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in sentence "忘れられない夜にする" does verb "忘れる" have the function of an adjective? Yes, because it is modifying a noun. The meaning of it here is as if the English adjective "unforgettable". What is the meaning of the phrase? It means "Make this an unforgettable evening". The "ni suru" part means "make this". Who is making it so depends on context but usually ...


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does verb "忘れる" have the function of an adjective - You usually call it an embedded clause, or a relative clause (in English grammar). The meaning is: the night that I cannot forget. But you are right, technically it serves as an adjective, is this case as an i-adjective. is there any way to make Verbs have a Japanese adjective function? - Every clause in ...


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It is your choice what to want to keeep and what you want to lose when you translate from one language to another. If you seek an English equivalent of ので, you cannot preserve both the ordering of clauses and the position of pauses. If you privilege the ordering of clauses, than "so" or "therefore" will be preferrable, because they come after the causal ...


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「なんで馬場{ばば}ジムはどいつもこいつも負{ま}かした俺{おれ}を頼{たよ}りにしてくんだか… 所沢君{ところざわくん}に続{つづ}いて・・」 You are reading the 「負かした俺」 part the other way around. The one who has been beaten is the speaker and the one who beat the speaker is 馬場ジム (or someone from that gym). 「所沢君に続いて」 means 「所沢君に続いて君までも」, which is what the speaker refers to by 「どいつもこいつも」. 「どいつもこいつも」 is certainly often ...


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I think that here 誰か doesn’t mean who but somebody. Moreover , it has an adjectival function. If you regard 誰か as an adjective i.e. translate it as “any” instead of “anybody”, then the structure becomes obvious. “ Is there (いるか) any (誰か) person who wants to go (行きたい人)? “


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I'd say it's not a double-headed relative clause, because it's actually 誰か[[[行きたい]人]いる]? That is to say, 誰か is modifying the full predicate of 「行きたい人いる?」. You can scramble to 「行きたい人誰かいる?」, which supports that 誰か is not in the relative clause. However, even with this analysis, it is a somewhat confusing grammatical structure, since 行きたい人 and 誰か could ...


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You can say 私が手紙を送ったのは彼だった. This 私が is more or less important. If you omitted 私が, the sentence would become ambiguous: 手紙を送ったのは彼だった。 He is the one who sent a letter (to someone). He is the one I sent a letter to. The use of あげる cannot solve this type of ambiguity (手紙を送ってあげたのは彼だった is still ambiguous the same way). And even the following ...


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