22

I fell on my ass. 「尻餅{しりもち}をついた」 「私、しりもちついちゃった。」


21

This sentence is indeed regarded as one of the most difficult translation challenges. This sentence has been translated variously by many translators. Kawai Shunichiro, one of the translators of Hamlet, has the list of 40 translation attempts that have been made by experts. To list a few: アリマス、アリマセン、アレワナンデスカ 1874年、チャールズ・ワーグマン 死ぬるが増か生くるが増か ...


15

ストライプ vs. ボーダー = Vertical Stripes vs. Horizontal Stripes Until about two decades ago, both were called 「ストライプ」. Then, the fashion industry people invented the name 「ボーダー」 to refer to "horizontal stripes" as a buzzword to make it popular and did they ever succeed!


14

So here's the Urban Dictionary's definition: A person who puts a large amount of effort into achieving a certain image, or counter-image, to the point where it is obviously contrived. Rather than achieving an image through genuine personality, the try-hard consciously attempts to fit a certain style through deliberate imitation, forced style, or scripted ...


14

If you are looking for a slang term used in business that actually feels like "ASAP", we have: 「なる早{はや}」 which is short for 「なるべく早く」. You can say: 「なる早でお願{ねが}いします。」 or just 「なる早で!」


13

I don't think there's a direct translation of "slice of life" into Japanese in the context of Anime genres, however I think 空気系{くうきけい} would be a close candidate. This genre is also sometimes called 日常系{にちじょうけい} (See also the Japanese Wikipedia article for 空気系). It means something like "atmosphere type", and refers to Anime which doesn't have any dramatic ...


12

When you want to translate names, just look for some famous ones in Wikipedia. ハスケル・カリー


12

I think a simple one is 一日一歩{いちにちいっぽ} which in romaji is ichinichi ippo. This literally means "one day one step" and it bears the meaning of "one day at the time" in English. There is as well another way to express a similar meaning with 一日一日{いちにちいちにち}を着実{ちゃくじつ}に. In romaji ichinichi ichinichi wo chakujitsu ni. This is a bit hard to translate literally as ...


12

How about 「[視聴]{しちょう}[回数]{かいすう}」? I think [再生]{さいせい}回数 would also work.


11

You are using what could be interpreted as two different verbs: まける -> to lose しっぱいする -> to fail Formally, I usually hear "I cannot afford to fail" rather than "I don't want to fail". 失敗する余裕はありません。 If you want to sound cool, you could say "I don't have any intention on losing". 負けるつもりはありません。


11

I believe it will more sound natural if the sentence goes like this. 多くのオランダ人は自転車に乗ります。 This way it can mean "to use" "go by" or " take the" , which you want to tell.


11

You can use 期【き】, シリーズ, 部【ぶ】, or シーズン, all of which are common. Here are the examples taken from Wikipedia (I haven't confirmed, but presumably these reflect the official namings): けいおん! 第2期 3年B組金八先生 第7シリーズ(2004年 - 2005年) Xファイル 第5シーズン (or シーズン5) 水戸黄門 第38部 (2008年) These are basically interchangeable, but here's my impression: 期: very common ...


11

Literal translations such as 「(もっと/より)少なく + verb + したい」 would sound unnatural... There would be several ways to say that, but off the top of my head right now, I think you could probably use 「~を少なくしたい」 or 「~を減らしたい」, as in: 睡眠時間/寝る時間を減らしたい。 睡眠時間/寝る時間を少なくしたい。 I want to sleep less. (lit. I want to decrease sleeping time.) 食べる量を減らしたい。 食べる量を少なくしたい。 ...


11

「でもだんだんやさしくなることは本当{ほんとう}です。」 Nice try, but it only sounds 80-85% natural. (It is 100% grammatical if it is the grammar that matters.) 「本当」: A more natural word choice would be 「事実{じじつ}」. Using 「本当」 there could make it sound a bit childish. 「なる」: The native speaker's phrase choice would be 「なってきている」 or 「なっている」. 「でもなるほど日本語がますますやさしくなってきています。」 Excellent ...


10

イギリス sounds like English, but actually イギリス is NOT equivalent to English. According to this web page, イギリス is an import word from Portuguese language. It originally means England, but its meaning has changed in Japan. It doesn't only mean England, but entire land of the UK now. So, イギリス is the equivalent to the UK. イギリス人{じん} is equivalent to British people,...


