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42

There are a number of common suffixes you can use to try to guess. Here is an incomplete list of common suffixes which are a pretty safe bet: Female ko 子 mi 美 ka 花・華 e 江・恵 na 奈・菜 no 乃 ri 里 Male rō 郎 ta 太 suke 介・助・祐 o 男・夫・雄・生 ya 哉・也 kichi 吉 hiko 彦 nobu 信 Also, "girly" kanji—like 愛 "love", 幸 "happiness", 華 "flower", 美 "beauty" etc.—or hiragana will ...


36

It's a double hyphen, not an equals sign. One of its uses is when transliterating names that have a hyphen in them. This is to avoid confusion with the extended sound symbol (ー) in Japanese. For example: クロード・レヴィ=ストロース (Claude Lévi-Strauss) Another time when the double hyphen is used is when in the original language, there is a stop in the sound. Your ...


24

According to this page, the following types of characters are allowed in names: 名づけ(命名)に使える文字と記号 ひらがな(ゐ・ゑも含む) カタカナ(ヰ・ヱも含む) 「ー」(音をのばすときに使う。例:リリー、サリー) 「ゝ」(一つ前の字の繰り返しのとき使う。例:なゝえ) 「ゞ」(一つ前の字に濁音を付けて繰り返しのとき使う。例:みすゞ) 「々」((一つ前の漢字の繰り返しのとき使う。例:奈々) So that's hiragana, katakana, extension, and repetition marks. Valid examples are given for each in the ...


20

It's a pun. In fact, many, many of Dragonball's characters are puns on food (or food-related) items: サイヤ人 Saiyajin from [ヤサイ]{野菜}人 "vegetable people" ベジータ Vegeta from ベジタブル "vegetable" ウーロン Oolong from 烏龍 (type of tea) ピラフ Pilaf ランチ Lunch ヤムチャ Yamcha from 飲茶【やむちゃ】 (snacks & tea) カリン塔【とう】 Korin Tower from 花林糖【かりんとう】 (type of sweets) バーダック Burdock from 牛蒡【...


18

It's like this: Teacher: 「野田{のだ} 努{つとむ}さん。」 野田: 「はい。」 T: 「いわい 隆{たかし}さんですかね?しゅくさんですか?」(the surname reads 祝) 祝: 「はふりです。」 T: 「はふりって読むんですか。珍しい名前ですね。はふり たかしさん。」 祝: 「はい。」 This conversation has actually taken place in my twelfth grade first classroom. Note: People with easy-to-read names don't end up in this kind of awkward conversation very often. Still, ...


17

Why is the Japanese government considering adding kanji such as “cancer” to the jinmeiyō kanji? I do not think that the government is trying to add these kanji to the set of jinmeiyō kanji. I think that some people are confused by the unclear description in Wikipedia. At least I was confused at first. So probably it is useful to clarify it. Article 50 ...


16

Just from personal experience (purely anecdotal), I came across a few Chinese people who all used their original characters hanzi pretty regularly in work scenarios, normally without furigana (name badges, shift schedules, etc). Anybody who sees your name written thus should know from your surname that you are not Japanese, they will likely ask you how to ...


15

Generally speaking these are read using the 音読み, and most frequently occur in pairs (e.g. 日米【にちべい】, 日独【にちどく】). I actually did some trolling through EDICT and a couple other sources to create a master list of these, and came up with the following list: 豪 ごう Australia 爾 る Argentina 墺 おう Austria 白 ぱく Belgium 戊 ぼ Bolivia 伯 ぱく Brazil 勃 ぼつ ...


14

Part A 常用漢字{じょうようかんじ} (Jōyō Kanji) and 人名用漢字{じんめいようかんじ} (Jinmeiyō Kanji) are two separate and non-overlapping lists, but Kanji used in a person's name can be from either list. 常用漢字 are the most common in names as well as in general, but because Kanji used in many names are more unique and diverse than these more common Kanji, the 人名用漢字 list was created so ...


12

This phenomenon mainly occurs in orthodox brand/shop names. Quite a few traditional-style Japanese restaurants are officially named like もり川【かわ】 and 三【み】むら, even though 森【もり】 and 村【むら】 are not difficult kanji at all. I haven't wondered why, but according to this question and this question, this tradition seems to have originated from the belief that even ...


12

Well I don't know about school per se, but every form I've seen so far (Foreign registration, tax, social security, subscription to various utilities...) asks you to not only write your name, but specify the pronunciation using Furigana. See for example this generic contact form: It has a 名前{なまえ} field, split into 姓{せい} and 名{めい} for family name and surname....


