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19

They are both slightly different simplifications of the traditional Chinese character which is 變. 变 is the simplified Chinese and 変 the shinjitai, i.e. the Japanese simplification. Often the simplifications are the same, but it also often happens that traditional Chinese characters have slightly different simplifications in Chinese and Japanese, for ...


17

The character in question was originally composed of 歯 (teeth) and 巳 (child). It represented children's teeth. This later became 齔 and 齓. 齔 is typically preferred over 齓, so I will use it below. It has two primary meanings: 1) in children, the replacement of old teeth with new teeth; 2) children of an age in which they are loosing their old teeth and growing ...


16

Just from personal experience (purely anecdotal), I came across a few Chinese people who all used their original characters hanzi pretty regularly in work scenarios, normally without furigana (name badges, shift schedules, etc). Anybody who sees your name written thus should know from your surname that you are not Japanese, they will likely ask you how to ...


15

In the olden days Japanese scholarly works were written in 漢文, which is basically Classical Chinese. Together with a set of annotation rules (e.g. "read the next two characters backwards", "insert a particle here", etc.) it was possible to translate/transcribe the resulting Chinese text into Japanese. Nowadays, it would still be possible to render Japanese ...


14

What is the etymology of the phrase 隴を得て蜀を望む? We can reorder the characters to get 得隴望蜀, which is a Chinese-language yojijukugo. This phrase may reference a few unrelated historical events. The earliest such event is about Emperor Guangwu of Han reunifying the Gansu region into Han territory then turning his sights on Sichuan (see Emperor Guangwu of Han's ...


10

Henshall writes on p.130 of A Guide to Remembering Japanese Characters: 艹 is plant 9. 央 is center 429 q.v., here acting phonetically to express bloom and possibly lending an idea of blocked off at the head from its assumed original meaning of person yoked at the neck. 426 originally meant a flower that blossomed but lacked seed, such a flower being ...


10

Short answer: probably yes, but we don't know a lot about it. We don't have enough documentation about the earliest stages of Japanese to be sure, but the consensus is that a bunch of the oldest words must have come from Chinese and other languages. It would be hard not to, since they were in contact all the time, and the original Japanese speakers came ...


10

No, 曖昧 on its own does not mean 曖昧な関係 in Japanese. The following article written in Japanese explains 曖昧 has broader meanings in Chinese. 【中国語】曖昧 àimèi この中国語の「曖昧」は、日本語より意味が広くて、日本語と同じ意味のほかに、まず「怪しい、胡散臭い、疑わしい」という意味があります。 最近は特に「友達以上、恋人未満」的な男女関係を表す語としてよく使われています。上の楊丞琳の曲名も、この意味の「曖昧」です。 例えば、傍からみていると、二人の言動は恋人同士のように見えるけど、実のところはそうではない関係。或いは、...


10

Using 2,136 as a reference number (total number of Jōyō kanji) There are 3,079 unique* characters which form the 2,136 most frequent Mainland Chinese + Taiwan Chinese characters. 1,567 Jōyō Kanji are part of these 3,079 characters, while 569 are not*. There are 1,023 characters in the 2,136 Mainland Chinese most frequent characters that are not part of ...


10

It's like this: 中国人: "a person with Chinese nationality" 漢人: "a person from the Han dynasty" "a person of Han (Chinese) ethnicity" 華人: "a person of ethnically Han ancestry living outside of China" 唐人: "a person from the Tang dynasty" "a Seric; a Cathayan" The word 中国人 (#1) is by far the most common word corresponds to English Chinese, that is what most ...


10

As far as Japanese is concerned, loanwords (外来語) usually refer to words brought into Japan from countries other than China and written in katakana. But strictly speaking, it depends on how you define loanwords. Many on-yomi Sino-Japanese words had been around even before Japanese people learned how to write their own native words, so IMHO it doesn't make ...


9

It's a question somehow unanswered for a fairly long time, while it doesn't seem to be too complicated to answer. If I am reading a Chinese text to a Japanese audience, how can I know which reading to use for each character? Of the 音読み, there can be 呉音, 漢音, and 唐音 to choose from. There are two major types of situation to read Classical Chinese text in ...


9

With well-educated young adults, it's likely that you can. Japanese junior high and high school students learn kanbun (i.e. ancient Chinese poems and literature) at school in a very unique way with some special marks that compensate for the difference in grammar. Those with ambition of going to top colleges would study the subject very hard, so you might ...


8

Kanjigen lists 齔{シン} (U+9F54) together with 齓{シン} (U+9F53), and as far as I can tell the former is more common, though I'm not sure either are commonly used (I think 乳歯{にゅうし} might be much more common to mean "baby tooth"). It says it can refer to: (シンす) (verb/noun) The losing of teeth which occurs around the age of 7 or 8. Or, the teeth one has prior to ...


