40

It says 聞いてるし. is 略字 (the handwritten simplified/abbreviated kanji) of 聞. Other kanji with 門, such as 問、間、開、閉 etc., can also be simplified the same way: Other examples of 略字: For more about 略字, see: Ryakuji on Wikipedia


33

It's not real Japanese. It's a munged version of 申します. In Shift_JIS encoding, only the first byte is guaranteed to have the high bit set, which means the second byte can sometimes be the same as a character in the ASCII range. This happens with U+7533 申, for which the second byte is encoded as 0x5C \. If someone is using software that tries to strip ...


30

There is no strict rule about this. It's best not to use this "~" symbol denoting a range, when it's meant to be read out loud by someone. But if you really have to, you can read the "~" symbol as "から" in many cases. 3~4行ごと さんからよんぎょうごと 2月3~5日 にがつみっかからいつか 15~17階 じゅうごかいからじゅうななかい or じゅうごからじゅうななかい 500~600円 ごひゃくえんからろっぴゃくえん or ごひゃくからろっぴゃくえん Note ...


28

It depends on the meaning. 中 used to mean "during / in the process of" must be pronounced ちゅう (as in ジョン's post) インストール中【ちゅう】 now installing 読込【よみこみ】中【ちゅう】 now loading 建築【けんちく】中【ちゅう】 under construction But in other uses, such as "all throughout" or "out of (all the)", it is commonly read じゅう (although it seems that ちゅう is also an option?): 世界【...


23

+: 足{た}す -: 引{ひ}く /: 割{わ}る *: 掛{か}ける And you just say the terms normally in order. So your example of 3 * 4 = 12 would be 3かける4は12. Note that = becomes は, similar to how we use "is" in English. As @blutorange mentioned, you can use イコール to mean "equals," however in most situations you'll be good using は. You learn these things quickly when listening to ...


22

This is the handwritten simplified version of , similar to simplified Chinese . Note however that the simplified Chinese form of the radical has a break, and the "divider" is a single dot-like stroke in the left corner: Meanwhile, the 門 radical is often abbreviated in Japanese handwriting to a 略字{りゃくじ} (ryakuji, "abbreviated character") form. The ...


22

yes, you read 中 as ちゅう , and 中3 as ちゅうさん 中3 is a shorthand way of writing 中学校3年生 which is (Japanese) Junior High School 3rd graders or in other words, 9th graders. so 中3の25% would be "25% of (Japanese) 9th graders" so the full translation of 「中3の25%、短文も理解困難」 is "Twenty-five percent of 9th graders have difficulty understanding short passages." ...


20

I think it matters a lot and that it's best to break from the habit if you intend to speak Japanese long-term. I think for place names it's somewhat understandable because the Kana is obviously there mimicking the native place name, sort of like how a French person (no offense) might say they are from "Paris". However, many people will not understand an ...


18

They both mean "eat", as you no doubt already know. 食{た}べるhowever, is "eat" in the sense of "sit down and have a meal". Not strictly that, but that's more the image. It also means eat as in "sustenance", the food you eat regularly to stay alive. 食{く}う is eat in the sense of "consume", as in one animal eating another. 食う can be used for people, of course, ...


18

It's like this: Teacher: 「野田{のだ} 努{つとむ}さん。」 野田: 「はい。」 T: 「いわい 隆{たかし}さんですかね?しゅくさんですか?」(the surname reads 祝) 祝: 「はふりです。」 T: 「はふりって読むんですか。珍しい名前ですね。はふり たかしさん。」 祝: 「はい。」 This conversation has actually taken place in my twelfth grade first classroom. Note: People with easy-to-read names don't end up in this kind of awkward conversation very often. Still, ...


17

The on'yomi are of course morphemes borrowed from Middle Chinese, so in a sense the sounds of Japanese on'yomi are the sounds of Middle Chinese filtered through Japanese loanword phonology. Of course, the phonetics and phonotactics of Japanese changed over time, so describing the exact process by which we ended up with the sounds we have today is kind of ...


17

Basically, in contemporary Japanese, intransitive 入る = /hairu/. The /iru/ readings are essentially all survivals from an earlier stage in which 入る was just /iru/. (In fact, /hairu/ is basically /hau/ "crawl" + /iru/, which is why sometimes in older texts you see it written 這入る). So your best bet is to assume that 入る is /hairu/ on its own and /ir-/ in ...


16

I don't think there is a "normally" appropriate way. My personal philosophy is never assume you can read someone's name. I suppose last names are easier to make a correct (educated) guess. It seems like they more often use kun-yomi. But they could be on-yomi, or other, lesser-used kun-yomi. I have two friends whose last names are the kanji 金城. However, ...


16

The verbs やめる and とめる are different verbs, although related "in spirit", which is the only excuse for writing them with the same 漢字. Try to think of やめる as "to quit", as in "to quit doing something" or "to quit work". やめる is almost always written in かな. For quitting work you are allowed to use 辞める. とめる (written 止める) means physical stopping and it is thus ...


16

It is native Japanese (和語). It is a compound of kao (顔) and hayui (映ゆい). A simplified view of the phonological development is kapopayu-ki > kaɸoɸayu-ki > kawowayu-ki > kaowayu-ki > kawayu-ki > kawayu-i > kawai-i. Other than the normal p > ɸ > w > Ø, the two major changes are 1) merge of owa > wa and yu > i. 可愛 is ateji (当て字).


