We changed our privacy policy. Read more.

Hot answers tagged

32

No, やれ{HL}やれ{HL} is not an onomatopoeia but an interjection. It doesn't symbolize any sound or state, and cannot used like other onomatopoeiae: × やれやれという音を立てて × やれやれした様子で But as you said, it's true that this word has no fixed translation in English. For example, Haruki Murakami is known to use this expression repeatedly as one of his signature style, ...


19

It's a pun. In fact, many, many of Dragonball's characters are puns on food (or food-related) items: サイヤ人 Saiyajin from [ヤサイ]{野菜}人 "vegetable people" ベジータ Vegeta from ベジタブル "vegetable" ウーロン Oolong from 烏龍 (type of tea) ピラフ Pilaf ランチ Lunch ヤムチャ Yamcha from 飲茶【やむちゃ】 (snacks & tea) カリン塔【とう】 Korin Tower from 花林糖【かりんとう】 (type of sweets) バーダック Burdock from 牛蒡【...


14

いい年して「友達【ともだち】」って、ちょっと照れるけど。 The word tomodachi ("friend") itself is not really embarrassing, although there is a more formal word for this concept. In this case, this tomodachi also represents the whole exchange he has just made with the tsundere dragon. Indeed, innocently and directly saying 友達にならないか ("Let's be friends!") is not something a typical middle-...


13

救われん is made of 救われる and the archaic suffix ん, which came out of む. む・ん had similar roles to よう・おう today; that is to say, 救われん in modern style would be 救われよう or 救われるだろう. It is not related to the ん that comes out of ぬ, which is a strong or dialectal way of stating a negative. Additionally, as chocolate says in the comments, 祈り信じよ means 'Pray and believe', ...


11

Adding a peculiar "sound" at the end of almost every sentence is an idiosyncrasy of many characters in Japanese anime/manga/games. Most of these sounds are simply omitted after being translated into English, but there are a few exceptions. For example even in the English version of Final Fantasy, moogles speak like "How are you, kupo!", and this kupo means ...


11

The safest neutral phrase is ○○ファン (e.g. アニメファン / 漫画ファン / アニメやゲームのファン / etc), which is widely used both by otaku and non-otaku people. This can be safely used with non-otaku hobbies, too (e.g. サッカーファン, 将棋ファン). This is definitely the first choice, for example when you write a news article introducing (favorably) an otaku event in mass media. Other common ...


11

やれ、やれ is an interjection often uttered when ① you are relieved from a burden or mental pressure, or ② when you have some burden or a little problem ahead, for example: ①やれやれ、[一仕事]{ひとしごと}終わった - Oh boy, I’ve finished this job. やれやれ、やっと[飯]{めし}が[炊]{た}けた - Here we go! Rice is done. やれやれ、借金も終わって[肩]{かた}の[荷]{に}が[下]{お}りた - Thank God. I settled the loans. I'm now ...


11

It very much depends on what anime. For example, an anime about daily life in the modern world would have generally "normal" Japanese. Conversational snippets sound totally normal, for the most part. You start to have "unnatural" Japanese when the writers, trying to make characters unique, give those people special "quirks" such as always referring to ...


11

This function of this か is not purely phonetic, but rather serves to make the sentence less of a outward statement and more of a self-directed or self-reflecting one. It makes the information value of sentence primarily be “I had considered ~ previously but wasn’t sure, but in the end it indeed it is 〜, huh...” It’s often is accompanied by やっぱり (or 予想通り ...


10

ニコニコしとれば 悪さは しねえし いつの間にか いねくなっちまうんだ。 This is the same as the following sentence written in the standard Japanese. ニコニコしていれば悪さはしないし、いつの間にかいなくなってしまうんだ。 If you keep smiling, they won't do bad things, and they go away before you notice. The original sentence is not in a particular "dialect", but a typical role language of an old man/lady (aka 老人語). しとる ...


10

Official as opposed to fanfiction/dojin is simply 公式. But do you want to refer to the canonical story line as opposed to that of a spin-off based on an alternative/what-if story? Like "main" Attack on Titan as opposed to Attack on Titan: Junior High, or "main" Dragon Ball as opposed to That Time I Got Reincarnated as Yamcha? In this case, both are 公式, so to ...


10

~でいい (or ~で大丈夫, etc) is an expression that means "~ is acceptable (if not ideal)". I think this is something you can learn by rote. See: What is the difference between それでいい and それがいい here? Maggie Sensei: Noun + で(も)いい VS +がいい So the literal translation is: 私でよければ入部させてください。 If I'm acceptable (to you), let me join the club. And the implication ...


9

It means nothing, trust me. In manga/anime, authors customarily create weird, non-sense or parodic proper nouns for companies, schools, newspapers, etc. They do so because they are legally not allowed to use real existing proper nouns. There often are, however, "funny" similarities between some of those fictional proper nouns and the real proper nouns ...