8

Why do these people think that there is some Chinese element to these books? Because 「语」「测」「试」 are Simplified Chinese. We use 「語」「測」「試」(or 「試験」 for 「测试」 and 「文法」 for 「语法」) in Japanese.


8

1. Why is the verb 狭{せば}む so rare/weird? As user naruto said in the comments, the reason you don't see 狭{せば}む much in modern Japanese (and that your input method can't handle it) is that this is a Classical Japanese (bungo 文語) verb, of the shimo-nidan conjugation; it inflects as 狭め(ぬ), 狭め(て), 狭む(ぞ), 狭むる(人), 狭むれ(ど), 狭めよ(!). (If you want to learn more, you ...


7

This question could probably be answered on different levels, but here is what you might want to know for starters because that is what I, an average Japanese-speaker, know. The key word here is phonetics, not orthography. [大和言葉]{やまとことば} are the words that existed when Japanese was only a spoken language. Sounds were everything we had to express ...


7

In the dictionary 字通【じつう】 (1996), we find: [3] よく温熟する、ならう、たずねる。 In addition, the dictionary 類聚名義抄【るいじゅみょうぎしょう】 (approx. 12th century) lists* the following meanings for 温: アタゝム・タツヌ・ウルフ・ツゝム・シル・アタゝカナリ・ウツクシ・ヤハラカナリ 尋【たず】ねる (or rather, タツヌ) is the second listed. Moving on now to Chinese sources, in 漢典, it is written: (2) 复习 [review] 温故而知新。——《礼记·中庸》...


7

My dictionary 漢字源 lists as meanings {名} はな。はなぶさ。中央がくぼみ、芯を含んだような形をしたはな。→ 華 {形・名} うるわしい。すぐれている。ひいでた者。「英雄」「英明」。 & 4. [omitted] The literal meaning being related to a flower, the extended meaning being "lovely" or "outstanding" or "someone skillful". The words 英雄 "hero" and 英明 "intelligent" are listed under this extended meaning.


7

Do you mean words or sentences? For word, they can understand common words exist in both Chinese and Japanese and have the same meaning, of course. But there are still words that exist only in Chinese or Japanese, and words having different (or opposite) meaning in Chinese and Japanese. Like 娘 means daughter in Japanese, but mother in Chinese. For ...


7

This answer won't be very helpful if you're looking for a general rule that is followed. There was a Chinese girl in my Japanese class, and she asked the teacher how she should write and pronounce her name. However, the teacher replied with something that seems plainly obvious now that I know of it. The teacher told her that it's her name so it's her ...


7

I feel that at the extremes of stroke order perfection foreigners always seem to be better than native Japanese, maybe because there are just too many who make it a pastime to know all stroke orders for all sorts of obscure 漢字. Unless you are dealing with a 書道 teacher (or school teacher), the general focus is more on whether you are able to remember all ...


7

The レ点 means first read the next character (that is the character below since it was written from top to bottom at that time) then read the previous character. Ex: 帰ル(レ点)国ニ should read 国に帰る. Before, the レ点 was called [雁金点]{かりがねてん} because it looks like a goose which is flying (雁{かり}が飛ぶ姿) . You can see that first the symbol is going down then going up. That ...


7

According to the Wiktionary entry, the 母 portion is purely phonetic -- that is, it has to do with the [ancient] Chinese pronunciation.


7

The answer is no. Some na-adjectives are from Western languages (e.g., スマートな, アバンギャルドな) and some are from native Japanese words (e.g., 朗らかな, 静かな). As an aside, there are also a few i-adjectives coined from English (e.g., エモい, エロい, ラグい), although they are mostly slang. As for spelling, it is true that the dictionary forms of most na-adjectives are written in ...


7

There is always trade-off, as you said. Thus naturally we have both approaches, depending on what policy and objective you have. Your #1 is called 訓読 ("interpretative reading") in Japanese, and considered normal. As it is a form of literal translation, you can relatively easily get the meaning, at the cost of original prosody. Fortunately, Japanese verse ...


7

According to Morohashi (大漢和辞典), the original Literary Sinitic meaning of the compound word, 勉強 [m-jenX g-jangX] are indeed different: "1. Strive with all effort. 2. Put effort in study. 3. Do business with small profit margin. 4. Section from the book 顔氏家訓. 5. (modern Mandarin) force; compel." In fact, definitions like this are closer to the modern Japanese ...


6

It may be impossible to do with old texts written in 万葉仮名 (man'yôgana), which is to say that chinese characters where used only for their phonetic value, not their meaning… Without proper boundaries to the question, the answer ranges from "kind of" as user1205935 said, to "not at all".


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