31

The dots, called 傍点【ぼうてん】 (or 圏点【けんてん】), function like italics or underline with the Latin alphabet. They are for emphasis. To see the effect in rōmaji: futatabi kanojo jishin no kuchi kara kiku koto ni naru to wa Update. To answer the question in the comments, 傍点 and ふりがな may be combined (although ふりがな may also be omitted, as in the snippet in the ...


26

ローマ字 is ローマ plus 字【じ】. It's a noun+noun compound, just like 漢字【かんじ】 or アメリカ人【じん】. It is not the English adjective Roman plus 字, so there's no reason for an ン to be there. Writing romanji is a common beginner's mistake. There isn't really any linguistic significance to it, and you should avoid making this mistake yourself. The Japanese place name ローマ ...


25

This is a summary of this Wikipedia article. A math book called 塵劫記【じんこうき】 published in 1627, was the first book that described (and probably defined) how to count large numbers in Japanese. In the first edition of the book, actually there was no "4-digit grouping" as we know today, at least for relatively small numbers (smaller than 1 極【ごく】). A different ...


25

Yes, mixtures of this type are possible, and it's quite common with certain words. For example, 石鹸 has a rather difficult second kanji, and the word is often written 石けん instead. 轟音 is often written ごう音. And so on. In your example, none of the characters is particularly rare and all of them are on the 常用漢字表 (the official jōyō kanji chart), so ...


22

ハ for the topic particle. There's no difference from hiragana.


22

As in many other languages, Japanese has gone through a number of both major and minor pronunciation changes. English is certainly no exception, either. Why do English-speakers continue to spell words like "knight" and "daughter" as such when they no longer pronounce those words the way they are spelt? Japanese has experienced the same problem of ...


21

When being used as a grammatical particle ([助詞]{じょし}), は is pronounced わ (wa), を is pronounced お (o), and へ (which you may not have come across yet) is pronounced え (e). I've never used Rosetta Stone but it seems quite strange that it would not mention this... Information as to the historical reason for this difference between spelling and pronunciation ...


20

There's even an exceptional word which mixes hiragana, katakana, and kanji, くノ一. Generally speaking, words are written with mixed writing systems when there are reasons to write different parts in different ways. (Sounds obvious, huh?) For example, in Tokyo Nagoya's example of あんパン, the first morpheme comes from Chinese 餡{あん}, and the second from ...


19

They are both slightly different simplifications of the traditional Chinese character which is 變. 变 is the simplified Chinese and 変 the shinjitai, i.e. the Japanese simplification. Often the simplifications are the same, but it also often happens that traditional Chinese characters have slightly different simplifications in Chinese and Japanese, for ...


16

The basic answer is that は is written ハ in katakana. However, I think it depends on why it's written in katakana. One reason you might write something in katakana is to communicate pronunciation, and in this case the particle は would be written ワ: spelling pronunciation おはよう オハヨー こんにちは コンニチワ You can see this sort of use of ...


15

Roman Jakobson famously said: "Languages differ essentially in what they must convey and not in what they may convey." His point was that every language can sufficiently convey any idea that can be expressed in another language. The difference is that for each language there are some properties that must be specified when an idea is conveyed, even though ...


15

There's a quick way to know this. The place where a space can be inserted is roughly the same place where ね can be naturally inserted. あらわれでたのはね、 くろマントにね、くろいね、ぼうしのね、さんにんぐみ。 それはそれはね、こわーいね、どろぼうさまのね、おでかけだ。 Actually this structure is known as 文節. Basically, a 文節 starts with a noun/adjective/verb/adverb/etc, optionally followed by one or more subsidiary ...


15

Japanese elementary school children are generally taught to write kanji like this (教科書体): I don't know how these are different from how Chinese kids are taught to write these characters. However, this largely depends on the font, and adults actually handwrite these dots in many ways according to their preference. Practically, there is no strict rule here, ...


14

Yes, it's common to write in that way. Writing いづみ instead of いずみ and 買ひ instead of 買い are a part of the Historical Kana Orthography (歴史的仮名遣). Writing katakana instead of hiragana is considered more formal in old days. See 歴史的仮名遣 and 片仮名 歴史的仮名遣とは ... 明治から第二次世界大戦終結直後までの公文書や学校教育において用いられたものであり、平安時代初期までの発音を反映した表記であると仮想されたものを基点としている。 The Historical Kana ...