8

Is it otaku version of -さん? Yes...sort of. Originally, -氏【し】 is a honorific and highly formal name suffix used to refer to someone with high social status. There are several existing questions regarding its non-otaku, "proper" usage on this site: What criteria decides whether to print 「氏」 or 「さん」 at the end of a person's name in newspapers? What does ...


7

Made-up words are generally based on the existing Japanese naming convention. I generally recommend that you familiarize yourself with a lot of Japanese existing compounds before wondering about this problem at this level. Especially distinguishing on- and kun- readings is critical. Please read this section carefully. 三刀流 If you already know a word 二刀流, ...


7

In a light novel, manga or such, 「……っ!」 without any preceding kana describes the speaker is speechless or breathless for a moment. Usually it expresses a strong surprise, anger, confusion or any "breathtaking" feelings. "Tch" to express one's irritation is usually ちっ or ちぇっ.


7

As far as I know, 目 is used to talk about the position of something that is not structured or categorized beforehand and whose elements are equal if you disregard their position. On the other hand, 第 is used with elements of a set that conform a fixed, logical structure made of units, where each of those units has a particular meaning or content that makes ...


7

It is true that Japanese people use a larger number of words on a daily basis. According to one survey introduced here, the number of words needed to understand 90% of English sentences is 3,000, but you need to know 10,000 words to achieve the same level of proficiency in Japanese. As you know, Japanese has tons of onomatopoeic words, wago-kango pairs and ...


7

You've answered your own question here, you just haven't managed to figure out how your answer applies to the given text. AもBも is supposed to mean "Both A and B", but as far as I understand it's supposed to be followed by a predicate... It is followed by a predicate. That predicate is 当てがなくなる. Basically you can parse it out like this: (宿も食い物も) (...


6

I think 「〜[好]{ず}き」 is a common expression in Japan these days. If someone likes anime very much, s/he is 「アニメ[好]{ず}き」. The usage example is http://news.mynavi.jp/articles/2015/06/21/ibayashi/ If someone likes manga very much, s/he is 「マンガ[好]{ず}き」. The usage example is https://www.booklista.co.jp/feature/harajyuku/ Edit: アニメ[好]{ず}き does not mean exactly the ...


6

Both 「そこんとこ」 and 「そこんところ」 are colloquial pronunciations of: 「そこのところ」 This is a very common expression which means "the point (that has been) raised" These phrases are often followed by 「だが」、「ですが」, etc. making the whole phrase mean "Regarding the point raised(, though,)".


6

これは儀式だ! This is a ritual! これは[Vする]ための儀式だ! This is a ritual to [verb]! これは[S]が[Vする]ための儀式だ! This is a ritual for [S] to [verb]! これは[お互い]が、[「深まった」と了承しあう]ための儀式だ! This is a ritual for [both of us] to [mutually acknowledge that (our relationship) has been deepened]! A simpler example would be これは子どもが読むための本です。 "This is a book for children to read." I ...


6

While there were many blog entries on keigo usage that said both 参る and 伺う are 謙譲語 for 行く, all of the dictionaries I checked (広辞苑, 新明解, 大辞林, etc.) agreed that 伺う is a 謙譲語 for 訪問する/訪れる, not 行く. So the quiz segment is technically correct, even though it seems like a lot of people think 伺う is also a 謙譲語 for 行く. This is probably because 参る and 伺う are often ...


6

You've broken down everything perfectly. 生まれてきて is the combination of 生まれる+てくる in the Te-form. This is a grammar point that is explained in more depth here. Here, てくる essentially adds the nuance that someone is "born into (this world)" rather than just "born in (this world)". You are correct that this ~てしまう means something accidental and ...


6

Your intuition is pretty accurate. It's expressing a feeling of "...what does that have to do with anything?" or "why are you asking?". Mugen doesn't understand why he's being asked his name. A similar pattern would be: A:「何才ですか?」 B:「30才だけど...」 A: How old are you? B: I'm 30... (what does that have to do with anything?) Or: A:「だれの車?」 B:「...


5

"Hikarian" is a proper noun, and unique to this anime. Ordinary dictionaries don't have this word. In the Wikipedia article, I can see almost all of the characters are named after Japanese trains or famous stations. English Wikipedia article has many links to the original Japanese trains. According to the Japanese article, "Hikarian" is the name of a ...


5

This type of ね is a filler particle meaning nothing. Such fillers can appear in many places within a sentence. ね is one of the typical "girly" filler particles. You don't have to translate them, although English fillers such as "you know" or "er" may be used if you fell they're appropriate. See the following answers, which are closely related. https://...


5

Both of your examples appear to be typical 擬人化 to me. "There is no word for the former" is probably not correct. Simply, the Japanese word 擬人化 safely covers both the former and the latter. I don't know any formal pair of words to distinguish the two in Japanese. If there are such words, that must be ones recognized only by professional researchers. 擬人観 is a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible