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2

I feel like the third case, without something like 一緒に, would be more like "whom I will eat and drink" (cannibalism), and that the second example is the natural interpretation of the sentence, because a comma/pause would definitely be inserted before 飲む, for the first one. ...But it'd still come across awkwardly, and I feel like 私が食べる、そして[...] would express ...


4

You can use 戦士が隠した王の宝を奪った. Technically, it is indeed ambiguous: 戦士が隠した王の宝を奪った。 I stole the treasure of the king which the warrior hid. I stole the treasure of the king who the warrior hid. Practically, however, the verb 隠す tends to be connected with a noun which is usually hidden, which is 宝 in this sentence. Almost everyone would take this ...


6

This sentence can either mean "The one I want to protect is you" or it can mean "the one who wants to protect (someone else) is you". Yes, it can mean both. Any way to distinguish besides context? No, there is no way to distinguish besides context. But when you write a sentence like this, you can simply add a が-/を-phrase to disambiguate. When a が-marked ...


1

I know that relative clauses are generally made with the following format. sentence/verb/adjective + noun Strictly speaking, a relative clause refers only to the part before the modified noun. 本をよんでいる学生 is not a relative clause although it has a relative clause. The grammatically correct way to explain this phrase is "本を読んでいる is a relative ...


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