14

Heads up: Some of this is going to be a bit obscure. Wikipedia covers some of this ground; examples consisting of proper names, place names, etc. were checked via Japanese Wikipedia articles. ウィ、ウ、ウェ、ウォ Due to holes in the ワ column (including the general restriction of 「ヲ」 to grammatical duties), 「ウ」can pair with other vowels to replicate /w/ ...


14

Exclamation marks are one way (as in English), and often a っ before an exclamation mark can give the effect of increased volume. They can even be repeated or put into katakana for more emphasis. 黙れ! vs 黙れっ! vs 黙れッッ!! Japanese writing also seems to have less rigor in its literature-writing rules than English, so you can probably get away with repeating ...


12

I'm Japanese native speaker. In my opinion, little "っ" at the end of sentence is not pronounced at all. However, it often indicates "small" (not so serious) emotions of speaker, I'll show you some example, comparing with other two expressions for writing: 01. ふざけんなよっ 02. ふざけんなよ… 03. ふざけるなよ! (All sentences mean "Don't be silly") As you see, first sentence is ...


12

You can see it's ハ as what the old MS office assistant F1 said You can also see the usage of ヲ in the above sentence As a side note the text above isn't a translation of the English version Unfortunately F1 is the only one who talks in Katakana. Here are the other Japanese assistants and English assistants


12

To tell the truth, this question was so unexpected for me who am not familiar with colloquial English that I couldn't figure out what it means if it weren't for an English speaker's guidance. Maybe I still don't grasp what you're asking, but there are so many reasons it couldn't be with ン. "Roman" in Japanese In English, Roman is an adjective derives from ...


12

If we want an authoritative source, we could look at the official terminology used by the Japanese government as set out by the Agency of Cultural Affairs (文化庁) (might be familiar name to some people as their page about 二重敬語 gets referenced here sometimes). They start by saying only to use kanji from 常用漢字表・付表 in the normal form of the character. They go on ...


12

The conventional Japanese tally follows the stroke order for 正. So if the total were 8, it'd look like [正下], and if it were 20, it'd be [正正正正] This link shows an animation for the stroke order: http://kakijun.jp/page/sei200.html


12

This text is written left-to-right because the person in the picture is facing to the left. There was a rule that when you put some text (chinese poem, haiku, etc.) in a portrait, the first line must be determined by the orientation of the face. When the person was facing to the left, the text had to be written from left to right. Some sources say this rule ...


12

I wouldn't necessarily say 々 is used to avoid having to write the same kanji again, but rather to make it clear that the word is obtained by duplication of a character — moreover the reading should be doubled (with rendaku where applicable). For example, 日本国語大辞典 (via kotobank.jp) has のま【々】 (「々」が、かたかなの「ノ」と「マ」を組み合わせたように見えるところからの通称。「ノマ」とかたかなで表記する) ...


11

Generally in Japanese handwriting the more feminine something is the more rounded out and cute it will be. If I think of girly English writing I think of neat bubbly letters while guys tend to be sloppy and angular. This carries over to Japanese. Additional reading: http://guideline.livedoor.biz/archives/51130942.html http://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/...


11

Short answer: no. For details, read on. There aren't any rules (as far as I know, anyway). Generally the insertion of spaces in texts written purely in hiragana serves only to improve readability. The writer can take liberties in doing this. Some common patterns do arise, though. First, you generally tend to break things up word by word, so each ...


11

I think the difference between the is really captured by their appearance alone. As you mentioned, ~ sometimes has a sort of wavy 'tremolo' type feel to it, or at least that's the image evoked by looking at it. I'm not sure how many times you would actually fluctuate the pitch like that in an actual reading, though. I usually associate it with a kind of ...


11

In this webpage 沖縄の言葉で書かれた注意書きがわからなすぎる, there is the following picture: Comparing this one with the one in your post makes me think that maybe it is just your picture is missing some paint.


11

There's a few different things going on in your question: A general question about whether you can write words in mixed kanji kana orthography An implicit question about when you can / cannot do so. Two specific examples Starting with the first question, all Japanese language users including native speakers write some words using a mixture of kana and ...


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