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17

Adding -さん is definitely not conventional as a formal Japanese name card. But English-only name cards are not conventional in the first place, and hardly sticking to the traditional style may not be always good for a startup. Getting to know how to call each other is one of the difficult tasks in foreign communications. If I received a name card with ムルさん on ...


15

The pronunciation さん is derived from [様]{さま}. I guess it should never be written using the kanji.


14

The group mentality is very strong in Japan. When talking to an outsider about your company members, it's like you are talking about yourself. You must never use さん when talking about yourself. It would feel to the outsider like you are acting superior and putting yourself(your boss) on a pedestal. A little bit like those brats that everyone hates in anime ...


13

「おいかがですか?」("How are you feeling?") should probably be avoided even though some native speakers actually say it. The reason for that, however, is not that there is already 「です」 in there expressing politeness. Rather, it is because the word 「いかが」 is already on the pretty polite and formal side. Adding the honorific 「お」 to it does make it sound overly ...


13

As a general rule, almost all verbs can be transformed into an honorific form, and many, but not all, can be transformed into a humble form*. The chart you pasted lists special/irregular forms. So, for verbs not listed in that chart, you can usually transform them into the basic/regular honorific/humble forms, like this: Honorific forms: 「お~~になる」 ...


11

I don't know of any dictionary or reference book, but since 御 is most often written as お or ご, as appropriate, you could check the Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese (BCCWJ, 少納言, http://www.kotonoha.gr.jp/shonagon) as the proper way of "doing Google counting". For 忙しい and 自分 the numbers are お忙しい 217 results ご忙しい 0 results お自分 8 results, ...


11

There used to be a clear bias toward men, but today you can safely use 氏 for women as well. If you read articles written in the Meiji or Taisho period, you'll probably see 氏 used for men and 女史 for women with a high social status. I found an example here. Note that horizontal sentences were written from right to left in those days. Today, 女史 has almost ...


10

According to デジタル大辞泉, the Agency for Cultural Affairs (文化庁) conducted a study on this topic and found that 69.2% of people used お疲れ様 to someone of a higher rank vs. 15.1% for ご苦労様. To someone of a lower rank, 53.4% used お疲れ様, vs. 36.1% for ご苦労様. So I would conclude from this that it is safe to use お疲れ様 to someone of a higher rank, whereas ご苦労様 should ...


10

Yes, that happens very often in real life when: 1) Small children refer to or address animals. 2) Adults talk to small kids about animals. Even adults often use 「ちゃん」 and 「君{くん}」 to refer to or address the pets of poeple they know well, which is just like referring to or addressing their friends' kids. Here are songs about An elephant (ぞう): https://www....


10

おっしゃる通り、「拝見ありがとうございます。」は敬語の使い方が間違っています。「拝見いただきありがとうございます。」「ご拝見ありがとうございます。」「拝見していただき...」などは、(言おうとしていることはわかるんですが、)どれもおかしいです。 「拝見」「拝読」「拝聴」などは謙譲語ですから、相手の行為には使いません。「ご覧くださりありがとうございます。」「ご覧くださってありがとうございます。」(または、「ご覧いただき...」。この「~いただき」は間違っているとの意見もありますが。)などと言うのが正しいと思います。 敬語は日本語母語話者にも難しいようで、結構多くの人が間違えて使っていたり、間違えて覚えていたりします。私も、何かしら間違って使ってしまっているんだろうなと思いますが...。


9

It was a common practice during the Edo and Meiji periods and on through Taishou and early Shouwa periods. Women's names back then tended to be short (mostly two-syllable long and sometimes just one as OP's example) and surprisingly simple compared to their present-day counterparts. Baby girls were often named literally after simple plant, flower and ...


9

This is called 「ウ[音便]{おんびん}」 and it is one type of the 「音便 (euphonic sound changes)」 that took place around Heian period (794 - 1185). 「ウ音便」, in the simplest terms possible, is the dropping of the "k" consonant from the [連用形]{れんようけい} (continuative form) of i-adjectives. The 連用形 of 「うれしい」 is 「うれしく」. Drop the "k" from 「うれしく」 and you have 「うれしう」. To make 「...


9

Yes. ~様 is an honorific and can be easily thought of as a more respectful version of ~さん. It is gender neutral, so it can be used by both men and women when addressing either gender. It is often used when addressing someone of a higher social position, or someone for whom you have high regards. On a day-to-day basis, it's commonly used to address ...


8

おいかが(ですか) sounds unnatural. いかが(ですか) is already polite so you don't need to add お.


7

There are simply too many to mention. Here are some of the more common trios of words presented in the order of [尊敬語]{そんけいご}--[普通語]{ふつうご}--[謙譲語]{けんじょうご}. English: Respectful (your ~~) -- General (a/an ~~) -- Humble (my/our ~~) Shop: [貴店]{きてん}--[店]{みせ}--[当店]{とうてん} School: [貴校]{きこう}--[学校]{がっこう}--[当校]{とうこう} Bank: [貴行]{きこう}--[銀行]{ぎんこう}--[当行]{とうこう} ...


