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5

I don't think it's quite a catch-all phrase, but I guess people may use ゼミ for smaller specialized classes with more professor–student interaction, even if the professor actually gives all the lectures/talks. (I guess in this case you would use "course" and not "seminar" in English.) I don't think ゼミ would be used for the main compulsory classes in an ...


2

・ I could not find any specific data on this, but if I would guess, I'd say that is natural, maybe almost automatic, that when the speaker are trying to associate with English culture or something imagined as being of English origin the speaker would use グランド, and the same should occur with the French グラン. As グランプリ is of French origin the "french" way is ...


1

I believe it's simply the way the word was borrowed. Each English or other loanword in Japanese has or eventually acquires a standard writing. Of course some have more than one accepted writing, but the point is the transliteration can seem arbitrary or like it's more different from the original language's pronunciation than it is. Indeed, in some cases it ...


2

The other answers have pointed out that ウィ is the preferred kana combination, which also happens to be the standard suggestion if I type wi on my Japanese keyboard in kana mode. This answer will attempt to state why ワィ would be a bad choice. The most common kana to be followed by small kana are those of the /i/ series used together with ゃゅょ to form ...


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