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4

Well, the matter is really complicated. And the simple dichotomy of “on” vs. “kun” does not work. The Japanese names (let’s concentrate on masculine, feminine are more egregious) used in modern Japan come from several types of formerly existing names, not counting new types that emerged quite recently. I believe your list can exemplify all of those. 1) ...


2

It is indeed quite common to give names which are (partially) intended as names from Western languages, for example (女)えりか、えみり、まりえ、もにか、にいな or (男)れお、れおん、ろびん、れい、… Of course some names lend themselves to this process more than others and it is not at all uncommon to use kanji to write the name, for example 愛利歌【えりか】 or 玲旺【れお】. The child can nevertheless use the ...


2

I have never been taught how to read 田 in surname, but I think in most case the start with 田 in surname such as 田中, 田村, 田口, 田辺, 田島, 田地野, etc. is pronounced as「た」. And, I think pronouncing the end with 田 in surname as「だ」appearing in 吉田{よしだ}, 山田{やまだ}, 池田{いけだ}, 前田{まえだ} is more common than pronouncing it as「た」appearing in 太田{おおた}, 森田{もりた}, 柴田{しばた}, 藤田{ふじた}, etc....


2

So first of all, Japanese kanji can almost always be pronounced in several different ways, and which way they are pronounced will depend entirely on the context (what other kanji or non-kanji (kana) characters they're combined with in which ways). This is due to a long history of intermingling of meanings and usages between Chinese characters and the ...


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