji characters which form the basis of the writing system (2136 on the official list), that doesn't mean there are ...


-1

The game seems to be focussing on creating interesting/fun/cool names by freely using katakana words. So even though グラン and グランド are indeed the "French" and "English" versions of the word grand, here they are 100% equivalent and I have no doubt that グラン would have been replaced by グランド if the creators had thought that it sounded better. クローネ is not a well-...


0

You're right, 日本 pronunciation is based on the on-yomi of each kanji. 本 has only one on-yomi : "hon", so no problem here. 日 has two though : "nichi" (go-on) and "jistu" (kan-on). You can "understand the situation" of 日本 being nowadays read "nihon" or "nippon" through its history : it is thought to have evolved from the go-on reading "nichihon" (ニチホン) to "...


-1

I am not sure about the グラン and グランド are always interchangeble. So, I skip this and move onto クローネ. I think you are correct to assume クローネ comes from 八咫烏{やたがらす}:yatagarasu. And 八咫烏{やたがらす} is the symbol of national football of Japan. Then, the author wished Japanese football team will win the tournaments or some titles. Therefore,I reckon the suffix-"ne" ...


6

There are no strict rules for how a word written in kanji translates to reading. There are rule of thumbs, but they do not give a strict indication. At best, they will give you a 40% chance to correctly guess a word's reading from its kanji. Which isn't trivial, but far from reliable. Most of the stuff you've learned about onyomi or kunyomi is basically ...


13

(First, 日本 is pronounced like nippon or nihon, but not nitsuhon.) Unfortunately, there are tons of irregularities and exceptions regarding the readings of words, and you have to master them individually, word by word. Pronunciations change over time, but spellings tend not to change. In the case of Japanese, there are even kanji words that completely ignore ...


22

There are three readings for 日本: にほん, にっぽん, and やまと. The last reading is non-standard as far as general use. The first two are still used often, but にほん is by far the de rigueur reading currently. Possibly you are reading something old, where 日本 is written as につぽん. While today, a repeating consonant is written with a small tsu (っ), in the past it was often ...


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