10

As you have correctly guessed, 文章 refers to a group of sentences/paragraphs. To refer to a single sentence, simply use 文, which is perfectly fine as a technical term, too. 一文 means "one sentence". It's used when one needs to emphasize "one".


10

For casual, which is acceptable as a client I would go with じゃあ、カレーにします。 If you want to be more polite then それなら、カレーにします。 じゃあ means : then; well; so; well then それなら means : if that's the case


10

Does 今度 mean “this time” or “next time”? It is very annoying but it has both meanings. How do you use it or interpret it? I think an answer in italki gives the best answer to OP's question. I found a good explanation in it as: 「今度」のかかっている部分が過去・現在のことなら「このたび」、未来のことなら「この次」になります。最終的には文脈で判断するしかありません。 If the part of a sentence qualified by "今度" describes ...


9

ウイルス等が検出されませんでした sounds more like "No virus were detected", which is different from "Virus-free". The first thing I'd like to mention is that most sophisticated Japanese e-commerce sites do not say anything like this in their download pages, at least in a large font. To me, saying "virus free" loudly already smells like typical foreign sites (some of which ...


9

It is not nearly as simple as in English or many other languages. You could say: 「X + は + Y + 年前{ねんまえ}のものである。」 「X + は + Y + 年前からある。」 「X + は + Y + 年前にできた。」 ←「できた」 here can be replaced by a verb in the passsive voice form such as 「作{つく}られた」,「建{た}てられた」, etc. For buildings and trees, however, we have common set expressions. Buildings: 「このビルは築{ちく}...


9

I think there are quite a few acceptable ways to say it. Here are a few of them I can think of. 大至急 できるだけ早く lit. as soon as possible. 出来る限り早期に lit. as soon as possible. 今すぐ used at my company as a status for tasks that have the highest priority. できる限り早く lit. as soon as possible. 一日も早く


9

Your attempt is good, but you need to use この辺り【あたり】の instead of ここの to say "around here". この辺りのいちばんの居酒屋はどこですか。 Related: Difference between 辺り and 周り


9

As a prefix, you could use 二大{にだい}- as in something like 二大政党: two major parties. As a predicate, 双璧{そうへき} e.g. 奈良を訪れる(に あたって)一番いい時期(として)は、春と秋が双璧だ (though it's pointless to apply it to 2 out of only 4). You could modify a noun through a form of 双璧を成す{なす} like 奈良を訪れるにあたって双璧をなす季節{きせつ}は…, but it's extravagant and rather nonsensical to your example. So, you ...


8

Written Japanese contains a syllabary (like an alphabet) called Kana. All of the "letters" in this syllabary, with the exception of the "letter" "N" (ん/ン) end in a vowel. Thus anytime a foreign word ends in a consonant (with the exception of "N"), it is natural for a Japanese speaker to pronounce this consonant with a vowel after it. This is not a question ...


8

I often hear it referred to as [ムービー]{LHHH} (rather than [ムービー]{HLLL}), although I hear カットシーン is equally common.


8

It looks to me like [蝶結]{ちょうむす}び. We also call it [蝶々結]{ちょうちょうむす}び, or more casually ちょうちょ[結]{むす}び. [蝶]{ちょう}, or [蝶々]{ちょうちょう}, ちょうちょ means "butterfly".


7

I believe you are making the mistake of attempting to replicate an English pattern in Japanese. As snailboat points out, the idiomatic equivalent is as follows: 泥棒はいつまでたっても泥棒。/三つ子の魂百まで。/性格を変えることはできない。 And if you make this search, http://eow.alc.co.jp/search?q=Once+a+always+a one finds that the nearest Japanese equivalent seems to be: noun phrase ...


7

Yes. The word for it is 読み間違える, as you hinted at. Some other words that seem to be more limited to metaphorical instances of reading people or situations include 読{よ}み誤{あやま}る ("misread the political picture" 政治情勢を読み誤る) as well as 見誤{みあやま}る ("misread a signal," or 合図[信号・サイン]を見誤る) These examples and others can be seen here.


7

Here in Japan these days, I actually see and hear 「[vs.]{バーサス}」 as often as or even more often than 「[対]{たい}」. 「対」 would tend to suggest a physical fight or conflict, so we tend not to use it in other contexts.


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