7

You cannot say 「お恋人{こいびと}」; That sounds very weird. 「お付{つ}き合{あ}いの方{かた}」 is okay. Other natural-sounding expressions would include: ・交際相手{こうさいあいて}の方{かた} ・交際されている方 ・お相手{あいて}の方 ・お相手の男性{だんせい}/女性{じょせい}(の方) ・お付{つ}き合{あ}いされている方 ・恋人{こいびと}の~~さん/~~氏{し}


7

In osara, the o is indeed honorific and it is commonly written in kana as お, but sometimes also as 御. As you are likely aware, there is often some flexibility in choosing between kanji, hiragana and katakana to write any given text. As for osara, it would usually be written as お皿, because the honorific o is usually written お and because sara is usually ...


6

「して」 is not dropped; It was not there in the first place. 「ご利用」 is an honorific noun and all you need to add is 「ください」 to form a polite request with it. You just cannot add 「して」; It is not even an option. Other common examples include: 「ご[覧]{らん}ください。」(Please have a look.),「お[越]{こ}しください。」(Please come.),「お[求]{もと}めください。」(Please purchase.),「お[試]{ため}しください。」(...


6

お + [masu-stem] + ください is keigo (honorific speech) for [te-form] + ください. This rule works for verbs, which don't have a separate keigo verb, e.g. 切る お切りください If the verb does have a separate keigo form, the formation is different: お見ください → ご覧ください お言いください → おっしゃってください お行きください → いらしてください お来ください → おこしください


6

-たん is a lisped version of -ちゃん. It's probably the most cute-sounding, casual name suffix in Japanese. There are many fictional (usually female) characters who are always called with -たん. OS-tan (oh, this article has an explanation for -tan, too) Binchō-tan You should never use -たん in business settings even though it may be grammatically classified as an "...


6

Actually it's not a good idea to translate it. Japanese mail carriers can read envelopes written in English format, and a bizarre mix of the Japanese and English styles would make your envelope look worse. Rest assured that you can always write "The Tanaka Family" or "Mr. Taro Tanaka", using English alphabet, on the first line. (EDIT: By the way, did you ...


6

You'd have to consider the perspective in which you view this person yourself. Wikipedia and other such articles will not refer to a person with a suffix because Wikipedia or encyclopedias in general as neutral sources of information do not have such a perspective. If you yourself met this person, or wanted to describe or talk about this person to someone ...


6

It's ご趣味. As a general rule for nouns, ご beautifies a word which uses the on-yomi (e.g. ご質問 or ご主人), while お beautifies a word which uses the kun-yomi (e.g. お米 or お金).


5

Prefixing a word with お or ご does not necessarily make it an honorific. The following is an example of humble speech (謙譲語): 先生へのお手紙 ...while this is an example of honorific language (尊敬語): 先生からのお手紙 Notice that both phrases use お手紙. 美化語 does not mean honorific. 美化語 is used to make one's speech sound more refined (美化 = beautification, 語 = word/...


5

As you probably have already guessed, there is no hard rule about how many times you can use お and ご prefixes in a sentence. We often avoid using too many honorifics, and it is true that there is a general tendency to use honorifics in the final verbs. However, we sometimes use honorifics also in other places. This is different from 二重敬語. For example, ...


5

In particular, inside a company, would it be normal to use 尊敬語・謙譲語・丁重語 with anyone older or higher in rank? It seems like that might be too excessive. Does usage depend on factors such as context or personality? This is very tricky even for a native Japanese, and it does vary among companies. One has to observe others and gauge what the temperature is (aka ...


5

The common way to create humble/respectful forms (謙譲語・尊敬語) of verbs of the form Sinitic(音読み)-compound-する, e.g. 利用する is (ご)利用する・(ご)利用いたす humble forms ご利用になる・ご利用なさる respectful forms (Let's ignore for now whether the humble form should have ご or not) You could argue that ご利用して下さい requests the other person to be humble, so prescriptively it is incorrect ...


5

Off the top of my head.... In scholarly and/or technical writing regarding bathing or baths. In advertisement for apartments, describing whether they are equipped with bath tubs or not. In the news about a bathroom. Regardless of the context, many male speakers choose to use 「風呂」 over 「お風呂」 on a daily basis.


5

「先生のご活躍は多岐にわたっていらっしゃいます」 seems OK. Consider these other examples: 「先生のご出身は東京でいらっしゃいます」 「先生のご指摘はごもっともでいらっしゃいます」 「社長の方針は内製化でいらっしゃいます」 「先生の演説は素敵でいらっしゃいました」 While these are odd: 「先生の車はベンツでいらっしゃいます」 「先生のネクタイは素敵でいらっしゃいます」 Assuming my judgments are correct, I think the important part is how representative the noun is of the honorable person. Someone's origin, ...


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