25

「め」 is a suffix of contempt when attached to a noun or another person's name. 「この[犬]{いぬ}め!」= "You stupid dog!" 「[許]{ゆる}せん、[田中]{たなか}め!」= "Will never forgive Tanaka the bastard!" Translation is an art. You could use whatever word you feel appropriate for the context that expresses contempt, scorn, disdain, etc. Please note, however, that it becomes a ...


23

It's short for の家{うち}. You will normally see the abbreviation んち: (1a) 俺の家に来い。 (1b) 俺んちに来い。 (2a) お前の家に行きたいなぁ。 (2b) お前んちに行きたいなぁ。 But in cases where there is already an ん before the abbreviation (like おばあちゃん ends in ん in this case) we just see ち: (3a) タモリさんの家に行きたい。 (3b) タモリさんちに行きたい。 (4a) 明日麻美ちゃんの家に行く。 (4b) 明日麻美ちゃんちに行く。 So your sentences ...


14

The biggest mistake you have made is in trusting that translation, which is not even close to the original. コケ does not mean "fool"; It is not even a noun. It is from the verb こける, which means "to trip over", "to fall down", etc. っぷり comes from ふ り, which means "the manner / way in which one performs an action". 食べっぷりがいい, for instance, means that someone ...


14

When to drop "な" depends on the phrase. 客観的事実 is a very common set phrase, but 印象的事実 is not. You have to usually say "それは印象的な事実(でした)", unless you were a philosopher and ready to give 印象的事実 some definition. 的 is not special; there are several kanji which can connect two nouns and help to make longer compounds without hiragana particles. ~風 (~ style) ...


14

Language is not a science, nor is translation. There should be no such thing as the single best translation for 「~~中{ちゅう}」. Whatever sounds best for the context in the target language would be the best. in, within, during, while, in the middle of, in the course of, under (as in "under investigation" = 「調査中{ちょうさちゅう}」), etc. Thus, no matter what word ...


12

I know さ as a way to nominalize a noun. I'm assuming you mean a way to nominalise an adjective. And that's what we have here. [煙]{けむ}い is an adjective meaning 'smoky'. So [煙]{けむ}さ is the nominalised version meaning 'smokiness'. Could you omit さ without changing the meaning? I guess it's not quite the same, but that's a bit too subtle for my language skills....


12

This is simply an English confusion. When you look up delivery: Delivery or a delivery is the bringing of letters, parcels, or other goods to someone's house or to another place where they want them. Synonyms: handing over, transfer, distribution, transmission The definition above corresponds to 配達. Meanwhile, A delivery of something is the goods that are ...


11

~っぴ/~っち is a sort of "suffix" which generates cute-sounding nicknames. Think of it as an rough equivalent of -ie as in doggie, walkie-talkie, etc. へたっぴ (下手【へた】 + っぴ, clumsy person) けろけろけろっぴ (けろけろ + っぴ) たまごっち (たまご + っち) 弱っぴい itself is not common (probably I haven't seen this before), but it should simply mean "weak boy/guy".


11

Yes, 人【にん】 is a counter "agrees" with person, but no, it cannot play the role of a noun. Counters only makes a number able to modify a noun, but grammar prohibits it from having noun meaning. Thus, if you want to tell "two hundred people" you always have to say 200人【にん】の人【ひと】. It however doesn't mean the noun is not omissible. 村には500人の人が住んでいたが、...


10

The かん here is 間 in kanji, and this is used as a suffix to refer to a span of time. ろくしゅう in your sentence is spelled 六週 in kanji and means "six weeks", but in a way that is more ambiguous than the English. Various suffixes can be added on the end to make things more specific, like 目{め} to mean "the sixth week", or 分{ぶん} to indicate six weeks' worth of ...


10

Totally unrelated. 山 さん [mountain] is a Chinese word "shān" assimilated in Japanese. さん as a honorific suffix is an old さま undergone some phonetical change. There are many homophones in Japanese besides that.


10

「[割]{わ}る」 here means "to dilute". See meaning #II-4 in http://kotobank.jp/jeword/%E5%89%B2%E3%82%8B?dic=pje3&oid=SPJE04759100 「[泡盛]{あわもり}のコーヒー割り」 = "awamori diluted with coffee" Other common terms containing 「割り」: ウイスキーのソーダ割り/[水]{みず}割り [焼酎]{しょうちゅう}のウーロン[茶]{ちゃ}割り


9

There are various agent suffixes or just plain nouns that get used in Japanese, as opposed to the one straightforward -er suffix in English. You've mentioned a few, but all with the on'yomi -- the kun'yomi get used too for at least the following: 手 shu in on'yomi compounds, te in kun'yomi compounds 選手 senshu -- "chosen hand" → player chosen to be on a team ...


9

Yes. ~様 is an honorific and can be easily thought of as a more respectful version of ~さん. It is gender neutral, so it can be used by both men and women when addressing either gender. It is often used when addressing someone of a higher social position, or someone for whom you have high regards. On a day-to-day basis, it's commonly used to address ...