16

I looked up in my etymology dictionary (小学館's 日本語源大辞典) :) The answer goes like this: つくも was originally a name of a kind of plant (modern standard name: フトイ; English name is softstem bulrush or great bulrush according to Wikipedia). A compound word つくもがみ < つくも + かみ "disheveled white hair (especially of old women)" was coined, because of its resemblance ...


15

Generally speaking these are read using the 音読み, and most frequently occur in pairs (e.g. 日米【にちべい】, 日独【にちどく】). I actually did some trolling through EDICT and a couple other sources to create a master list of these, and came up with the following list: 豪 ごう Australia 爾 る Argentina 墺 おう Austria 白 ぱく Belgium 戊 ぼ Bolivia 伯 ぱく Brazil 勃 ぼつ ...


15

さんどう is often an alternative name for a 登山道【とざんどう】 (a mountain trail/path where cars cannot pass). Modern hikers/trekkers normally use さんどう or とざんどう. For example 増毛山道 is a さんどう. When 山道 is combined with another kango noun (e.g. 山道整備, 山道調査), it's read さんどう. Outside trekking contexts, やまみち and さんどう are largely interchangeable, but I feel it tends to be read ...


14

It is read as めい. “ユーザ名” is read as ユーザめい, “Skype 名” is スカイプめい. I do not know the reason for that, but if I make a guess, this may be because gairaigo in a compound word is treated in a similar way to Sino-Japanese words.


14

Numbers written with Arabic numerals are usually positional. The place value of each digit depends on its position in the sequence: 1b2 + 2b1 + 3b0 = 123 Numbers written with kanji are typically non-positional. Although they usually appear in the same order, rather than use position alone to indicate their place value, they're generally combined with ...


14

Most of the time, kanji are used to write words or parts of words—prefixes, suffixes, and so on. To know which reading is appropriate, you have to know the relevant Japanese words or parts of words. For example, look at the following:  にほんじん  'Japanese person/people' アメリカじん  'American(s)' がいこくじん  'foreigner(s)' Here, we have a suffix じん ...


14

Am I going in the right direction with this interpretation? You got it, friend! 大辞林曰く、 【 】の中【なか】の漢字【かんじ】が「常用【じょうよう】漢字【かんじ】表【ひょう】」にないものには「 ▼ 」、その漢字が「常用漢字表」にはあるが見出【みだ】しに相当【そうとう】する音訓【おんくん】が示【しめ】されていないものには「 ▽ 」を漢字の右肩【みぎかた】に付【ふ】した。 If a given kanji isn't part of the 常用漢字 list, it'll be marked with a ▼. If it is part of the 常用漢字 list but uses a non-standard ...


14

It reads に、さんにち (the comma is purely orthographic, you may or may not write it out). Similarly, we say... 一、二日 いち、ににち 三、四日 さん、よっか ← irregular! 四、五日 し、ごにち 五、六日 ご、ろくにち Longer span equivalents are hardly heard, perhaps because we come to use "a week" (一週間) or other higher units then, I suppose. ふた、みっか might actually sound surprisingly comprehensible ...


14

It's read as はつしょうぎょうし. You can never find it in dictionaries because it's actually three words: 初【はつ】: first (jisho.org) 商業誌【しょうぎょうし】: commercial book/magazine (often as opposed to dōjinshi) 商業【しょうぎょう】: commerce (jisho.org) 誌【し】: (suffix) magazine (jisho.org) 初商業誌 is typically used when a dōjin manga-ka makes a debut on a magazine available in the ...


14

Basically this is very difficult. Real Japanese sentences on the net are mixture of kanji, hiragana, katakana and English alphabet. See Japanese writing system on Wikipedia. Among these, hiragana and katakana are almost "pronunciation symbols" themselves. You can replace them into romaji using this table and you're 80% done. The remaining 20% is a bit ...


13

First of all, be aware that 一日 is usually read ichinichi, to count one day, or tsuitachi, when it refers to the first day of a month (as in "April the 1st"). But the phenomenon you spotted in ippi also happens to other words, so let's talk about that. The simple explanation of ippi is that, when you join a ち (like いち) to ひ, the sequence ち-ひ usually becomes ...


12

Do native Japanese know both readings for every Kanji? As much has every Roman knew latin. Some kanji have a large number of on-readings (consider 行: AN, GYOU, KOU, which are comonly known), plus a large number of kun-readings (行: i(ku), okona(u), yu(ku), i(keru), kudari) plus several "Nanori" - readings that are used in first names (行: nami, michi,...). ...


12

Japanese speakers also use the strategy you describe, guessing at the 音読み from the right side of the 漢字 (or otherwise). However, the Japanese have a larger "database" from which to sample when making their guess... & 3. I don't think these phonetic relationships are as obvious to native speakers as to foreign adult learners. The relationships are not ...


12

I don't know of any dictionary or reference book, but since 御 is most often written as お or ご, as appropriate, you could check the Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese (BCCWJ, 少納言, http://www.kotonoha.gr.jp/shonagon) as the proper way of "doing Google counting". For 忙しい and 自分 the numbers are お忙しい 217 results ご忙しい 0 results お自分 8 results, ...


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