12

Does 'yuki' really mean happiness? I feel like this is a loaded question, so let's break it down. The character 幸 means "happiness". If the name ゆき is written using this kanji, then it also means "happiness". ゆき by itself does not necessarily mean anything—ゆ and き simply represent sounds. However, context could easily provide a meaning to those sounds, ...


12

Both マルクス and マーカス are common transcriptions of the name Markus or Marcus. Roughly speaking you can think of マルクス as a more German/Scandinavian-sounding transcription and マーカス as a more English-sounding transcription. The English pronunciation of Marcus is [[ˈmɑːrkəs]]. The English //r// can be silent (e.g. [[ˈmɑːkəs]]) and often is transcribed as a ...


11

This sounds tautological, but the fact is, having a foreign-looking name in this largely homogeneous country strongly signals that you are foreign. A big question is whether you want to be broadcasting this signal. Growing up among many haafu and other mixed-race kids, I know first-hand how annoying it can be. Of course, once in a while someone will ...


11

I guess your coworker uses hiragana の simply because it is easier to write and 野 is very common in surnames and the natural guess for の.¹ Hiragana (or katakana) or variant kanji may also be used in surnames to simplify writing, such as 早せ川 (早瀬川) or 斎藤 (齋藤). However, you wouldn't use shorthand in (formal) correspondence like emails, etc. ¹ You can check ...


11

That P (simply read ピー) stands for プロデューサー ("Producer"). Traditionally, P has been used like a name suffix for a super-high executive in the showbiz/broadcasting/anime industry (someone even higher than a "D", or 監督/director). However, after the success of the Idolm@aster franchise, where a "producer" has a role closer to that ...


10

The つ character you're talking about is commonly referred to as "little つ" and looks like っ. This characters is not actually pronounced, but rather it means to take a small pause. In the case of にっぽん, instead of pronouncing it as "nitsupon", you would be pronouncing it like "ni [small pause] pon" which is romanised as "nippon" which has a natural pause ...


10

First, even native Japanese adults can correctly guess the reading of the kanji names of, say, only 90% of students, at most. Quite a few people have names (either first names or surnames) with really unpredictable readings. How do attendance checks in school classes deal with this one issue? Are students' names written in Kanji only? The answer is 'yes, ...


10

Several points the second-to-last character in 東亞学園バレㅡ部 is U+3161 HANGUL LETTER EU (from Korean), it should be ー U+30FC KATAKANA-HIRAGANA PROLONGED SOUND MARK. This is probably why Google Translate doesn't quite know what to do with it. バレー部 is short for バレーボール部 and means "volleyball team/club" (by the way, ballet is written バレエ) 亞 is the kyūjitai (old ...


10

膣子 and 醜子 are not real person names. They may be possible as funny pen names or such, but for real person names, they are out of the question. I doubt a local government will accept registrations of such names. Looks like #names function of jisho.org is severely broken and vandalized. Many results seem to be poor-quality machine generated readings, but ...


9

Words brought to Japan from English speakers and which end in 'y' are usually pronounced with extended 'i' sound.


9

I read it [青水庵]{せいすいあん} if there's no hint. But, I googled this name and found an illustrator (NSFW) who calls himself [青水庵]{あおみずあん}. Why I read せいすいあん first? 庵 can be read as either あん and いおり. In case of this, since 庵 occurs directly after other kanji in a group, the general rule is to read all kanji using the Chinese pronunciation ([音読]{おんよ}み) in general....


9

The reason is that parents choose the kanji for their meaning. Depending on the kanji chosen, the suggested meaning is different, for example 美智子 — "beautiful wise child" 美千子 — "child of a thousand beauties" 見知子 — "child of recognition" 道子 — "child of the way" 路子 — "child of the road" 倫子 — "child of morals" 皆子 — "child of all" 通子 — "child of passage" (...


9

I think it's [4]{よ}[6]{ろ}[4]{し}[9]{く}......


9

II, III, IV... would be 「2世{せい}」「3世{せい}」「4世{せい}」, ... as in: Johann Strauss II → 「ヨハン・シュトラウス2世{せい}」 Junior, senior would be 「ジュニア」「シニア」, as in: Martin Luther King, Jr. → 「マーティン・ルーサー・キング・ジュニア」


9

I think that either ハニーフ or ハニフ is probably what you want. As has been mentioned in the comments, both seem to be used by people with the same name. I think the best way to choose between the two is to use the pronunciation/intonation in your native language as a guide: if you pronounce your name as Hanif (i.e. the stress on the first syllable / short i), ...


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