9

This is an example of how 〜上{じょう} can be suffixed to various kinds of media, similar to how we say “on television” or “on the internet” in English. Note that 〜上 can also be used for books/magazines, even though it would be “in a book/magazine” in English. Examples: テレビ上に映し出される映像 ラジオ上での対談 雑誌上のインタビュー パソコン上に保存してあるファイル パンフレット上に書いてあります etc. Interestingly, the ...


9

~分 means "a part/amount that corresponds to ~", "~'s fraction", etc. In this case, it refers to a part of the entire work (not a part of Volume 3 nor a part of one episode). 単行本第三巻予定分 is "the part (of the entire work) which is planned to be included in the third volume". Other examples of 分: 追加分: the added part (as opposed to the original) 来月分: the task ...


9

「つき」is a suffix to a noun, meaning "attached, accompanied with, affected," for example: ひも付き - a string attached 条件付き - condition attached, conditional 期限付き - with a time-limit 賞味期限付き - with a pull-date stipulated [曰]{いわ}くつき(の品) - sth with an odd story behind it 昼食(弁当)付き - a lunch included (in a day-trip fare) 三食付きの宿 - an ...


8

The primary difference is that 出す implies something sudden or unexpected. For example, consider the sentence 私は泣き出した and 私は泣きはじめた. In the first we get a natural expression which implies that you (beyond your control) started crying. The second one is grammatically correct, but by using 始めた you're implying a sense of purpose, like you're making yourself cry ...


8

While in ordinary speech we use 論 as a suffix roughly means "theory on ~; argument for ~", in most of academic fields those ideas are conveyed by 理論 e.g. ひも理論 "string theory", 最適性理論 "optimality theory" or プロスペクト理論 "prospect theory" etc. (except for mathematics, where they seem to use 論 to translate the term "theory"). In academia, the suffix 学 is used to ...


8

The kanji 中 on the end as a kind of suffix generally has two different meanings, depending on context and how it's read. When read as ちゅう: "in the middle of doing; in the state of being", as in l'électeur's examples. When read as じゅう: "all over, throughout; sometime during", as in 体{からだ}中{じゅう} "all over the body, all throughout the body" or 今日{きょう}中{じゅう} "...


8

アメッシュ (a registered trademark Tokyo Metropolitan Government), refers to the system which tells us how much rainfall is observed at each location in the metropolitan area. The data is given in the form of grid, or mesh, consisting of 150m*150m squares (cf. Tokyo Amesh/About Tokyo Amesh) . Apparently this is where -ッシュ comes from.


8

会社【かいしゃ】 kaisha is an independent word meaning "company" or "corporation". In compounds it describes a type of company (and is always pronounced がいしゃ gaisha) 航空会社【くうこうがいしゃ】 kūkō gaisha airline company 証券会社【しょうけんがいしゃ】 shōken gaisha brokerage firm 株式会社【かぶしきがいしゃ】 kabushiki gaisha stock company 社 may be used independently as an abbreviation of 会社, ...


8

We pronounce it じょう like in Example 1 because we have 上 without any particle between it and the previous word, and it simply means 'on'. In Example 1, it kind of works if we call it when, but in general, 上 is used as a suffix to mean as a matter of sth. Its literal meaning is Cautions as a matter of usage or even better, precautions. That's what ...


8

Is it otaku version of -さん? Yes...sort of. Originally, -氏【し】 is a honorific and highly formal name suffix used to refer to someone with high social status. There are several existing questions regarding its non-otaku, "proper" usage on this site: What criteria decides whether to print 「氏」 or 「さん」 at the end of a person's name in newspapers? What does ...


7

It comes from the Classical honorific verb 「[賜]{たま}ふ」, which means "to give (from one in a higher position to one in the lower)". The Modern counterpart is 「お[与]{あた}えになる」 or 「[下]{くだ}さる」. The 「ふ」 has become 「う」 over time as you probably know. This verb can be used as an honorific subsidiary verb following another verb. The Modern counterparts are 「~~てくださる」...


7

After a few minutes of murmuring to myself, I am going to say that basically, the 「~~がり[屋]{や}」 form will stand if the 「~~がり」form stands with an adjective. The naturalness and frequency of use of the 「~~がり屋」 form as an independent word look to be in direct proportion to those of its 「~~がり」form. Among the ones that might not make their way into the ...


7

I think the difference mainly lies in the following. The ~がる forms make an assumption about the described person's internal state, whereas the ~そう form is a statement about the person's external appearance. (Maybe a bit like the difference between sympathy and empathy.) For example for 寒がる・寒そう, using 寒がる refers to your empathizing with the person who is ...


7

Generally there are three choices for the kind of quantifiers addressed here. Although the OP's question uses numeral quantifiers, the same would be true for others, such as すべて, etc. Attributive position That is the case where the quantifier, marked by の, precedes the noun, e.g. the OP's third example. Composition Composition is when the quantifier follows ...


7

According to this article in Japanese WP, -たい is the descendant of Middle Japanese -たし (-tasi), which ultimately traces back to Old Japanese (or Proto-Japonic) いたし (itasi; "sore, acute"). A paper referred by that page argues that this form has changed its meaning taking the path of "painful" → "sorely felt" → "of physiological necessity" → "of emotional ...


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